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Press Releases

These are the press releases we've issued over the last year. You may want to search for topics by keyword.

 

Editor's Bible Study Column

Doris Mangrum, Independent Film Producer to Debut “STAINS” 
A Documentary on Prisoner Reentry

All About The Youth HOLY HIP HOP & BULLDOG BIKES BMX

 

ARCHIVES LISTED BELOW

 

“Celebrating The Life, The Dream, The Legacy”

 

KING (Poem) By Kirk Jones US Navy

 

Leslie A. Morris, Author of “How Ya Like Me Now” Uses Life’s Experience to Empower Women

 

Visionary’s Dream Leads To Lucrative Offers In The Millions

 

Reverend Tony C. Evans Celebrates 10 years of Leading Tenth Street Baptist Church into the New Era.

 

“Color Blind” A Mixed Girl's Perspective on Biracial Life

 

“The Anointed News Journal” Celebrates 18 Years of Service with Its Second Annual Black Tie Fundraising Gala

 

The Anointed News Journal Seeks the Support of Its Readers

 

Choosing Everyday Pleasures Over Protecting Your Family Can Lead to Disaster
A Few Pointers to Protect Your Income and Your Family

 

FINANCE 101 10-10-80 Rule: Paying yourself first can lead to financial independence

 

It’s Not What You Earn, It’s What You Keep

 

September Is National Life Insurance Awareness Month A Few Pointers to Protect Your Income and Your Family

 

Historic Jacob’s Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church, Shares Its History from the Underground Railroad to Modern Ministry. 

 

Pastor Amir Khan Leads the Charge by Opening New Training School Preparing People for Work in Hospitality

 

Youth Group Gains International Acclaim 

 

Golden Reflex Offers the Total Care Package for Relaxation 

 

Golden Reflex Massage Therapy Shares the Benefits of Having Massages as Part of Your Life

 

School of Hard Knocks

 

UNITY, Several Nonprofits and Community Groups Collaborate to Bring Positive Change to Southern New Jersey

 

THe 12th annual hair oscars 

 

Author, Radio Personality and Prophet Matthew Dare O’Dunlami Release Holy Spirit Manufactured Prayer, A Daily Devotional Guidance With The Lord  

 

Regis Academy Charter School "Teaching Technology of Tomorrow to our Children Today"

 

Pastor B. Purnell and Alicia Wright Celebrates Ordination with the Launch of Victory in Praise Ministries Inside Echelon Mall 

 

Overcoming Incest and Moving Mountains

 

“The Journey” A Documentary Tracing the African Slave Trade from Ghana, West Africa to Camden, NJ

 

Author Dawn M. Bunch Releases Second Book, “Women of Timelessness”, A New Awakening of the Mind, Body and Soul Dialogue

Ten Ways to Live a Healthier Life

Author Shanon Bellamy "Pimps In the Pulpit" Interview

Mark Bryant, CEO CAMcare Outlook on Affordable Healthcare

The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess Opens on Broadway with Curtain Call and Cast Party

Disney’s Geno Segers Scores on Stage and Television as a Fan Favorite “Actor has ties to local community”

 

Compassionate Care Offers A Whole New Approach To Hospice  

 

Dooley House, Troy/Wallsten House of Hope and Partners Team Up for Annual Aids Walk at Cooper River Park

 

Langston Miles Sharing the Importance of being a Mentor

 

Visionary Entertainment Sensation “Yung Poppa” Noted as the Industry’s Future Superstar

Cory Pritchett, Co-Star of “Sparkle”

Queen Pauline Speaks

Monica’s Motivational Message:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recent Media Coverage of ANOINTED NEWS JOURNAL

 

Denise Morrison, President/CEO of the Campbell Soup Company and Leslie Morris, Founder of WOD

32 Professional African American Women of the Dream Visit Camden, New Jersey to Mentor 15 Young Ladies from Camden High School. Simmons College Graduates Travel Across the Country to Answer the Call to Mentor Young Students.

Camden, NJ - Women of the Dream (WOD) was born in 2011 when two women—Denise Morrison, President/CEO of the Campbell Soup Company and Leslie Morris, Founder of WOD—were attending a high school get-together. Denise, in her discussion with Leslie about her climb up the corporate ladder, mentioned having met and worked with a number of phenomenal Black female graduates of Simmons College—a small private women’s college in Boston and Leslie’s alma mater. “Lots of successful Black women have come out of Simmons College,” Denise said. She mentioned having met and worked with Ann Brown Fudge and Paula Sneed, who are considered among the most powerful Black women in business and corporate America. “Is it something in the water at Simmons?” Denise asked. They both laughed and knew they were on to something.

Leslie had been tracking the success of Black female graduates of Simmons for the last 20 years. She was known to frequently call upon her Simmons sisters to speak with African-American girls in her own work and mentoring activities. At the same time, Leslie was gradually developing her vision to document the success stories of Black women to inspire, energize, and support struggling Black youth—and not just a few here and there, but nationwide. She simply needed the resources to take her vision to the next level.

Back to the conversation at the high school get-together, Denise—with her passion for also giving back to young people with limited opportunities—encouraged Leslie to submit her vision in the form of a proposal. Within a few weeks, Leslie delivered the proposal and identified a group of Black female graduates of Simmons College who were willing to share their stories in a focus group format.

In June 2012 this cohort of 32 Black female graduates that represented the classes of 1965-79 met at the Campbell Soup Company’s headquarters in Camden, NJ for a focus group that involved guided discussions on where they began in life, their experiences at a predominantly White women’s college during the Civil Rights movement, their personal and career challenges/successes, and how their stories can be used to guide a new generation for girls of color.

Following the success of the focus group, a survey was developed to expand the findings of the June convening and disseminated to nearly 200 Black female graduates of the 1965-79 classes. More than 50 percent responded to questions about the people and factors that most contributed to their personal and career success. The results of the survey were presented at the Simmons College Black Symposium on April 13, 2013.

With ongoing support from the Campbell Soup Company, Women of the Dream has moved to a readiness to establish a national nonprofit organization that enables African-American girls to achieve their fullest potential and lead purposeful, healthy lives.

Denise Morrison, President/CEO of the Campbell Soup Company 

2012 Focus Group

In June 2012, a cohort of 32 Black female graduates of Simmons College, representing the classes of 1965-79, convened at the Campbell Soup headquarters in Camden, New Jersey for a focus group that involved guided discussions on topics such as:

·         Where these women began in life,

·         Their experiences at a predominantly white women’s college during the Civil Rights movement,

·         Personal and career challenges and successes, and

·         How to use their stories to inspire a new generation of African-American girls.

Their stories were documented with the intent of sharing them with young African-American girls to help inspire and motivate them on their own life journey.

 

The Women of the Dream, Inc. will provide programs and resources that will meet the needs and challenges of African-American girls, and prepare them for personal, career, and economic success.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Women of the Dream, Inc. is to educate and empower African-American girls to make healthy choices in every aspect of their lives by providing personal growth and development services through one-on-one and group mentoring, workshops, and career development programs.

Vision Statement

To provide the highest quality services to enable African-American girls to achieve their fullest potential and lead purposeful, healthy lives.

Target Population

African-American girls ages 12-18.

STUDENTS FROM CAMDEN HIGH SCHOOL PREPARING FOR MENTORING SESSION

STUDENTS IN SESSION WITH MENTORS

Programs

·         One-on-one and group mentoring in collaboration with existing mentoring programs.

·         Workshops covering topics concerning success, positive decision-making, risk avoidance, life skills, career choices, goal-setting, healthy relationships, pregnancy/HIV/STD prevention, budgeting and finance, and other aspects of life that will assist in positive outcomes as the participants transition from adolescence to adulthood.

·         A training program for high school girls who are interested in working in corporate America/business world.

·         Conferences that will offer workshops, career counseling, mentoring, and the opportunity to network with successful women of color.

Program Goals

·         Increase awareness of the importance of mentoring young girls

·         Promote academic excellence among girls

·         Assist girls in identifying and pursuing career interests

·         Empower girls to develop healthy lifestyles and outcomes

·         Assess and evaluate the effectiveness of all program components

 

 

Who are the Women of the Dream?

The “Women of the Dream” are among the Black youth who came of age during the modern civil rights era between 1954–the year the Supreme Court outlawed segregation in public schools–and 1968, the year Martin Luther King, Jr. (MLK) was assassinated. These Black youths formed the vanguard of what Sylvester Monroe, an award-winning journalist, termed the “integration generation”, a generation shaped by the belief that the key to black success in America was education and assimilation into the very culture that had long denied Blacks equal access and opportunity. They are the first generation of Black children to benefit from the Civil Rights Movement, a movement that opened doors to White institutions previously closed to Black people.

The Black youth of this generation were from primarily poor and working-class families, and many were the first in their families to attend college. As a result of the Civil Rights struggles and victories, such as governmental programs offering financial support for college attendance, the Women of the Dream were among the first generation of Black children to attend White colleges and universities in large numbers. The 1960s and ’70s saw a tremendous influx of Black students in White institutions. For example, in the 1960s three quarters of all Black students attended Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). By the mid-1970s, the bulk of Black enrollment had shifted from traditional HBCUs to predominantly White institutions. At Simmons College, the 70s saw the largest enrollment of Black women in the history of the College.

The parents and grandparents of this generation were the “dreamers.” They were among the millions of Blacks who moved out of the rural Southern United States to the urban Northeast, Midwest, and West during the Great Migration from 1910 to 1970. The dreamers moved to cities such as Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Los Angeles, Newark, New York, Pittsburgh, and Philadelphia. These cities offered Blacks jobs in factories, the railroad system, and automobile plants while providing a chance to earn a decent wage that afforded their children access to resources that were denied then.

The dreamers embraced the dream of Martin Luther King, Jr. that their children would be free of the racial boundaries that confined Blacks in every aspect of their lives during segregation and the Jim Crow laws. They were the embodiment of the character content and color-blind dream of MLK.

Nonetheless, life was challenging for the children of the dreamers. Black students on White campuses during the 1960s and 70s often functioned within an environment of tension, miscommunication, and assumptions among both college and university leadership and the White student body. Black students were often viewed through the stereotypical lens of academically less prepared, less motivated, and less qualified. Yet there was still the belief among the children of the dream that anything was possible. This generation of children grew up possessing something that no generation of Blacks before them had ever experienced: a sense of entitlement and a belief in the right to equal access. The children of the dream had internalized the dream of their parents and grandparents before them.

Black women of the children of the dream went on to graduate in record numbers from White colleges and universities including women’s colleges such as Simmons, Wellesley and Barnard. They have risen to leadership of major corporations and in professions such as media, education, medicine, social work, public health, and law. They are among the first generation middle-class in substantial numbers to break the glass ceilings in corporate America, and own homes in integrated neighborhoods. Many have defied the odds and accomplished notable career achievements and national recognition. The success of the benefactors of the Civil Rights Movement has been remarkable, but it doesn’t stop there. The benefactors of the Civil Rights Movement – the Women of the Dream –have a moral and social responsibility to use their success to empower and inspire a new generation of African-American girls.

Leslie A. Morris

Leslie Morris is a native of Long Branch, NJ. She grew up in the Seaview Manor public housing complex under the watchful eyes of powerful men and women of faith, integrity, and character. She is the daughter of the late Nathaniel and Christine Morris, granddaughter of the late Susie Newsom and Lester and Sarah Morris, and sibling of Randy Phillips, Carol and Rodney Morris, all of Long Branch.

Leslie received a B.A. from Simmons College, a master’s degree in Social Work from Boston College, and a master’s degree in Public Health in the area of maternal and child health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Leslie has spent most of her career in community-based health care at the local, statewide and national levels. In 1987 she developed and implemented the first comprehensive school-based health center in the state of New Jersey. Under the auspices of the Jersey City Medical Center and Jersey City Community Health Center, Leslie served as director of the school-based health center for 12 years. While there she distinguished herself in several ways.

Following 12 years in Jersey City, NJ, she was called to work on a national level at the National Association of Community Health Centers in Washington, D.C. There she served for five years as director of the Adolescent and School Health Initiative funded by the Centers for Disease Control. In this position she provided training, technical assistance, consultation and resources to the nation’s network of community health centers that sponsor school-based health centers. Leslie’s position enabled her to travel throughout the country and Puerto Rico where she assisted health centers in the development and implementation of school-based health centers. She has written and published extensively in the areas of school-based and adolescent health care. She founded one of the nation’s first school-based HIV testing programs and implemented a nationally recognized teen abstinence program that was featured on both the CBS Evening News and CBS This Morning.  Later she worked on a five-year national school-based health project in Washington, DC.  Currently she is the director of community relations for the New Jersey Primary Care Association.

Upon completion of the five-year project in Washington, D.C., Leslie assisted two community health centers in New Jersey in the development and implementation of programs and services targeting high-risk populations. For the past 7-years, Leslie has served as Director of Community Relations at the New Jersey Primary Care Association in Hamilton, NJ. The NJPCA is a non-profit corporation that represents the network of community health centers in New Jersey. This position entails collaborating with state officials on key health policy issues affecting the network of community health centers, providing training to health center providers, advocating for ongoing financial support for community health centers, and developing public relations efforts aimed at consumers and legislators promoting the value of community health centers. More recently, through her current position, she has been assigned to work with the network of health centers on the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, better known as “Obamacare.”

In addition to her position at New Jersey Primary Care Association, Leslie is a frequent workshop presenter, keynote speaker, and consultant both statewide and nationally.

In 2007, Leslie released her first book entitled, “How Ya Like Me Now!” which is an inspirational autobiography that provides vivid snapshots into her life’s journey as a child growing up in public housing in Long Branch, NJ. Ms. Morris has used the book as a platform to inspire and motivate young people on their own journey to success.

 

Adunni Slackman Anderson

 

Adunni Slackman Anderson has lived and worked in a variety of professional and educational settings.  Prior to her 22-year career as a principal in New Jersey, she worked for community-based programs and in higher educational at noted universities.  Currently, Adunni is the Primary School Director of Kent Place School—a private, non-sectarian, and independent school for girls located in Summit, New Jersey.

 

Dr. Slackman Anderson earned her Doctorate in Education from Seton Hall University in Education Management, Leadership, and Policy. She received her B.A. and M.A. degrees, graduating with distinction and as a member of The Academy, from Simmons College. She also earned a post-masters certificate of advanced graduate studies from Harvard University’s School of Education, specializing in Learning Environments.  Simmons honored her with the 2013 Professional Leadership Award.

 

Beverly Byron

 

Beverly Byron is a certified Legal Nurse Consultant and CEO of Bev Byron Consulting Services, LLC.  Her area of expertise is Pediatric Abusive Head Trauma, Sports Concussions, and Traumatic Brain Injuries.  She is an Adjunct Professor of Nursing, teaching graduate level courses at Washington Adventist University, School of Nursing.

 

In 2010 she retired from Montgomery County Government having conceptualized and implemented Maryland’s first Shaken Baby Prevention-Awareness Education Program in 1997.  A retired Lieutenant Colonel, she served 28 years with the U.S. Army Reserves Nurse Corps.

 

Beverly has B.A. degrees in Nursing and Sociology from Simmons College, and a master’s degree and Pediatric Clinical Specialist certification from Boston University.

 

Faye E. Coleman

 

Faye E. Coleman, Ph.D, is an internationally recognized trainer and planner with over 35 years of experience managing large-scale training, technical assistance, and behavioral health projects for diverse Federal Government and corporate clients.  In 1984, she founded Westover Consultants, Inc.  (Westover), and has since guided the company’s steady emergence as a widely respected, multi-million dollar enterprise serving public and private sector clients, both nationally and internationally.  A recipient of numerous prestigious awards and a sought-after public speaker, Dr. Coleman was recently named one of the Washington, DC area’s top 25 Minority Business Leaders by the Washington Business Journal.

 

Listed in Who’s Who of American Women, Dr. Coleman holds a B.S. degree from Simmons College, a M.Ed. from the University of Massachusetts, and a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland.

 

Sharon Combs

 

Sharon Combs’ career spans 36 years of nonprofit experience, most notably as Vice President, Knowledge and Advocacy, at the New York City headquarters of Nonprofit Finance Fund—a national leader in social enterprise finance, focusing on the capitalization needs of nonprofit organizations.  Since 2011, Sharon has provided Executive Coach services to nonprofit leaders who are highly committed to uncovering and achieving transformative change in their professional and personal lives.

 

Sharon received her Ed.M. and M.A. in Applied Human Development and Guidance from Columbia University, Teachers College; B.A. in Psychology from Simmons College; and Certification as a Professional Co-Active Coach from The Coaches Training Institute.

 

Audrey Compton

 

Dr. Audrey Compton is a Quality Patient Safety Manager at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, an attending physician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center and an assistant professor in clinical medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

 

Dr. Compton received a nursing degree from Simmons College, a medical degree from Tufts University School of Medicine, also in Boston, and a master’s in Public Health from the Columbia University School of Public Health.  Dr. Compton completed her medical internship and residency training at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia, and is board certified in internal medicine.

 

Dellena Cunningham

 

Dr. Dellena Cunningham is a seasoned clinical psychologist who has had experience establishing and delivering a wide array of clinical services to youth and their families.  As a whole, her experiences represent the myriad activities associated with the planning of long-term changes to service systems and offering treatment and support services impacting those with notable mental illness.

 

Dr. Cunningham received her A.B. in Psychology from Simmons College and both her master’s and doctorate degrees in Clinical Psychology at Howard University.  She is a licensed Clinical Psychologist in both Washington, DC and Maryland.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pamela Dashiell

 

Judge Pamela Dashiell is an Associate Justice of the Trial Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the Boston Municipal Court Department (BMC).  In this position she hears criminal and civil matters within the jurisdiction of the BMC.  Prior to her appointment to the Bench, she served as the Director of Planning and Policy Development for the Administrative Office of the Trial Court where she was responsible for the development of new plans and initiatives to improve the management and operations of the trial Court.

 

Judge Dashiell is a graduate of Simmons College and Northwestern University School of Law.

 

Kathie Davidson

 

Judge Kathie Davidson was elected as a Family Court Judge in November 2003, and became the first African American woman elected to Westchester County Family Court.  In 2007, Judge Davidson made history again. She became the first African American woman appointed as the Supervising Judge of the Family Courts in the Ninth Judicial District.  Judge Davidson currently presides, not only over Family Court matters, but also over Special Immigrant Status Motions.  Previously Judge Davidson was with the Westchester County Law Department as a Deputy County Attorney.

 

Judge Davidson received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Simmons College and her Juris Doctorate from Howard University School of Law in Washington, DC.

 

Valerie Robinson Durant

 

Valerie Robinson Durant received her bachelor’s degree in Nursing from Simmons College, Valerie then attended the nurse anesthesia specialty program at the Duke University School of Nursing in Durham, NC.  She is a certified registered nurse anesthetist.  Following graduation from Duke University, Valerie worked as a nurse anesthetist at hospitals in the Washington, DC area before joining the U.S. Navy in 1984.  She served 20 years as a nurse anesthetist in the U.S. Navy, retiring in 2004 as Lieutenant Commander.  Currently Valerie is a nurse anesthetist at the Maryland General Hospital in Baltimore.

 

Catherine Eagan

 

Catherine Eagan is an experienced and trusted voice in the financial community.  Her passion is to teach people how to gain increased financial intelligence and effectively manage money regardless of global economic challenges.  As CEO and President of Catherine Eagan Enterprises, she heads two of its primary entities; Eagan Financial Group and the Wealthy Women Network.  This best-selling author has conducted Wealthy Women Networking Conferences in China, British West Indies, Brussels, Belgium, Paris and Canada.

 

This Harvard University and Simmons College graduate has achieved a number of impressive firsts including becoming the first African American private banker and officer at one of the Midwest’s largest banks.

 

Merilyn D. Francis

 

Merilyn Francis is currently a Principal Health Care Advisor for the MITRE Corporation’s Center for Transforming Healthcare McLean, Virginia.  In her over thirty years in health policy she has had a long standing focus on programs advancing equity in the access to and quality of care for healthcare consumers.  For the past three years Merilyn has served as chair of the Zonta Club of Washington DC Scholarship Committee which provides undergraduate scholarships to young women with financial need.  She is also active in community-based programs.

 

Merilyn received her master’s in Public Policy from the American University in Washington, DC, her B.S.N. from the University of the District of Columbia and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics from Simmons College.

 

Millicent Gorham

 

Millicent Gorham has more than 30 years of government relations experience.  For four years she worked as the health legislative assistant to U.S. Representative Louis Stokes, (D-OH).  She was the coordinator of the Congressional Black Caucus Health Brain Trust and continues to serve on the steering committee of the CBC Health Brain Trust.  For the past 17 years, she has served as the Executive Director of the National Black Nurses Association, Inc., which represents 150,000 African American nurses in the United States.

 

Millicent received a Masters in Business Administration from Howard University and a B.A. in Business Management from Simmons College.  In May 2011, Simmons College awarded Millicent and honorary doctorate in nursing.  In 2011, she was also inducted as an honorary fellow into the American Academy of Nursing.

 

Jo Ellen Gray

 

Dr. Jo Ellen Gray has over 35 years of experience in higher education, local and state government, and the private sector.  For the past 20 years, she has worked in a number of senior-level positions in human resources for local and state governments, most recently with D.C. Government and Howard County Maryland Government.  Dr. Gray previously served on the faculty at The Johns Hopkins University School of Business and also chaired the Management Department.

 

Dr. Gray received a B.A. in Mass Communications from Simmons College, an M.A. in Mass Communications, and an Ed.D. in Organization Development from the University of Maryland.

 

Vanessa Greene

 

Vanessa Greene has had a thirty-year career as both a non-profit leader and entrepreneur.  Vanessa is the CEO of Global Arts/Media Development, which she founded in 1987.  Global Arts/Media works with government, business and the not-for-profit sector to plan, design and develop arts and cultural initiatives that contribute to the economic development or revitalization of neighborhoods and communities.

 

Vanessa holds a B.A. from Simmons College and an Executive M.B.A. from Queens University in Charlotte, North Carolina.

 

Robin Grimes

 

Robin Grimes has over thirty years of clinical laboratory supervisory and management experience.  Robin is also the sole proprietor of a clinical and technical laboratory consultation service, RLAB Consulting.

 

Robin Grimes has a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology from Simmons College and a dual master’s degree in Business Administration and Health Care Management from the University of Phoenix.

 

Marilyn Harris

 

Marilyn Harris is employed as the Administrative Director of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine for Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, NJ where she is responsible for the day to day operations and strategic development of the Clinical Laboratory.  Additionally, Marilyn serves as the Pastor of First Baptist Church of Teaneck in Teaneck, New Jersey where she has initiated and implemented a number of ministries which reflect the diverse membership of First Baptist Teaneck and the community-at-large.

 

Marilyn earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology from Simmons College, a Master of Business Administration degree from Rutgers University Graduate School of Management and a Master of Divinity degree from New York Theological Seminary in New York.

 

Ann Hayward

 

Ann Hayward is currently an independent consultant to small businesses and non-profit organizations.  In addition, she continues to write, produce and direct audiovisual productions for commercial and public broadcasting, and recently received a national award as writer/producer for a radio series that aired on NPR/PRI.

 

Ann graduated with a B.A. in American History and Government from Simmons College and has completed 60 hors towards a Doctorate in Public Administration at NYU.  She holds a postgraduate Certificate in Journalism as a John S. Knight Fellow from Stanford University and a Certificate in Film Direction from the Directing Workshop for Women at the American Film Institute in Los Angeles.

 

Claudia Herbert

                              

Claudia Herbert was appointed ethics and compliance officer for IBM Corporation’s Federal Marketing unit in June, 2009.  She has over 30 years experience in staff and management roles in human resources, contract negotiations, and business process reengineering at IBM.

 

Claudia received her B.A. in Sociology from Simmons College, M.S. in Program Planning and Administration from Columbia University School of Social Work and M.B.A. from Columbia University School of Business.

 

Karen Hill

 

Karen Hill brings over twenty years experience in the delivery, development and advocacy of housing services and related programs that stabilize communities and economic opportunity.  Currently, Karen is the President and CEO of the Harriet Tubman Home, a 32 acre parcel in Westchester County, NY featured in the “I Love New York” campaign.  The Tubman Home conducts historic cultural tours reflecting on Tubman’s life including the Tubman Residence in Auburn, NY where Harriet Tubman lived for more than half of her 93 years.

 

Karen received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Government from Simmons College.

 

Cheryl E. Howard

 

Cheryl Howard, Vice President of Marketing and Admission at Simmons College joined Simmons in 2007.  She oversees recruiting and admission work for all undergraduate and graduate programs as well as internal and external communications, PR, publications, online marketing, the website, advertising and the annual Leadership Conference.  For the previous 23 years, Howard served in a number of positions at the Gillette Company and at Digital Equipment Corporation.

 

Cheryl hold a B.A. from Simmons College, as well as a D.B.A. and M.B.A. from Harvard University.

 

 

Yvonne Johnson

 

Yvonne Johnson received her bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education with a minor in Art from Simmons College, and a master’s degree in Education from Harvard University Graduate School of Education.  Yvonne spent 31 years in the education arena in the cities of Boston and Cambridge.

 

She retired from teaching in 2003, and is currently an education consultant and community volunteer.

 

 

Leonade Jones

 

Leonade Jones is a director of several mutual funds in the American Funds Group, whose investments are managed by Capital Research and Management Company.  For over twenty years, Ms. Jones worked in senior management with The Washington Post Company concluding with tenure as treasurer.

 

Leonade earned a J.D./M.B.A from Stanford Law School and the Graduate School of Business after graduating from Simmons College with a B.A. with distinction.

 

 

LaVerne Cowan Kumeh

 

LaVerne Cowan Kumeh holds a B.A. in education from Simmons College.  She worked for 23 years at Horizon Blue Cross and Blue Shield in New Jersey, primarily in information Systems as technical trainer, support manager and senior project manager. Currently retired, LaVerne has served as senior program manager for Travelguard and NASCO, where she had oversight of major system implementation.

 

LaVerne holds professional certifications as Project Management Professional, Managed Healthcare Professional, Six Sigma Green Belt and Life Skills Educator.  She also earned a graduate certificate in Healthcare Management Systems from New Jersey Institute of Technology.  LaVerne is a court-appointed advocate for foster children and is pursuing a master’s degree in Worship Studies.

 

Ngina Lythcott

 

Dr. Ngina Lythcott has 40 years of experience working with urban Black and Latino communities in planning and implementing health promotion and disease prevention interventions that address chronic disease.  She is a 25 year breast cancer survivor who serves as the Breast Cancer Liaison for the Black Women’s Health Imperative.  She has served as dean of students at Dartmouth and Swarthmore Colleges and at Columbia and Boston Universities.

 

Dr. Lythcott earned a bachelor’s degree in Nrsing from Simmons College, a graduate degree in Clinical Social Work from Smith College, and master’s and doctoral degrees in Public Health from the University of California, Los Angeles.  She has earned an honorary doctoral degree from Simmons College where she is also on the Board of Trustees.

 

 

Patricia Phipps

 

Dr. Patricia Phipps graduated from Simmons College with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology.  She then attended and graduated from Cornell University with a B.S.N. in Nursing, and then received a diploma in anesthesia from Harlem Hospital School of Nurse Anesthesia.  Patricia spent the next 20 years working with acutely ill and chronically ill patients as a nurse anesthetist at various hospitals in the New York City and Atlanta metropolitan areas.

 

Dr. Phipps returned to school to follow her lifelong dream of becoming a dentist.  She graduated from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in Boston in 2003, nearly 30 years after graduating from Simmons College.

 

Carol Waller Pope

 

Carol Waller Pope serves as Member and Chairman of the Federal Labor Relations Authority.  She was first appointed to serve as the Member by President Clinton and confirmed by the U.S. Senate in 2000.  She has served successive terms as Member since that time as appointees of both President George W. Bush and President Barack H. Obama.  She was first designated Chairman and CEO of the FLRA by President Obama in 2009.  Pope is also a former Trustee of Simmons College and former President of Simmons’ Alumnae Association and African-American Alumnae Association.

Chairman Pope earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Simmons College, and a Juris Doctor degree from Northeastern University School of Law.

 

Jo-Anna L. Rorie

 

Dr. Jo-Anna L. Rorie received a degree in Nursing from Simmons College, and is the recipient of the 2009 Distinguished Alumna Award from the Simmons College School for Health Studies.  She is a practicing Certified Nurse Midwife and Associate Professor of Maternal and Child Health, and Director of the Training and Education Core of the Partners in Health and Housing, Prevention Research Center at Boston University School of Public Health.

 

Dr. Rorie received her doctorate in Social Policy from Brandeis University and is also a graduate of the Harvard University School of Public Health and Yale University Nurse-Midwifery Program.

 

Karen Young-Thomas

 

Dr. Karen Young-Thomas was one of the founders of The Marion P. Thomas Charter School in Newark, New Jersey and now serves as its CEO.  Prior to coming to the Marion P. Thomas Charter School, Karen was the Marketing Director for ESSENCE magazine.  Throughout her 20 years of service to ESSENCE she created and prodced innovative marketing programs including The ESSENCE Awards and the ESSENCE Music Festival, the largest gathering of African Americans annually held at the Superdome in New Orleans.

 

Dr. Young-Thomas has a B.A. in Communications from Simmons College, and M.A. in Educational Leadership and a Doctorate in Urban Leadership both from Kean University in New Jersey.

 

 

 

Katherine Hicks White

 

Kathy Hicks White has been a member of Pennsylvania’s Rose Tree Media School District family since 1989.  She began her teaching career in Rose Tree Media School District twenty-two years ago in a third grade classroom at Glenwood Elementary School.  Currently Kathy is the Assistant Principal of Springton Lake Middle School in Media, PA.

 

Kathy earned her bachelor’s degree in Elementary and Early Childhood Education from Simmons College and a master’s degree and principal certification at Gwynedd-Mercy College in Gwynedd Valley, PA.

 

Patricia N. Whitley-Williams

 

Dr. Patricia N. Whitley-Williams is currently Professor of Pediatrics and Chair of the Department of Pediatrics, as well as Chief of the Division of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology and Infectious Diseases at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

 

Dr. Whitley-Williams received a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Simmons College and an M.D. degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  She completed her pediatric residency at Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati and fellowship training in pediatric infectious diseases at Boston City Hospital/Boston University School of Medicine.  She has dedicated her career to providing specialty care for HIV infected children/adolescents and their families.

 

JoAnne Wright

 

JoAnne Wright joined the Xerox Corporation in 1986.  During her 26-year career, she haeld multiple roles including Process Improvement Project Manager, Global Account General Manager and Dales and Operation Manager in which she achieved President’s Club status for top performers.

 

JoAnne earned a B.A. in Education with a minor in Psychology from Simmons College, a M.S. in Social Work Administration from Columbia University School of Social Work.  Through Xerox, JoAnne earned a Graduate Certificate in Human Resource Management from Cornell University and in 2011 achieved certification as a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt.

 

Laurel Guild Yancey

 

Laurel Guild Yancey earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications and Business Administration from Simmons College, and her Juris Doctorate from Boston College Law School.  She is an attorney admitted and in good standing to practice law in the State of Georgia, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and before the U.S. Supreme Court.

 

Laurel has a private law practice in Atlanta, Georgia and has received numerous industry awards and honors.  Her legal expertise is in information, communications and technology law, project management, regulatory compliance, and licensing.

 

CLOSE

The Women of the Dream thanks the Campbell Soup Company under the executive leadership of Denise Morrison for its time and financial resources to insure the ongoing development of the Women of the Dream as an avenue to educate, empower and inspire a new generation of African-American girls.

 

Founded in 1899, Simmons College (simmons.edu) is a nationally recognized university located in Boston with a history of visionary thinking and social responsibility. It offers undergraduate education for women and the nation’s first MBA program designed specifically for women. It also features renowned coeducational graduate programs in nursing and health sciences; liberal arts, including education and behavior analysis; library and information science; social work; and business. Follow us on Twitter at @SimmonsCollege and @SimmonsNews.

 

Donate

For the past 25 years I have been blessed to work in community-based healthcare aimed at improving the lives of vulnerable children, women and families. For 13 years, I was director of an adolescent school-based health center at Snyder High School in Jersey City, NJ. Under the auspices of a federally-qualified health center, the school-based program provided the full range of medical, reproductive health, and mental health services to a predominantly poor and African-American student population. Having grown up in a single parent household in public housing, I could not have asked for a better opportunity to direct a program for young people with whom I closely identify.

I have been blessed with yet another opportunity to give back through the Women of the Dream. The mission of the WOD is to educate and empower African-American girls to make healthy choices in every aspect of their lives by providing personal growth and development services through one-on-one and group mentoring, workshops, and career development programs. This is an important undertaking given the challenges African-American girls face in current society.

We cannot fulfill our mission without resources. Please consider making a donation today. To whom much is given, much is required.

Thank you.
Leslie A. Morris
Founder and Executive Director
Women of the Dream

For more information email Leslie Morris at leslie.morris@womenofthedream.org or call 609-668-1120

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A Coffin in Egypt Starring Frederica von Stade Closes Its East Coast Premier in Philadelphia June 15

 

New chamber opera by composer Ricky Ian Gordon is the third production in Opera Philadelphia’s American Repertoire Program

 

“Frederica von Stade creates a ravishing heroine who is part Scarlett O'Hara, part Aurora Greenway, but always wholly human.”The Houston Press

Legendary mezzo-soprano Frederica von Stade has performed many of opera’s greatest roles in her storied career that began in 1970.  In June, she makes her Opera Philadelphia debut in an incredible new role written just for her, in the East Coast Premiere of A Coffin in Egypt by composer Ricky Ian Gordon and librettist/director Leonard Foglia.

 

A Coffin in Egypt is a chamber opera in one act, based on the play of the same name by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Horton Foote (1916-2009).  Co-commissioned and co-produced by Houston Grand Opera, Opera Philadelphia, and The Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, it tells the story of 90-year-old grand dame Myrtle Bledsoe (von Stade), who has outlived her philandering husband, Hunter (actor David Matranga, who ages 40 years during the course of the opera), her daughters, and virtually everyone else in Egypt, Texas.  In this tale of adultery, deception, murder, and lost beauty, Myrtle is determined to finally free herself of all the anger, resentment, and hate that has ruled her life.

 

Performed in English with English supertitles, the 80-minute opera was hailed as “a splendid opera” by The Los Angeles Times. The beloved Flicka, as von Stade is known, never leaves the stage as she reflects on her life in a tour-de-force performance, accompanied by four actors and a quartet of gospel singers heard from an African-American church adjacent to the Bledsoe plantation in Egypt, Texas, where the cathartic events of Myrtle's life play out.. The audience initially believes it is settling in for a quaint chat with a sweet old lady; instead we are taken on a deep journey with a wounded but noble heart, getting to know a character not always sympathetic but ultimately understandable.

“We are delighted that Frederica von Stade believed so strongly in this piece that she was willingly lured out of retirement to take on the role of Myrtle Bledsoe,” said David B. Devan, General Director and President of Opera Philadelphia. “As the third opera from our American Repertoire Program, our commitment to present one new American opera per year for ten seasons, A Coffin in Egypt tells a uniquely American story.

 

Ricky Ian Gordon has written a diverse range of works, from a grand opera based on Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath to a quartet of small-scale musicals with Tina Landau, to the moving chamber opera Green Sneakers, scored for string quartet and an empty chair. When I read Horton Foote’s play A Coffin in Egypt, I thought it was kind of gothic,” said the composer. “It felt immediately like the ‘stuff’ of opera. I’ve heard Flicka’s voice since I was a child—she’s been singing since I grew to love singing—so it was easy to write for her. The piece fits her like a glove.”

 

Librettist and director Leonard Foglia worked closely with the late playwright Horton Foote on a number of plays, and he championed the idea of turning A Coffin in Egypt into an opera. Foote, a native of Wharton, Texas, was a prolific playwright who wrote 52 plays and won two Academy Awards for his screenplays for Tender Mercies and To Kill a Mockingbird. Foote’s 1953 play, The Trip to Bountiful, was recently revived on Broadway starring Cicely Tyson, who won the 2013 Best Actress Tony Award. The Trip to Bountiful shares some qualities with A Coffin in Egypt: both focus on an elderly female protagonist; both are set only a few miles from Houston, and both are infused with Foote's characteristic honesty and uniquely Texan banter.

I had the great privilege of working with Horton when I directed the play version of A Coffin in Egypt in 1998,” said Foglia. “It was an invaluable experience having him by my side as we explored the character of Myrtle Bledsoe and her need to find meaning in her long life.”

 

The Aurora Series is generously underwritten by the Wyncote Foundation. The production is underwritten in part by the Aaron Copeland Fund for Music.

 

 

 

Opera Philadelphia is committed to embracing innovation and developing opera for the 21st century. The company’s American Repertoire Program produces an American opera in ten consecutive seasons.   The first opera in the initiative was Dark Sisters by Nico Muhly and a libretto by Stephen Karam, performed as part of the Aurora Series at the Perelman Theater in June 2012. Dark Sisters was co-commissioned with New York's Gotham Chamber Opera and Music-Theatre Group. The most recent work in the American Repertoire Program was Silent Night, a co-production with the Minnesota Opera, featuring music by composer Kevin Puts, for which he won the 2012 Pulitzer Prize in Music, with a libretto by Mark Campbell.  Additional announced co-commissions include A Coffin in Egypt by Ricky Ian Gordon with a libretto by Leonard Foglia, scheduled for the Aurora Series for Chamber Opera at the Perelman Theater in June 2014; Oscar by Theodore Morrison, with a libretto by the composer and John Cox, slated for the Academy of Music in 2015; and Cold Mountain by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Jennifer Higdon with a libretto by Gene Scheer, at the Academy of Music in February 2016. Both Oscar and Cold Mountain are co-commissioned and co-produced with The Santa Fe Opera.  The World Premiere of Charlie Parker’s YARDBIRD by Daniel Schnyder, with a libretto by Bridgette Wimberly, will be presented in the Aurora Series for Chamber Opera at the Perelman Theater in June 2015, marking Opera Philadelphia’s first World Premiere in the American Repertoire Program. For more information, visit www.operaphila.org

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MARTIN LUTHER KING MEMORIAL DEDICATION, WASHINGTON, DC

“Celebrating The Life, The Dream, The Legacy”

23 Hours That Changed My Life Forever

Washington, DC – August 26-28, 2011 our nation paid tribute to the greatest civil rights leader of all time, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., with a week-long celebration honoring the life, the dream and the legacy of Dr. King.

Harry E. Johnson, Sr., President and CEO Washington DC, Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation, Inc, led the charge on this $120 million project that gained the financial support of 117 major corporations and foundations including General Motors and Tommy Hilfiger which both contributed more than $1,000,000 each.

23 Hours That Changed My Life Forever

Day 1, Honoring Global Leaders for Peace

Arriving in Washington on the evening of Wednesday August 26, 2011, at the Washington Convention Center  just in time for the commencement gala, “Honoring Global Leaders for Peace”, offered the feeling that I was about to be a part of an event that was like no other.

While in the Grand Lobby I was able to unite with two colleagues, Bishop Keith J. Martin, Rehoboth Rebirth Restoration Ministry and Stephanie Lynn Moore, Primerica Financial Services.  As we walked down the stairs into the grand ballroom of the Exhibit Hall, the staff lined the entrance as you walked the “Red Carpet” while the waiters and waitresses offered you Champagne, water or a specialty beverage. Turning the corner were several tall tables for mingling with dignitaries from around the world during an h'ordeuvres and cocktail reception.

As the people moved to the seating area, NBC News anchor Andrea Mitchell, Mistress of Ceremony began by calling the Honorable Suzan Johnson Cook, US Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom, to do the invocation.  Following the invocation were remarks from Flagship sponsors, Eric Peterson, US Vice President for Diversity General Motors, Guy Vickers, President Tommy Hilfiger Corporate Foundation and Myrtle Potter, Board Member MEDCO Health Solutions, Inc.

Following the remarks, Bishop Desmond Tutu, graced us with a greeting and message on global peace. Following the greeting, Ambassador Ebrahim Rasool, South Africa gave remarks as we prepared for dinner.

During dinner, Harry E. Johnson, Jr. the visionary who put this event together shared remarks and paved the way for remarks from, the Honorable Ron Kirk, US Trade Representative and the Honorable Madeleine Albright, former US Secretary of State.

To conclude the evening was an entertainment selection by Idan Raichel, musician from Israel who after the first selection was accompanied by India Arie, award winning musician. These two are currently working to release a new project in Israel.

As people prepared themselves to leave for the evening, the announcer convinced everyone to remain to hear final remarks from world renowned musical legend, Stevie Wonder.  Stevie shared his heart felt feelings of the MLK Memorial and his appreciation to the King family and foundation. Afterwards he sat at the grand piano and graced the room of world leaders and dignitaries with a musical selection.

Afterwards, the Honorable Suzan Johnson Cook, accompanied by Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr. and Ambassador for Global Peace Andrew Young, gave the benediction. Following the benediction people continued to mingle, network and share while news reporters from around the world interviewed and captured the moment.  

 

The Honorable Suzan Johnson Cook, accompanied by Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr. 
and Ambassador for Global Peace Andrew Young

Day 2 Honoring Civil Rights Leaders Past, Present and Future

Arriving back at the Washington Convention Center the next day for a noon day luncheon honoring civil rights leaders of the past, present and future, had me wondering who I’d be able to connect with. Once again my team was ready for action after experiencing such high energy just a few hours prior.

As we sat in the back of the exhibit hall, a representative of the foundation recognized Bishop Martin and escorted us front and center to sit at the table with Julian Bond, Civil Rights extraordinaire who was one of the only eight students of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at Morehouse College. Also sitting at the table were Guy Vickers, President Tommy Hilfiger Corporate Foundation and his wife.

Mixed greens including cucumber, tomato, root vegetable confetti with creamy balsamic dressing set the tone for the stuffed half chicken coupled with charred shrimp, roasted fingerlings, green beans, roasted bell peppers, brandy onion marmalade, port sage jus and yellow rice. Putting the perfect ending on the meal was apple pie.

The Honorable Marc Morial, President and CEO, National Urban League, was the master of ceremony for the luncheon. As Morial introduced individuals to give remarks, the audience tuned in as Martin Luther King, Jr. III shared his feelings of the dedication to his father and repeating a statement that his mother, Coretta Scott-King, always told him, “You should be ashamed to die unless you did something to make an impact in the world.”

Afterwards, Barbara Conrad rendered a musical selection that was followed by remarks from, Thomas Harvey, SVP AT&T Government Solutions and the Honorable Eric Holder, US Attorney General. Recording Artist Christopher Williams rendered a musical selection which set the tone for remarks from the following: Scott Mills, President and COO, BET; the Honorable Sheila Jackson Lee, US Congresswoman; Actress Victoria Rowell, “Young and the Restless”; Janet Murguia, President and CEO, Council of LaRaza; and Reverend Jesse L. Jackson, Sr. who gave tribute to the staff workers that assisted Dr. King during the movement.

Julian Bond, shared remarks about his personal experiences with Dr. King as did William H. Gray, III, Dorothy Cotton and Reverend Dr. Amos Brown, who was one of the only eight students personally taught by Dr. King.

During the remarks from BET, a slideshow was featured showing footage of Dr. King in the struggle.  The exhibit hall remained quiet as you could feel the chills racing down your arms through the tips of your fingers.  You could feel the presence of Dr. Martin Luther King being in the room.

Harry E. Johnson, Sr. gave the closing remarks and once again, people mingled, networked and shared as news reporters captured the moment. Many people went into another exhibit hall where the MLK Dedication Expo was going on. The Expo had vendors and merchandise from around the world as well as various performances from local artists.

I had the opportunity to explore the expo and talk with many of the vendors as well as several dignitaries that explored too.  Martin Luther King, Jr. III, walked around the exhibit hall speaking with community people and thanking vendors.  I wondered what went through his mind as he sees all of the many displays and merchandise honoring his father.

The most impressive exhibit came from Legacy, the magazine that features information about our African American heritage and legacy.  They had a tractor trailer that was molded into a MLK Exhibit showcasing various items and documentaries with Dr. King.

Several of us sat in front of a video screen to watch footage never before seen.  They showed a discussion Dr. King had with his colleagues while driving in a car.  Dr. King spoke of how he was scared during a certain event and joked about how those that were with him, prayed with their eyes open that day.  The same footage later took us to the sanctuary of the church in Memphis, TN where he gave his final speech the night before his assassination. The words scrolled across the video screen so we could read and follow as Dr. King’s voice recited it. The exhibit was so quiet and intense during this portion we could once again feel as if Dr. King was right there.

 During his delivery he recited these words,Well, I don't know what will happen now.  We've got some difficult days ahead. But it doesn't matter with me now because I've been to the mountaintop, and I don't mind. Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I'm not concerned about that now. I just want to do God's will, and He's allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I've looked over. And I've seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people will get to the Promised Land. And I'm happy, tonight. I'm not worried about anything. I do not fear any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.”

As you heard this, although it has been 43 years ago, you felt like you were sitting right there in the sanctuary.  As we walked out of the Legacy exhibit, no one could even speak a word. In fact, your body continued to tingle all over from the powerful presence of Dr. King.  

 

India Arie

 

Harry E. Johnson, Sr. and Stevie Wonder

Day 2 Evening Celebrating the Message in the Music

Arriving back at the Washington Convention Center for a special evening of music with a purpose, “The message in the Music”, gave us the opportunity to be up close and personal with some of the music industry’s top artists and hosted by, Wren Troy Brown, Master of Ceremony.

Anthony Hamilton, Naturally 7, Nolan Williams, Jr. and the Voices of Inspiration, Ray Chew Live with Musical Director Ray Chew and the Impressions.  Andrew Young once mentioned that the “Impressions” were the voice of the Civil Rights Movement. The Impressions sang their famous song, “The Train Is Coming So Get On Board”.

Just when you thought it was over, the best was yet to come as each artists turned the energy level up higher and higher.  India Arie, graced the stage singing in Hebrew accompanied by pianist Idan Raichel. Ms Arie also played her flute as she shared with us that she never knew that her grandmother, a former housemaid, attended the “I Have A Dream”, speech during the march on Washington, DC.

Following India Arie was 1/3 of the legendary group, “The O’Jays”, Mr. Eddie Levert. The audience of dignitaries went crazy as Levert graced the stage with high energy. The thought was then, who could be next?  After a performance of such magnitude only certain artists could even qualify to follow. The master of ceremony, Wren Troy Brown announced, “From the city of Philadelphia, Ms. Patti LaBelle.”

Let me just say, “Patti LaBelle, was Patti LaBelle,” High energy and high heels. As Patti changed songs, she also changed her high heels to another color. She set the audience of dignitaries on fire when she graced the stage singing, “Over the Rainbow”. Even when her time was up, as she went back stage and as Wren Troy Brown asked us to give her another round of applause, Patti began singing from back stage. Suddenly, she returned to the stage kicking her high heels off into the audience and adlibbed a song about Dr. King.

Imagine the energy and impact of not just the concert but all of this happened during the first 23 hours of arriving in Washington, DC. It was so powerful that I remember taking an aspirin feeling that my brain could not handle any more at that time. I must say that at that point my life was changed.  Although I was not old enough to experience the civil rights movement like many of you, I was born in June 1968 after the assassination, but being amongst these icons and breaking bread with them, I felt like I was surely a part of it.

   

Dr. Maya Angelou

Day 3, Women Who Dare to Dream

As I arrived back at the Washington Convention for day three, I was ready to have an encounter with no other but the ever so wonderful Maya Angelou. The exhibit hall was incredibly decorated with 300 tables and arrangements to wow the audience.  3000 women gathered in one room to honor those of them who dared to dream during the civil rights movement.

The Honorable Alexis Herman, 23rd US Secretary of Labor was the Mistress of Ceremony. She called upon AME Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry to give the invocation followed by remarks from entrepreneur and philanthropist, Sheila C. Johnson; Mary Barra, SVP Global Product Development General Motors; Vivian Pickard, President General Motors Foundation, Phyllis P. Harris, SVP and Chief Compliance Officer and Rosalind Hudreil, Chief Diversity Officer, INTEL Corporation. Following the remarks was the moment we were all waiting for, the introduction of legendary author and poet, Dr. Maya Angelou.

Dr. Maya Angelou wrote a poem specifically for this event entitled, “Abundant Hope”. As she recited the poem, everyone could follow as it was also printed in their programs for the luncheon. Dr. Angelou received a standing ovation as well as a musical tribute from Ms. India Arie and Ledisi.

Additional remarks came from Gina F. Adams, SVP Government Affairs FEDEX Corporation; Daphne Maxwell-Reid, Actress “Vivian Banks on TV’s The Fresh Prince”; Xernona Clayton, Founder, CEO and President of the Trumpet Awards; Delores Huerta, VP United Farm Workers of America; The Honorable Connie Morella, US Congresswoman; Myrlie Evers-Williams, Civil Rights Activist and former wife of slain civil rights leader, Medgar Evers; Lisa P. Jackson, Environmental Protection Agency and Debra Lee, Chairman and CEO, BET Holdings, Inc.

As powerful as you could imagine having 3000 women in one location honoring their sisters who dared to dream, it was now time to hear from two women who were extremely close to Dr. King and his wife Coretta.

Christine King Farris, the sister of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. shared her feeling about the dedication to her brother and shared her experience of seeing him being born in the family home. She spoke of Dr. King, not as the civil rights leader but as her brother growing up in the home.

Afterwards, a woman took the podium with fire in her eyes, standing firm and scanning the exhibit hall as to look into the eyes of every woman there.  It was Bernice King, the daughter of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott-King.

Bernice King actually didn’t have to speak a word because everything that needed to be said could be seen in her eyes. However, as she did speak, you could hear every bit of her mother and father in her delivery and the sound of her voice.

Bernice talked about her mother and father as parents. She shared with us about the first time danger knocked on the door of the King’s home when her father was on the road fighting for civil rights. How her grandfather came to take Coretta and the children to safety but Coretta refused to go and said to her father, “I’m staying with Martin.” Bernice shared a story of an interview with Martin Luther King, Jr. and a news reporter who asked if Dr. King trained his wife for the things she was doing, to be able to stand with him. How Dr. King mentioned that his wife was more passionate about the Vietnam War than he was and that when he first began to date Coretta, she was already a part of the movement doing the work. In fact, it was Coretta Scott-King that pushed her husband Martin to do the things he did. Bernice explained that she and the other children did not have a choice whether or not to be a part of the civil rights movement because her mother and father made the choice for them.

Concluding the ceremony honoring women who dare to dream was R&B soloist Ms. Lalah Hathaway, the daughter of the late Donnie Hathaway. Lalah’s sang her father’s song that was a voice for the people during the movement, “Someday We’ll All Be Free”, followed by the benediction from Alpha Kappa Alpha Chaplain, Cynthia Hale.

The MLK Dedication week really inspired me to appreciate what Dr. King and many others have done while giving their lives so that we as a people could even have the opportunity to have an event such as this, bringing together people of all nationalities.  The Exhibit Halls, of the convention center, were filled with color from around the world.  These people didn’t have much money and resources during the times of the movement but they had each other and they had vision and purpose. They were mission driven.

Today our generation has money and substance but yet no togetherness. It’s every man for himself and no one helping to pull up another. Families are breaking apart because of tough economic times. Young men and women are turning to the streets for a different movement.

I say that it’s time to remember the life, the legacy, the dream and the people who fought for the very privileges that we have today. Let’s come back together as a people even greater than before.  If these dynamic leaders could change the global world by coming together with no resources, imagine what we can do with a portion of what we all have today.

The MLK Memorial Dedication event that was scheduled Sunday, August 28th has been rescheduled for October 16, 2011 in Washington, DC. I encourage everyone to be there for the celebration.  Take the time to come and see the Six Story Creation that sits on the mall.  Bring your family and share with your children an experience that will change their lives forever.

The nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal”, was proud to be amongst media from around the globe to provide in depth coverage of the MLK Memorial Dedication Week.  We salute Mr. Harry E. Johnson, Sr. for being the visionary behind the scene in bringing it all together. We look to see you in Washington, DC October 16, 2011 for the grand finale.

By Chris Collins  

 

Guy Vickers, President Tommy Hilfiger Corporate Foundation and his wife along 
with Stephanie Moore and Rev. Chris Collins of the Anointed News Journal

A Few Words from Sponsor Tommy Hilfigure

Growing up as one of nine children in Elmira, New York, clothing maker Tommy Hilfiger got an early lesson in wardrobes and sharing.

“My clothes were never my clothes,” Hilfiger said during an interview in his Manhattan office overlooking the Hudson River.  “Whichever one of my brothers got to a shirt fastest, got to wear it. We shared everything.”

Now he shares the wealth gained from the success of his preppy-with-a-twist clothing, which generated $4.6 billion in global retail sales last year (Hilfiger sold the company in 2006). One beneficiary is a memorial for Martin Luther King Jr.

The Tommy Hilfiger Corporate Foundation gave $6.25 million to the King Memorial project. Foundation President Guy Vickers, who serves as vice chairman of the memorial’s board, helped recruit donors to the $120 million undertaking. He and Hilfiger organized a 2007 benefit concert headlined by Aretha Franklin and Stevie Wonder that raised $2 million. Hilfiger’s charity served as co-chairman at the Aug. 28 dedication of the Washington D.C. Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial.

The memorial on the Washington Mall features a 28.5-foot granite sculpture of the civil-rights leader slain in 1968. It is surrounded by a wall inscribed with 14 of his most notable quotes.

The King project represents the largest philanthropic act from the designer, who launched his empire with a $150 investment and a line of bell-bottomed jeans in 1969. Hilfiger’s foundation was started in 1995 and has funded causes ranging from children’s issues to multiple sclerosis and cancer.

Boosting Village

In 2009, Hilfiger and Vickers pledged $2 million to Millennium Promise, an international campaign to aid Africa and cut extreme poverty in half by the year 2015. The Hilfiger Foundation supports a community in Ruhiira, Uganda, by aiding its food production, schools, health care and economic-development programs.

“We went to this village, and the people didn’t have running water or electricity,” Hilfiger said. “They don’t have wood to burn to cook the food.”

The son of a watchmaker, Hilfiger opened his first clothing shop, People’s Place, at age 18. He soon began donating slightly defective clothing to the needy.

After reconnecting in 1999 with Vickers, a former high-school classmate at the Elmira Free Academy, Hilfiger tapped him to lead the foundation.

“When I reconnected with Tommy and asked him what it was like being successful, I thought he was going to give me the juice about the private jets and the women,” Vickers said. “He looked at me and said, ‘The best thing about it is that I can help people.’ That’s when we started talking about building a legacy.”

A Few Words from Attendee and Educator Arthur Leo Taylor of Pennsauken, NJ

For nearly three years every other month, or so, I received a letter or postcard from the Build a Dream Foundation signed by Harry Johnson Jr. to ask me to donate money from twenty five dollars on up to a thousand toward the building of the Dr. Martin Luther King National Memorial in Washington, DC.  Every now and then I would drop a check for twenty-five dollars or fifty sometimes and receive a lapel pin, calendar or blue rubber bracelet.  I felt so compelled to donate because this was history that I would have a hand in making and because Dr. King was such a great man, I felt that he deserved not only a national holiday but a national memorial in DC that could truly honor his legacy in an international American city and if my pennies could move this project closer to its goal then so be it.

August 25, 2011: It was our hope that we would visit the memorial first and then hop over to the DC Convention Center to take part in the Partners in the Dream Expo; however the weather had other ideas.  After waiting nearly an eternity because the rain kept turning on and off like a faucet from heaven, I decided that we (my wife and three daughters) needed to just go down to the DC Convention Center, so we did.  I thought that if we just got there we could wait for a break in the clouds and head down to the memorial.  After another brief shower I got the car and we drove down to the closest spot near the Washington Monument and parked.  The excitement really started to build in me because I knew that even if it started to rain again that I would see an amazing site.  The clouds started to loom over again and threatened to tear their dark iridescence but they held out.  As we walked past the Washington Monument we joined the parade of curious folks who shared the same mission-get to the MLK Memorial before the rain fell as this was the last day to see it before the Sunday celebration that was threatened by a Hurricane traveling up the east coast (which would eventually cancel all activities around the dedication). We stopped briefly to pick up some brochures about the memorial and then turned and got pulled into the power of this astounding work of art.  As we traveled through the sectioned entrance I rubbed my hand over the carved granite as we entered the space cut between one large rocks, like an Egyptian tomb, only to come out on the other side where the wisdom of Dr. King was displayed without apology in an arc.  As I read each quote I moved to the next with anticipation at what would be written on the 30 foot image of Dr. King which read “I was a Drum Major for Justice, Peace and Righteousness”. And then Ohhh to behold his face!!! By scale his lips are larger than Dr. King’s were but I liked what it expressed, he was a man that had a lot to say and could move mountains with his speech.  The image of Dr. King hued out of what looks to be a mountain is simply breathtaking and I saw a few people with tears in their eyes as they marveled over this amazing carved stone.  There was no shortage of amateur photographers and their models had to have a shot near this Goliath sized man with the heart of David.  As we left the sacred ground I wondered how many millions of people would walk this path with their families, loved ones and friends to see this granite King of Dreams.

Arthur Leo Taylor
Pennsauken, NJ

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KING

On a brisk, bright morn in 1929,
Came a son of the south, ordained from above
Who would imagine that in just 39
He would change the world with the power of love

His name was Martin Luther King
Educated in the finest schools from north to south
He was known by his call “Let Freedom Ring!”
As he shouted with the words of his mouth

Leading his people through adversity he would rise
Marching for justice from Chicago to Birmingham
Took him to win the Nobel Peace Prize
And made him famous throughout the land

He shared with us his vision
To consider a person’s character, not skin
Change through non-violence was his mission
By using this method, we would all win

As we remember the man, this great King
Where is our commitment, where do we start?
Let us put meaning to the songs we sing
We find the answer in our very own HEART.

Written by Kirk L. Jones, United States Navy
While stationed in Scotland 1993

 If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.  

 

 

Leslie A. Morris, Author of “How Ya Like Me Now” 
Uses Life’s Experience to Empower Women 

 

 

From Juvenile Delinquent to Establishing National Curriculums Empowering Youth

Hamilton, NJ – Leslie A. Morris is a professional that has defied the odds of growing up in a poor urban community and overcoming the obstacles that the 60’s and 70’s had to offer while relying on good Southern values and gaining national recognition as a proven leader in education, public healthcare and human services.

She shares her life’s story to empower individuals to overcome any challenges that possibly could change the course of direction from a negative to a positive outcome.  “How Ya Like Me Now”, is a best seller and great autobiography that is sure to bring back memories of early childhood days for many.  It takes your mind on a journey through the early migration to the north for some families and the many tragedies of the late 60’s while surviving urban living.

Recently, the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper, “The Anointed News Journal”, had the opportunity to read this autobiography and host an exclusive interview with Leslie A. Morris.  During the interview Morris shares excerpts from her autobiography and how she became the success story that has impacted young people around the nation.

Collins:
Who is Leslie A. Morris?

Leslie:
Leslie Morris is every woman.  Leslie Morris is a daughter and granddaughter of Southern sharecroppers. She is the daughter and granddaughter of women who never progressed through elementary school.  She is the daughter of a mom and grandmother who had a greater vision for the next generation of children.  She is the daughter of a mother and grandmother who migrated north to make that vision a reality. She is the daughter of a mother who raised her four children on the salary of a domestic worker. Black women who worked as domestic workers at that time worked for Jewish families and were paid no more than $10 a day.

Because of that we lived in housing projects. The women who lived in the housing projects at that time during the 60’s and 70’s, were like my mother and grandmother, who migrated north, who were uneducated but had a greater vision for their children.  I was among that first generation of children raised in the housing projects in a small town on the Jersey shore called Long Branch, NJ.  We were raised by women who not only worked hard but also took pride in the community.  Unlike a lot of people in the projects today, the women back then took pride by planting flowers, kept their apartments immaculate; I was never ashamed to bring anyone home, they were women who raised their children with a solid set of values, many of the values that are missing in the lives of children today.  We were raised by Southern people who came to the north with Southern values of sending their children to church, teaching them about Jesus Christ, trying to instill in them the value of good education; something they were deprived of in the south, and women that emphasized working hard, working for the things you want and giving us a sense of hope. Hope that, yes things are difficult but, you have opportunities that we didn’t and we want you to take advantage of them.

Leslie Morris is a product of that environment.  I think I, more so than my siblings and some of my friends, internalize that value of a good education and wanting to do something better with my life.

Collins:
You wrote an autobiography three years ago, “How Ya Like Me Now”? What motivated you to write this autobiography?

Leslie:
I was motivated by a number of things. One, I felt that I had something to say.  I had experiences growing up in Long Branch, NJ that could benefit other young people who may be experiencing similar problems and issues. I felt that I could use the benefit of my problems to help them.  That was number one.

The second reason I wrote a book was because I’d learned a long time ago that writing is very therapeutic. You are not just writing but you are also reflecting.  As an adult when you reflect, you realize things you don’t realize when you are younger because you don’t have those experiences.  So I knew that writing could help me put into perspective some of the things I may not have understood when I was younger.

 I wrote the book for my own therapeutic reasons and in writing and reflecting on some of my experiences, I came to understand a lot of things that I didn’t understand before.  I understood why my mother may have been so hard on me.  I also understood why she may have been a little verbally abusive because her life growing up in the south wasn’t no crystal stair either.  I came to understand why my father behaved the way he did and why a lot of Black men in my community behaved the way they did.  I understood while writing, the impact of racism on Black men.  I came to understand a lot that I didn’t back then.  I think that once you understand those things it helps you to be more forgiving of some of your experiences.

Collins:
You began speaking of living in the south and then migrating to the north.  You speak of your experience of living in the projects in Long Branch, NJ and having disorderly juvenile behavior.  You often speak of a void and the feeling of abandonment from your mother that may have caused your disorderly behavior as a child.  Can you please share those thoughts with us?

Leslie:
There were a lot of things going on during that time period but I think that in terms of the feelings of abandonment, my dad left the family when I was about seven.  That created feelings of abandonment as it would for any child.  When children feel abandoned, they either feel depressed and withdrawn or they act out.  I acted out. I started getting into trouble and getting into fights because there really wasn’t an avenue for me to talk about my feelings.  When kids can’t talk about their feelings they act out.  I started fighting, I was very angry. I didn’t understand what was going on.  My mom was very upset that my dad had left.  A lot of the anger that she was feeling, as the eldest girl, I had to bear the brunt of that. It was a very difficult time for me that lead to some acting out behaviors that got me suspended from school, I had an encounter with the juvenile justice system, got into fights and it was just a very traumatic period in my life.

Collins:
I noticed that many kids while acting out do not do well in school.  However, you were the opposite.  Though you were acting out, you excelled well in school.  What motivated you to focus on your schoolwork in spite of your issues?

Leslie:
You are right Chris.  Most kids acting out do not do well in school.  For me, I discovered my propensity for academia at a very early age.  At an early age I could read, I could write and I got a lot of support for that.  That was the one area in my life where I could shine.  That was my source of self-esteem, my ability to do well in school.  I never lost sight of that.  No matter what was going on and how bad things were for me, I always made certain that I did well in school.  There was another part of me that also knew that staying focused in school could lead to bigger and better things.  That notion came from my mom and a lot of different places.  I knew that doing well could also lead to college and I never lost sight of that.

Collins:
Many children growing up in the projects are not always expected to excel as well as those coming from other neighborhoods.  You were not expected to become the success story you have.  How did you feel not having a community support system as a child?

Leslie:
Well I wouldn’t say I didn’t have a support system because no matter how bad I was, I had my mom, grandmother, aunt and family.  They were always there for me even though they called me a bad girl.  The community support systems were there.  I think that my community supported me academically.  I was always known as a smart girl.  “She’s a little crazy, but smart,” they’d say.  I got a lot of support for that.  But, on the other side, because I was getting into a lot of trouble, there were many people who did kind of predict my societal demise; she’s never going to be anything, she’s going to end up pregnant, she’s going to jail, etc.  Not everyone was saying that.  There were those who were encouraging me and pointing out to me that I really am smart and I need to stop getting into trouble that could really be something.  It was two-sided.  Those who talked about me and didn’t expect anything from me, and those who were encouraging me certainly my mom and grandmother supported me.  Even though they were sick of me, they never gave up on me.  I think that was also the “key” in my life.

Collins:
Throughout your book, after each chapter, you share your thoughts about many of the young women you’ve mentored.  What message do you want the reader to get out of your book when reading it?

Leslie:
That no matter what you go through in life and no matter how bad things are, you can still rise above those obstacles. Where you start out in life doesn’t necessarily have to be your destiny.  That’s the real message.

 Growing up in the projects in a single family home where there were clearly problems; both internally in the family and in the community, doesn’t mean that you cannot rise above that and go on establishing goals for yourself and make something out of your life.  That’s the primary message.

Collins:
There was a time in your life that your behavior led you to becoming a juvenile delinquent.  You were involved in a fight that you wanted to avoid.  As a result life changed for you and several others.  Please share with us about that life changing experience.

Leslie:
During that time I was thirteen in 1966. It was right in the midst of the Civil Rights Movement and fighting was going on all across the country.  Black people were fighting for their rights and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was certainly very active during that time.  Even though we were up north, every night on the nightly news we could see what was going on throughout this country.  Black people were being sprayed down with hoses and dogs “sicked” on them.  We had our own brand of protest.  It wasn’t a good time for a White girl to call a Black girl or Black person a nigger.  Those were fighting words!

I was called a nigger by a White girl who was one of my classmates, same age.  I ended up in a fight with her after school.  It was only supposed to be just a one on one little light weight fight that kids got into back then. But it ended up being a full-fledged gang fight where many kids jumped in and began beating this girl to the point where she had a fractured skull, ended up in the hospital and almost died.  Four of us were arrested and four little 13 years old Black girls ended up in the juvenile justice system.

Unlike today, thank God we had parents who were strong and stood by us.  A lot of juveniles today that get caught up in the juvenile justice system just go on and graduate into the adult prison system.  We were caught up in the system, ended up in court and thankfully by the grace of God, my grades were pretty good and the judge gave me a chance and didn’t send me to jail. In fact, he didn’t send three of us to jail.  He put us all on probation and made us go through counseling.  But one of us did get sent to jail.  She got sent to Bordentown Correctional Facility and I never saw her again.  Twenty-five years later, I heard that she was in prison for life for murder.  I often wonder if that one little fight she got into along with the rest of us really started her on the path to destruction.  I carry that guilt even today because I always felt that she took the fall for a whole lot of kids, that she should have not been sent up, and that if anyone had been sent away, it should have been me because it was my fight.  I think about Vanessa almost every day and have tried to find her.  With today’s technology, I used the internet to try to find her and have not been successful.  Here it is forty years later and I have no idea if she is even still alive or dead?  But if I ever find her, I want to publicly apologize to her for having to take the fall for all of us, and to let her know that I never just went on with my life without thinking of her, and without carrying the burden of what happened to her.

Collins:
You’ve overcome these challenges.  How motivating was it for you when after all the challenges, you get called to the principal’s office and there is a representative from one of the most prestigious women’s colleges in the nation, there to offer you a full scholarship?

Leslie:
That was a life changing experience.  That was February 1971. I was a senior in high school. I knew I wanted to go to college but had no idea how?  I certainly didn’t have parents that could send me.  I was just waiting for an opportunity and was about to start filling out applications for other schools and state schools but I really wasn’t sure where to go or how to do all of this.  In the book, I call Brenda Franklin my angel, along with my guidance counselor Ms. Theodora Apostolocus.  I still keep in touch with her and have her cell phone number.  God bless her! She is still living in Long Branch and she is 85 years old and as inspiring today as she was back then.  She was my angel because when Ms. Franklin walked into my school high school and said, “I want your brightest and your blackest.”  My guidance counselor said, “I got just the person for you.  She’s a little rough but she’s smart and she could probably do well up in Boston.” 

I got called down to the guidance office that day and my guidance counselor said, “This is Leslie Morris.”  Ms. Franklin sat down with me and said, “We can give you a full ride to Simmons College in Boston.”  I didn’t know where Boston was but I knew it was cold up there.  I remember saying “Ain’t it cold up there?”  She told me to fill out this paper and I could get a full ride.  She had my grades and my transcript was good.  I remember everything was moving so fast. I filled the papers out and the next thing I knew I was on a bus up to Boston.

It was really a life changing experience.  My guidance counselor now has an academic “Hall of Fame.”  Last year, she nominated me for the Long Branch High School Academic Hall of Fame and I was accepted by the committee.  It was a natural high that day.  There were 20 of us inducted and the whole day was devoted to us beginning at 8:00 am until the dinner that evening.  Ms. Apostolocus got up to speak that night and I remember she said, “I didn’t have any problems recommending Leslie for Simmons because I knew she would do well academically.  My concern was that she would go up there and start beating up those middle class girls.”  The whole audience fell out laughing at that point because people knew me back then.  Ms. Apostolocus went on to say, “She did well in her life and I’m so very proud of her.”  It was indeed a life changing experience and I believe that God was all in it.  I believe it was all laid out and that’s where God wanted me to be and He put all of those resources in place to make that happen.

Collins:
How much of a cultural shock was it for you to leave Long Branch and attend an all women’s college?

Leslie:
It was an eye opening experience.  It was a great experience.  I went to Simmons, without a lot of the social graces that many of the middle class girls had; black or white.  I didn’t have the money or the resources and had not been exposed to a lot of the things the other girls had when they were growing up.  But you know what Chris, what I did have many of the other girls lacked.  I had a grandmother back home praying for me and had been all of my life.  I had two grandmothers back home who were members of the Pentecostal church and were praying women and knew the Lord.  They were praying for their child to do well.  I had a momma back home working for Jewish families who didn’t look kindly on the maid’s daughter going to Simmons College.  I had a momma back home who was pulling for me and I had a community back home pulling for me. 

I remember the support coming from home.  Long before the internet I would get letters from my family saying, “Dear Les, we hope things are going well for you? We are home praying for you.”  They would sign about fifty names to the letter saying here’s $5 from grandma, Uncle Joe, mommy, daddy, etc. everyone would give a quarter to fifty cents.  The five dollars would come from about 10 people and that was my little allowance.  Those things meant something.  I didn’t have a lot of social experience but I grew in my experiences at Simmons College.  I grew as a person, as a woman, as a black woman and I came to have those social graces.  I gained confidence in myself and going to an all women’s college was truly an empowering experience.  Many of the women I was around, even today, are on a national landscape like Gwen Ifill who did the presidential debates and was at Simmons College with me, Rahema Ellis who is a national correspondent for NBC in New York, Lynn White who was on FOX News in New York for several years, and another woman whose name escapes me because she was before me, is the treasurer of the Washington Post.  Black Women who are known nationally.  Ann Brown Fudge who is constantly in Ebony and Essence Magazines as the first Black woman vice-president at a major corporation with General Foods and Paula Sneed, who retired as one of the first Black women who served as vice-president for KRAFT Foods.  I was at Simmons with all of these women.  It was an empowering experience how this poor little Black girl out of the projects, could go up to that school and grow as a woman because of the other women that helped me to grow.

Collins:
How do you sum up the title of your book, “How Ya’ Like Me Now”?

Leslie:
That title came about, kind of in the middle of writing book. I thought back on an experience when I was 11 years old, a girlfriend of mines’ mother did not want her to play with me because I was bad.  She said to her daughter, “I don’t want you to play with that girl because she is a bad influence.”  I remember the tears rolling down my eyes that day as she said that.  What a horrible thing to say.  Even if I was bad, a child should never hear another parent say that about them.

Fast forward some 20 years I went off to Simmons College and graduated with honors.  I went on to Boston College and received my Masters Degree in Psychiatric Social Work. Then I went down to University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill where I received my second Masters Degree in Public Health in the area of Maternal and Child Health.  Now her daughter whom she did not want playing with me, ended up on drugs as a full blown crack addict and alcoholic.  “How Ya’ Like Me Now”?

Collins:
What advice do you offer to a struggling young person who may be traveling that road you’ve travelled as a young person?

Leslie:
I would say that it is very important for young people to identify very early on what their strengths are.  Even if you don’t have the support systems and encouragement from anyone it’s important for you to start capitalizing on those strengths.  Use those strengths to set goals for yourself and never lose sight of those goals.  Then work towards those goals.

That’s what I did.  No matter how bad things were, I knew I could do well in school. I discovered that strength early on and capitalized on them.  I was the type of kid that would get suspended from school and go around to all of my teachers to get my homework so I would not fall behind in class.  I knew doing well in school was the ticket to a higher education and a better quality of life. 

 What keeps kids off track is that they don’t have a vision for the future.  Everything looks hopeless and dim for them.  There’s no vision because no one is offering them good advice.

Collins:
How can people get a copy of your book or get in touch with you for speaking engagements?

Leslie:
You can get my book in several places.  Number one you can go on the website to order it.  The website is www.howyalikemenow.com or order the book off of Amazon.  You can also email me at lesliemorris@howyalikemenow.com and you can also contact me there for any speaking engagements and workshops.

Collins:
In conclusion, what do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Leslie:
I am so happy that I discovered this newspaper.  I met Chris a year ago and we didn’t stay connected. I think when things like that happen it’s a reason. There is a season and a reason for everything.  Chris and I became reconnected again during the same event, “National Health Center Week” when I ran into him at an event for one of our health centers. We now remain connected.

I think the Anointed News Journal is a wonderful newspaper.  I love this newspaper because, first of all, it’s a very easy read. Secondly I love reading about all of the authors he writes about. I love reading also about some of the Christian events that are taking place that I probably would not have known about if I didn’t read it in the Anointed News Journal.  Chris has also opened up additional doors for me, not only in this interview but he has also introduced me to a Black book store in Camden that I didn’t even know existed.  He introduced me to Larry Miles of La Unique African American Books.  I will also be doing a book signing there through Chris.  In turn, I have been able to get Chris some business and I will continue to work on his behalf to make sure people know about the Anointed News Journal. I will continue to promote it so that he can continue to get the advertising he needs to keep doing the good work that he is doing.

Collins:
The nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper, “The Anointed News Journal” certainly salutes Leslie A. Morris as a mover-and-shaker.  Not just as a professional in Corporate America, but also as a motivator to many through her books.  “How Ya Like Me Now”, is an autobiography that could very easily become a movie on the silver screen. I encourage everyone to get a copy of it and share your feedback with us.  I’ve read many books throughout the 2010 season and this one made me pick it up every time I had a spare moment.

The Anointed News journal will be featuring Leslie A. Morris at a book signing in Camden coming very soon.  Look to the upcoming issue for additional information including time and location.  Or contact us at 856-904-9429 for information.

By Chris Collins

If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

Visionary’s Dream Leads To Lucrative Offers In The Millions

A'Drienne M. Dixon, A'Drienne M. Dixon, Founder/CEO of T.U.P.A.C. (Train Up A Child) moves forward with the vision of bringing faith-based action figures to children around the world.

BALTIMORE, MD A'Drienne M. Dixon is a visionary that has taken the world by storm with her patent for faith based action figures of today’s spiritual leaders.  Several years ago, the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” had the pleasure of doing an exclusive interview introducing this business extraordinaire to the market.

Initially, Ms. Dixon created the Bishop David G. Evans prototype, including an action figure in his robe and one dressed down in fatigues.  Today, Ms. Dixon has a prototype of Pastor Jamal Bryant and Dr. Rita Twiggs. Calls have been coming in from around the United States of America and international countries too.  Recently, the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper, “The Anointed News Journal”, had the opportunity to sit down with Ms. Dixon in Baltimore, Maryland for an exclusive on where she is now with T.U.P.A.C.

Collins:
Several years ago you released the first edition of the Bishop David G. Evans action figure.  Share with us about the journey from then to where you are now.

A'Drienne:
Chris, it has been about two years now and “Train Up A Child” has made some remarkable steps in a positive direction.  We have support from around the world.  We have individuals from around the world who want to become investors. We have an outgoing support of people in the faith-based industry as well as some outside of the faith-based community.  His support has certainly been worth its weight in gold.

Collins:
What is some of the feedback that you are receiving from Christian leaders today?

A'Drienne:
That’s an interesting question and I’m glad you asked.  I would say that about 80% of the feedback has been positive yet as with any venture whether it be spiritual or whatever the case may be, you will always have your naysayers.  Here’s my thing. Everything isn’t for everyone.  “Train Up A Child” is in position to introduce a vehicle that will help children maintain a very healthy and spiritual life.  If we are concerned about their physical and mental, then why not be concerned about their spiritual?  That is what the T.U.P.A.C. Initiative is all about.

Collins:
At the end of the day, what is the ultimate goal for Train Up A Child?

A'Drienne:
The ultimate outcome for Train Up A Child, I want to be very clear on this matter, and again Chris you are asking some great questions, it is not to line my pockets or anyone else, but to help children around the world.  Many times children grow up with no spiritual foundation and for me personally, if I didn’t have that foundation that my parents instilled in me at an early age, I would feel way ward , like I’m going out of the world backwards, like my grandmother used to say. For a child to feel that they can do all things through Christ and that they are more than a conqueror, or no weapon formed against them shall prosper, I believe these are a mindset that will carry them throughout any type of adversity that life has to offer.

Collins:
A'Drienne, you’ve received international attention with your patent for faith-based action figures.  You’ve received international offers to purchase your patent in the millions of dollars and you’ve stood your ground.  Why did you stand your ground and what type of offer are you looking for?

A'Drienne:
That’s interesting Chris. The support as I mentioned earlier has come from 47 states here in the United States and from 4 continents across the world, so the support is there around the world. We have received lucrative offers to purchase “Train Up A Child” and to secure the rights to our provisional patent. However, we feel that right now is not the time that God would allow us to sell the business or even take on investors.  What we are looking for is support and the avenues of least resistance, if you will.  I feel that major toy companies who have departments and business locations around the world, who have the will with all to take this vision through to fruition, should be willing and able to facilitate this.  That’s what our journey entails.  Marketing and licensing our patent rights to a major toy company so that we can get our products in the hands of children, not just in New Jersey, not just in the United States, but all around the world.

Collins:
You have the support of at least three major hitters in the faith-based community; Bishop David G. Evans, Prophet Todd Hall and Dr. Rita Twiggs. All of whom stand with you in this endeavor.  Mattel, Hasbro and Parker Brothers, what goes through your mind when you think of these major toy companies and your current support system?

A'Drienne:
Wow, that’s outstanding Chris. Here’s is what I think.  I think about a sermon that my pastor delivered a few months ago on how God will put certain people in your life to help facilitate certain things.  The doors that I have been trying to open for about a year or so, He has allowed me to meet people who are helping me to facilitate opening those doors.  I believe that God will do it, through faith and it’s just a matter of time. What we need to do is to shift the focus of fantasy and imagination to that of spirituality.  We concentrate on things that help children with their imagination in that matter but we need to shift that focus to concentrating on those things that grow their spirit and nourishes their spirit, helping them with a closer walk with whoever their faith provider is.

When asked by a top executive representing a major toy manufacture for our firm to prove to them that there is a “Faith-based” toy market, I shot back in a condescending tone, “You prove there’s not!” You have all the time, money and resources that would take our firm a lifetime to research. With that mind set at the forefront, we decided that it was time to broaden our scope of marketing. We are participating in international marketing campaigns to reach THE FOUR CORNERS OF THE WORLD. Our campaigns include, but are not limited to, direct mailings, telemarketing, and internet blogging. We have even joined the rest of the world by connecting with others on Skype, Twitter and Facebook. I'm excited to report that our company has supporters in 47 states and on 4 Continents.

A'Drienne:
Chris, there is two words that come to mind. I remember being very young in my walk with Christ and if I didn’t remember anything else to say, I would always say, “Thank you.”  When things used to happen that I knew were out of control and had to be divine intervention, I would have to say, “Thank you.”  So I would like to extend that thank you, to the “Anointed News Journal,” to the people of my church and to those people who rallied around me and gave their support.  I say that this is a vision that God gave me.  I am just a vessel. Yet, I will use my ability to bring the vision through to fruition with supporters like yourself and the “Anointed News Journal,” and I do thank you.

Collins:
T.U.P.A.C. is a faith based, vision lead firm that seeks to transform the toy industry. Our mission involves the movement from toys that symbolize fantasy and imagination, to those that give the insight to spiritual values. Parents, guardians, and others that hold a fiduciary position in a child’s life, have the responsibility of helping them sustain a healthy "spiritual" life. An argument can be made to include one’s "spiritual" growth within Maslow’s model of Hierarchical needs, I often protest in conversation. If early intervention is not provided, we will be robbing our children of a fundamental tool in developing spiritual strength and awareness, which is critical when facing adversity and achieving success.

A’Drienne Dixon is a woman who walks by faith, and not by sight. She always knew God had a special calling on her life, even at a young age - She just never knew to what degree. “I can remember being a little girl, my prayer would be; ‘Lord use me!’  I do not know what your plans are for my life, or how you are going to do it, but whatever it is, I will be prepared. I want to do BIG things, change the world!” She often thought it was her role as an Adult Education instructor, which she did for an institution of higher education for approximately 11 years. Helping individuals that did not have the opportunity to prepare for the New Jersey GED State Exam would be the mission. But, that was not it.

I was fortunate to be present during a meeting with Dr. Rita Twiggs, who is an international spiritual icon and A’Drienne Dixon.  I was excited for Ms. Dixon as she navigated her vision to Dr. Twiggs.  Immediately, Dr. Twiggs offered her support not just verbally but her contacts and resources too.  I was fortunate to be attending the Power of God Conference at Bethany Baptist Church, Lindenwold, NJ when Prophet Todd Hall, who is also internationally known, prophesied calling out Ms. Dixon’s first and last name.  He also mentioned the action figures in his prophesy and that she would become very wealthy. I witnessed a song writer sang the T.U.P.A.C. National Anthem, that was written specifically for Ms. Dixon’s company. I’m also aware and abreast of many of the international offers that have come across the table offering Ms. Dixon in upwards of millions of dollars for her provisional patent for the “Scriptural Speaking Inspirational Figurine.” Yet in all of these scenarios, Ms. Dixon has not mentioned anything about getting rich and lining her pockets or the pockets of others.  She only continues to talk about the importance of helping children around the world.

A’Drienne M. Dixon is looking for you the readers of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal”, to petition the toy companies letting them know that you support this faith-based initiative.  She wishes for everyone to join her support group on facebook.  To explore T.U.P.A.C. and each component that makes this possible, visit the following web addresses; TUPAC WEBSITE – www.tupacinternational.com, TUPAC BLOG – http://oldtestamentnewtestamenttodaysheroes.blogspot.com, PATENT INFORMATION – http://www.faqs.org/patents/app/20090209165, FREE MP3 DOWNLOAD – www.youtube.com (search -  Train Up A Child), FREE ONLINE SURVEY – http://freeonlinesurveys.com/rendersurvey.asp?sid=8kzclb94u5ccv5k318487, FOLLOW US ON TWITTER – http://twitter.com/trainupachild1, FACEBOOK CAUSES – http://www.causes.com/profiles/53584584.

Disclaimer:

Support for T.UP.A.C. has been pouring into my office and collected through various networking avenues from around the world. Supporters have reached out to say that although very non-traditional, faith-based toys are an excellent idea - as long as their kept in perspective. As with other items that are introduced and marketed for children, we encourage parents to use them responsibly. The nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper, “The Anointed News Journal”, would like to salute A'Drienne M. Dixon, as our mover-and-shaker for the month.  Ms. Dixon has served a Notice of Opportunity to interested parties. She is also offering 10% of her business to you or someone you know that can help to move this company forward. We encourage you all to contact TUPAC International for more information.

By Chris Collins

 If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

Reverend Tony C. Evans Celebrates 10 years of Leading Tenth Street Baptist Church into the New Era.

Camden, NJ – Reverend Tony C. Evans for several years have been a voice in the City of Camden, helping to make a difference in one of the more challenging cities in America.  A man that could possibly be anywhere in the country has taken pride in being able to introduce the members of the historic Tenth Street Baptist Church and many residents of Camden, to an all new style of ministry.

Rev. Evans, who is certainly a relationship builder amongst all walks of life, took the time to share his outlook with the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal.” In an exclusive interview, Rev. Evans gave an overview of his journey with corporate America, entertainment, government, college and ministry in what some might consider the toughest city in America. He also gives insight of what it was like to grow up in one of the toughest neighborhoods in America, the south side of Chicago, Illinois.

Collins:
Reverend Evans as pastor of the Tenth Street Baptist Church, you will soon be celebrating your 10th Anniversary.  Share with us a little about the rich history of Tenth Street Baptist Church.

Evans:
Anyone who knows Tenth Street Baptist Church knows that it’s been around for a long time.  It was established in 1888.  We say established rather than founded because everyone knows that Jesus Christ founded the church and everything after that was established.  Tenth Street Baptist Church was established by a team of prayer warriors.  It started off as a prayer group that was praying around the Centerville neighborhood of Camden.  Eventually a charter was established.

We had worship places in places such as Ferry Avenue Methodist Church until our original location was acquired. In fact our original name was Mt. Zion Baptist Church.  The name was changed once we established the property on 10th Street and our named became, Tenth Street Baptist Church.  We are the second oldest Baptist church in the City of Camden behind the historic Kaighn Avenue Baptist Church.  I am the eleventh pastor in our rich history and the second longest tenure after the late Reverend J. Allen Nimo, who served 51 years prior to my taking over as pastor.

 

Collins:
Throughout the many years that Tenth Street Baptist Church has been serving Camden, many community leaders, politicians, recording artists and legendary names have come out of there.  You are also considered to be one of the churches with the eldest congregations.  Share your thoughts on this.

Evans:
Definitely! I call it the most seasoned church in the City of Camden.  When I first took over as pastor, we had over 90 members over the age of 70.  Even today we are one of the eldest congregations.  Many know that the first woman mayor in the City of Camden, Gwendolyn Faison, is a long-term member of Tenth Street and still very active.  Sister Hazel Nimo, who is also the wife of the late pastor J. Allen Nimo, was a long-term librarian at Camden High School. Sister Fannie Williams is 96 years old and very active and the list goes on and on.  Just to mention some of the others, the legendary Leon Huff, Sound of Philly started  here, Cindy Birdsong, who sang with Patti LaBelle and the “Blue Belles” before she moved on to join the Supremes with Diana Ross. Dr. Brim was a part of our church as well as some of the founding members of the Tri-State Mass Choir.

Collins:
Eleven years ago you were a candidate for pastor here at Tenth Street.  You were well established in Corporate America with companies like Proctor & Gamble and Ocean Spray.  You are a part of the Rainbow Coalition with Reverend Jesse Jackson, Sr. and you are a chaplain with the fraternity Kappa Alpha Psi.  You have been and possibly can be anywhere in the United States of America, what was your motivation to come to a small town called, Camden, New Jersey?

Evans:
Having been in the ministry for over 20 years, you really start looking at the spirituality and purpose of what you are doing.  One thing the word of God does is it encourages us who are preachers to preach to the sick. In coming to the East Coast as a manager for Ocean Spray, I got to know the City called Camden.  I was told it was a lot of problems with poverty, violence, drugs and that it was devastating. I was living in a town not far from Camden and took advantage of the opportunity to minister to those who were living amongst these conditions.  This was during a time when Ocean Spray wanted me to leave and go to Massachusetts and because I value family and vowed not to pull my son out of high school, I decided to stay in the area.  I was a good friend with the City Business Administrator of Camden during that time, who was also City Manager of Willingboro.  When he found out that I was available, he asked if I would be interested in coming to Camden. I was interested in looking at the opportunity and although in the beginning there was some controversy on the amount of money I was paid, I saw a level of service that I could provide. I had a wealth of experience in government, corporate America and working with various nonprofit organizations. Camden seemed to be the right place for me and I took advantage of the opportunity.

When I came into the City of Camden, the first position I held was Supervising Analyst for the Department of Health and Human Services. This eventually led to the position of Director of the Department of Health and Human Services. This also afforded me the opportunity to become the Executive Assistant to the Mayor which basically gave me the role as her Chief of Staff.  I took on additional roles as Information Officer for the City which allowed me to assist Mayor Faison in having a very successful career by hosting several activities during her two-terms as mayor. I was very thankful for the opportunity and because I had previous experience working in government in the State of Iowa, I felt I could come in and make an immediate impact for the administration.

Collins:
There are several churches in the Centerville neighborhood; Tenth Street, Antioch, Ferry Avenue Methodist, Bethel AME and a host of smaller congregations.  You are positioned in what was considered to be at one time the most difficult and possibly dangerous communities in Camden. Over the past 10 years this neighborhood has completely transformed into possibly the most beautiful community in Camden. What is it like to minister in this neighborhood and what was it like to minister in what was considered to be at one time, the most dangerous city in America.

Evans:
First of all you have to have the compassion to realize the current state.  Having been raised in the Southside of Chicago, in the Inglewood district which is still today, the most troubled and dangerous district in America, offered me the experience in understanding the plight of the residents here in Camden.  I had compassion to want to help because growing up I had mentors that helped me.  As a result I was able to continue my education and attend a Historical Black College, Tennessee State University.  The impact of those mentors continued to follow me throughout my career.  My ministry has always been about encouraging others.

Service is one of the greatest things you could ever do.  As Director of the Department of Health and Human Services, I was able to see the entire City of Camden and get some things done.  Being a minister just across the street from one of Camden’s housing developments, Branch Village, and an owner of another housing development, J. Allen Nimo Court, it gave me the opportunity to be real involved and hands on with the community. I was able to attend community meetings and really understand the needs of the residents. I was able to provide some of the resources through the ministry. Service has always been a part of my life. As a child I was a Cub Scout, boy scouts, boys club and YMCA.

Collins:
Several pastors in the Centerville neighborhood were able to come together and help to transition this section of Camden.  Project housing has been converted to beautiful town homes and senior living for the elderly has become primary.  Share with us your experiences of working together with your colleagues in ministry.

Evans:
I give high praises to Pastor John O. Parker, who has become a great friend of mine.  Before I was employed by the city and before I became pastor of Tenth Street, I spent time with him and we would pray about the situation in Camden.  Part of that led to my position as pastor of Tenth Street as well as my position in City Hall. All things work together for the good of them that love the Lord.  We found some synergy as we did several things in the city such as; Fugitive Safe Surrender, where several thousand fugitives surrendered themselves to law enforcement at the Antioch Baptist Church, prayer marches throughout the city and the opportunity for so many churches to work together. The churches in Centerville have come together to show a sign of unity and we have been successful in helping to transform our neighborhood.

Collins:
You’ve been a part of major transitioning in Camden.  Where do you go from here?

Evans:
I think we have to continue to motivate individuals to make a change in their lives. Trouble has always existed since the beginning.  We might not get rid of trouble but we can alter the behavior of individuals through preaching the word of God and demonstrating such leadership.

We should highlight mentors and the good news of Camden, just the same as you do with the Anointed News Journal. Sharing the greatness of the City of Camden, which Camden has a wealth of, is what we all should take part in.  If you really want to show the greatness of a city, let us look at the number of success stories per capita compared to some of the negative stories
of the largest cities. We have many Camdenites that have impacted the nation such as; Highs man Trophy Winners, global corporate leaders, legendary songwriters and entertainers, politicians, judges, lawyers, business leaders, professional athletes, etc. Camden has it and has done it over the years.  If we take that and compare it to the number of murders and crime statistics, you would find that Camden is still leading in the positive categories as well. Yes we are leading in some of the bad things but sometimes you need to know what you are doing wrong in order to turn it around. Leadership that has come out of Camden has benefited people and companies all across the nation.

Collins:
Under your watch, Tenth Street has gone through some changes and renovations.  Share with us about the new Tenth Street Baptist Church.

Evans:
I’m very proud to say that as the Lord gave me the vision, we expanded our church.  While many churches expand in capacity, our vision was to expand in comfort.  Because we are one of the most seasoned churches in the city, we wanted to make our facility comfortable for our members and visitors.  We were able to do an addition within my first five years that brought in one of the largest elevators in South Jersey. For example, our elevator is the same size as the one you will see at Cooper Hospital.  We also put in a ground level entry so that the seniors and others could come in and not have to walk up the stairs if they didn’t want to.  We improved the bathrooms and first aid room. We love our historic sanctuary and we added to it by cushioning the pews to make them more comfortable. With the help of Leon Huff, we’ve improved the sound system. With the help of Mayor Faison and her contributions, we were able to improve the fellowship hall.  We also have members that have contributed too.  The church has been very excited to help upgrade our comforts.  At one time we were one of the largest churches in the city and now we are one of the most comfortable churches in Camden.

On the outside we continued to look at how we can assist our community.  One major issue outside our doors was traffic.  Centerville has always had issues with drugs and traffic along 10th Street.  Having an Engineering Degree in Architecture and Urban Planning, I look at changing the route of 10th Street and making it a one way street.  In the past, drug users would come in, get their drugs and rush out down 10th Street to I-676 to go back out of town. My thoughts were to eliminate some of the drug traffic by changing the street routes.  If you are going to come into Camden, then come into Camden. We petitioned and got clearance to have a one way street coming into Camden and eliminated the easy access to turn around and go back out the same route.  We also change the street behind us. Now to get out, you have to make a left or right and go towards Mt. Ephraim or Broadway to get out.  By that time those who are coming in to buy and distribute drugs, were often introduced to our fine police department while trying to exit.  Drug dealers know that they want easy access in and out.  As a result of my experience with urban planning and growing up in the Southside of Chicago, we took away the easy access for the drug dealers in this part of town.

Much of what we are doing is changing the mindsets and working with the community.  As you know, I am Chairman of the Dooley House in Camden, a member of the Elk’s Lodge and a member of Kappa Alpha Psi which we are looking to be a support base for these organizations.  We as Christians acknowledge that we are sinners saved by grace. With this in mind, we do understand that it takes a collective effort in working with fraternities, sororities, Masonic orders and other nonprofits providing a level of service to the community to assure a successful transition.

Collins:
Throughout the years you was a drum major at TSU, you worked with the Rainbow Coalition with Jesse Jackson, Sr. and you were a recent recipient of many honors.  You were selected to receive the 2012 Circle of Winner Award, by the Anointed News Journal, which is a high honor. How does it feel to be honored by your peers?

Evans:
It was definitely an honor to be honored by my peers.  Anytime you receive an honor such as this, it reminds you that you are going in the right direction. It lets you know that what you are doing is appreciated and needed.  Those are the types of pats on the backs I want.  It lets me know that my service has made an impact. During my tenure as pastor of Tenth Street, other honors I received were the Whitney Young Award, which is the highest award given by the Boy Scouts of America.  I received Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Freedom Medal of Honor. Again those types of awards remind you of the impact you are making in society.  There were many others that I do appreciate as well.  I am committed to servicing and applying Gods word.

Collins:
In conclusion, what can one expect when attending a service at Tenth Street Baptist Church and what is your location and contact information?

Evans:
First of all, one can expect a loving church.  There are no big I’s and little U’s but we are all there to praise the Lord.  This is in fact the house of the Lord.  If you are comfortable wearing your casual clothes, wear them. We may have some traditions and customs but we don’t worship our traditions and customs. We worship the lord in spirit and in truth.  We want people to come in and except Jesus.  Our services start at 11:00am every Sunday with Sunday-School beginning at 9:00am.  We have a midweek service every Wednesday at 6:00pm. It’s three-fold, Bible Study, prayer meeting and sermonette.  We know it’s sometimes difficult for people to come out on Sundays with the world having 7 day work weeks and people working Sundays.  Therefore we are trying to make it convenient for those who need to worship on a different day.  We are located at 1860 South 10th Street, Camden, NJ 08104.  We are just off the intersection of Ferry Avenue and 10th Street just South of Carl Miller Blvd. We are across the street from Branch Village Housing Development and Riletta Twyne Cream Elementary School is to our back.  We want everyone to come out and have a good time.  We do offer transportation if you call us.  We are located approximately one mile West from Ferry Avenue PATCO Speed line and easy access to NJ Transit.  I invite you all to come for my 10th Anniversary Celebration on the 3rd Sunday in March. We have a great preacher coming from Des Moines, Iowa by the name of Harold Davis, Sr., We have a Gospel singer coming from Detroit, Michigan by the name of brother Eddie Doray. He used to be a background singer for Dionne Warwick and has two recording projects to his credit. My banquet that will be at the church here in Centerville is being hosted by the award winning chef Khalil Wyche.

We are excited to bring all of this to the Centerville section of Camden.  It was said that Centerville was going to be the last neighborhood to gain attention during this revitalization period but I’m glad to say that Centerville is the first.  To God be the glory.

Collins:
What do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Evans:
To the readers of the Anointed News, I say, “get the word out.” You are getting an enhancement to the knowledge that you read through Anointed News Journal. The word of God says, “Lean not to your own understanding.” So you have to search out for more information in other sources.  The Anointed News Journal is that source that is very effective. Be an ambassador for the Anointed News Journal. Just like when you get on the phone and gossip about things, gossip about the Anointed News Journal. In addition, not only read the good news but find a way to contribute to it.  We contribute to a lot of things.  We contribute to the casinos which build beautiful hotels.  If we contribute likewise to good causes in our communities, just think of what we can build.  Why can’t the Anointed News Journal be one of the leading media sources in this nation?  All it takes it is for us to spread the news.  Let us continue to read it, write in it and contribute to it financially.  We keep it in the front lobby of our church. Before you even see the church bulletin, you will see the Anointed News Journal. Think of the name, “Anointed”. This publication gives you the opportunity to fulfill your gifts and talents while sharing the word of God.  It reaches thousands of readers as the vision continues. I encourage you all to help us share the vision of Anointed News Journal and become a disciple for the Anointed News Journal.

Collins:
Reverend Tony C. Evans has supported many causes and has led the charge on a number of them.  Through his efforts, residents of Camden were fortunate to be the host of the Universal Soul Circus, in which Reverend Evans helped to bring the circus to the Camden Waterfront.  He was also responsible for many entertainers coming to speak with the children of Camden and for initiating several programs during his time serving in government.

Reverend Evans is recognized by many as a connector.  Although long winded most of the times, you can count on him to direct you to the right service provider and offer inside connections to services and people everywhere.

The nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal”, salutes Reverend Tony C. Evans, as our mover and shaker for the month.

By Chris Collins

 If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

“Color Blind” A Mixed Girl's Perspective on Biracial Life

Life Coach, Tiffany Rae Reid Debuts Book to Help People Understand Biracial Life

Camden, NJ – In today’s society we find that more people are exploring the option of interracial relationships.  As a result families are faced with the challenge of adjusting to cultural differences as well as the many customs and traditions that come along with it.  With a biracial President of the United States, Barack Obama, the world seems to embrace the thought of interracial relationships more than before.

Although individuals make a conscious decision to pursue the heart desires, the off-spring child is left with no choice at all.  This individual must experience what most of their parents did not. They have to experience growing up in a world different than mom and dad, but a world of being labeled biracial, mixed and even half-breed. Do we really take the time to consider what a biracial person goes through as they mature from a child into adulthood? Do parents consider the feelings of a child when it spends more time with one culture over the other? Does that biracial individual feel like they are in a world by themselves?  These are questions that I cannot answer.  However, the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal,” was fortunate enough to meet Author Tiffany Rae Reid, who shares her personal experiences of growing up biracial.

Collins:
Color Blind, A Mixed Girls Perspective on Biracial Life.  Who is Tiffany Rae Reid?

Reid:
That’s a good question Chris.  I have to say that I am a bi-racial woman who has a lot to say about what it is to be biracial. I finally have a voice and an opinion to share with the world.

Collins:
I am aware that in many of the Northern States, seeing a bi-racial couple is not uncommon.  However in many areas it is not common. What was your motivation to write Color Blind?

Reid:
My motivation came from interacting with parents and caregivers who were raising biracial children. I had opportunities in the community to really talk about my story of how I was raised in an all white Hungarian household.  I was raised by a mother who suffered from a phenomenon I coined, “colorblind.”  In that regard, my mother raised me without any regard for the color of my skin.  The more women and parents I met who were raising biracial children were so eager to come up to me after I’d give presentations. They would really express their gratitude for me sharing my story with them.  In the same vein, with the same breath, they would explain to me the ways they were raising their children without regards to their children’s skin color, totally missing the point of my presentation.

“Colorblind,” came about from a desire to write a few pages for the women and parents who were attending my workshops and seminars. Three to five pages turned into fifty and fifty into a hundred and “Colorblind” was born.

Collins:
You are a life coach for biracial issues.  Explain to us what you mean by this.

Reid:
I am a life coach and as a life coach I help people in transition, whether it is men, women, children, young adults or anyone who finds themselves at a place where they cannot move forward.  When I became a life coach, I joined the ranks of about ten thousand other people on the East Coast who coined the term, life coach.  This really caused me to turn inward to find out what was unique about me that I could share with people.  I did not want to go there because most of my life was spent hiding from all of my differences because that’s what my mother did best and that’s what she taught me.  Finally after a very interceptive spiritual and emotional journey I realized that I had something to say about what it was like to be biracial.  As soon as I tapped in to all of the things that made me unique as an individual, from the color of my skin to the texture of my hair, I began to become aware of the hundreds if not thousands of people around me in my community, the schools, or just my neighbors that shared something similar to what I had. Whether it was the parents that I saw or the children they were raising, I realized that the biracial community surrounding me was absolutely under served.

The same skills that I use to help people in general became the skill-set that transferred to the biracial community.  Once the door was opened, the floodgate went on.

Collins:
Some are ignorant to biracial relationships. It is often said that biracial couples make beautiful children. From the eyes of a biracial child growing up, is there a void?

Reid:
To that I think it is so important that we start here with the realization that unless a biracial child parents are biracial themselves, the parents will never understand the unique life experiences, challenges and obstacles that their biracial child will ever experience. Mono-racial parents who don’t consider themselves biracial or bicultural have absolutely no idea what their biracial children experience, period.

Having lived that exact life experience, I can tell you as a biracial child, as a biracial teenager, as a biracial adolescent and now adult, there is absolutely a void.  There is a disconnection between a biracial child and the mono-racial parents raising them.

Collins:
Do you feel that the parents will tend to lean more to one culture over the other?

Reid:
That is something that can happen. A lot of people just believe, going back to the previous statement, “biracial couples make beautiful babies,” I think that once they give into that and while their hearts are set on love and really wanting to have this union but not paying attention to the effects of what a biracial couple produce, they do not take into consideration all of the factors that will be against them.  Purely from a racial standpoint and purely because of the history of race relations in this country specifically, there comes a time when parents need to be absolutely aware of what they are doing in bringing a biracial child into this world. Without having the preparation and talking about it before bringing the biracial child into this world, it can be an absolute issue after the marriage bliss kind of fades away, when you are left with a bicultural or biracial family and parents who are not talking to each other decide to react whether in a verbal or nonverbal way of reinforcing attitude toward accepting one culture over another, though they might not think twice about it, their biracial child will surely be caught in this tug of war.  Whether it be stated or not stated at all by a parent, every day they will be asked to choose which culture and which race they will accept.

It is my mission that parents that are raising biracial children become cognizant of what they are doing and saying verbally, physically and emotionally to their biracial children. What racial stereotypes and challenges are you reinforcing to your child? Because if you are admonishing your child for dancing one way that culturally one race identifies with, and another race says it’s negative, then in fact you are asking that child to change what he or she feels comfortable with.

Collins:

It appears that young people today are embracing interracial relationships.  Many parents are not ready for their child to bring home a companion of another race or culture.  We now have a biracial President of the United States of America.  Is America ready for the flood of biracial couples today?

 

Reid:
When President Obama was elected to the White House, it was very easy for a lot of people to claim him as their own. We deal with this issue in America of how we claim Whiteness or Blackness. It is so easy for people to fall into the trap of claiming somebody who is quote unquote, the exceptional Black person.  All of a sudden color is cool when that person has exceeded the expectations of our racial history and stereotypes that have been set before us. I think with most things in our culture and our society that children have more imagination and ability to accept things that feel good in their heart. This will absolutely transcend the racial stereotypes and prejudices that existed with their parents and their parent’s generation.  While the conversation got started with the electing of President Barack Obama to the White House, it hasn’t continued. For me, with the writing of “Colorblind” and the workshops I give and the coaching sessions I provide for families and parents raising biracial children, it’s my attempt to continue that dialogue in a safe nonjudgmental environment.

Collins:
What can one expect when they read, “Colorblind?”

Reid:
It was difficult for me to write this book because of the culmination of this journey that I had to take that I didn’t necessary want to revisit.  Having revisited the many events in my life as a child, adolescent and teenager, where being different was not cool, it brought me to a place of understanding.  I can’t blame my mother for not having the resources and network that would have provided me with a lot more comfort that I have grew up with. For me, after reading “Colorblind” hundreds of time, what I’ve gotten out of it and what I hope others get out of it is One, to know they are not alone. Whether they are parents or family members or caregivers raising biracial children or what I find to be even more important is educators impacting the lives of biracial children in the classrooms, “Colorblind” delivers context and real life experiences that reminds them that as parents and educators, they are not alone. There are people out there struggling with the same thing. There are mono-racial White parents who can’t even say the word Black but they are raising a mixed Black and White child. There are biracial children whose parents don’t know how to do their hair and they are afraid to ask someone how to do it because they are embarrassed for people to know they had a union with a Black person and the stereotypes that come with it. “Colorblind” provides insight into what is was like for me as a biracial child being raised in an all white household.  Whether you are the parent or the child, there is a story here that is going to resonate. It’s actually a resource and guide for parents raising biracial children as well as for biracial children. What to do and what not to do; to how to respond to your biracial child when they come home from school and heard the “N” word for the first time. It feels wrong but they don’t know why in the context that it was used racially.  I hope that anyone seeking a better understanding of what it is like to live on the fringes of a White and Black world, they will come away after reading this, knowing more about biracial identity development.

Collins:
How are you embraced by your peers?

Reid:
Surprisingly, I am being embraced with gratitude.  Many of the families that I’ve been working with quietly and secretly have taken steps of courage. We just did a spread for a newspaper and the woman and her two children that were part of the interview had no problem sharing. As a result, we’ve both gotten phone calls thanking us for talking about it and that there is a resource now. Some of the groups that I am on online are saying we finally have a resource for African Americans who are raising biracial children. This book is for those people who are not in educational circles and do not have that support they can turn to at any time when they have questions.  When many people used to deal with this in secrecy, now do not have to deal with it alone.

Collins:
What is a biracial relationship? Is it Black and White? Is it one culture to another culture? Is it one religion to another religion?

Reid:
I’m very glad that you asked that question.  My business, Life Coaching by Tiffany Rae, our motto is, “building biracial relationships and mentoring.”  A lot of people are a little put off by that because they think building biracial relationships that within it could be looked at as racist or prejudice. When you look at biracialism, it’s biracial, two races.  I refer to everything being Black and White because that was my life experience being raised by a Hungarian mother and having an Africa American absentee father. However, biracial transcends bicultural which transcends bi-spiritual or bi-religious. Biracial is creating a dialogue about two races or more and two cultures or more.  My book, my company, my mission, my platform is dedicated to uniting people who are different. Whether it is a household that has been brought together through a mixed union such as Japanese and Chilean, Mexican and Chinese, Jewish and Buddhist or a Catholic and Christian, it’s all the same. One of my biggest clients is trans-racial and gay adoptees. Parents who have transcended race all together and said it doesn’t matter that I am White, I’m going to open up my heart and home to a child through adoption. They decided to stay here in the United States and raise children who are different races, colors and religions.

Collins:
You just recently released your book and have been featured throughout the media.  Where do you go from here?

Reid:
Where don’t I go from here, Chris? The response here on the East Coast has been phenomenal. I’m originally from Ohio and there was a featured story done in our local newspaper back home. From Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, in print and the television show I did in New York City as an expert on biracial relationships and interracial dating, “Colorblind” because of the topic that it covers, I feel resonates with a lot of people who I feel are just now getting comfortable talking about it. Interracial dating, raising biracial children, blending bicultural families, it is a topic that I believe is here to stay and now people have a reason to talk about it.

For me personally, I’m open for additional talk shows, television, cable or whatever platforms out there. Working with community organizations, local and national forums that provide a safe environment where people can get to me in order to talk about these issues to make sure that children are being raised with no fear and no judgment but a free way to communicate with their parents without the obstacles.

Collins:
How can people contact you to purchase “Colorblind” and to recruit your services for workshops?

Reid:
My book “Colorblind, A Mixed Girls Perspective on Biracial Life is available online through www.amazon.com and www.barnesandnoble.com. For an autographed copy, it’s available through my website at
www.tiffanyraecoaching.com. Pick up the phone. I’m always available via the telephone. My number is 201-450-3210 and I’m available through my email, tiffany@tiffanyraecoaching.com. I always provide complimentary coaching sessions to families, parents, educators and caregivers who are interested in finding out how my mentoring services can be available to them. I have a parents networking group that meets regularly and out of that comes that fact that parents have other couples that they can go to.  In February we are launching community support groups that people can come to and experience and give their children a time to come together and celebrate everything that makes them different and unique.

Collins:
What do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Reid:
To the readers of the Anointed News Journal, you are absolutely blessed to have Chris Collins do what he does to bring people together from all walks of life and really showcasing people in various communities giving them the opportunity by responding to their calling.  For the first time in my life I have stepped into my divine purpose and I will be able to connect with other people who are looking to do that because of you.  I thank you Chris and I thank all of the readers for their continued readership.

Collins:
Meeting Tiffany Rae Reid was certainly a breath of fresh air.  As we deal with the challenges of cultural diversity and tough economic times, more individuals are interacting and developing close relationships with those of another race, religion and culture.  Tiffany gives a true account in her book and a good understanding of how to deal with interracial relationships and understanding the challenges of biracial children.

Tiffany has motivated women and men and continues to impact the lives of families she comes in contact with each day.  I have always been aware of interracial relationships and the comfort level that two adults may share in their union, but I never considered the challenges that a biracial child might experience while growing up in this mean old ugly world. I am thankful for Tiffany Rae and her mission to open up our understanding. I encourage you the readers of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” to contact her and allow her to do workshops for your organizations or families.  Some interracial relationships might be more acceptable than others; White and Black, Hispanic and Black, Hispanic and White, etc. However it is always good to have an understanding of one’s cultural differences.

Come out and meet Tiffany Rae Reid in person as she will be presenting, Business Opportunities for Women, Presented by Successful Women, Thursday January 26, 2012 from 7:00pm to 9:00pm at the Collingswood Senior Community Center Ballroom, 30 W. Collings Avenue, Collingswood, NJ 08108. Just steps from the PATCO Speed line between Haddon Avenue and Collings Road.  There is an advanced registration of $20 which includes complementary make-up touches from Motives, raffles, door prizes, Hors d’oeuvre, networking, massages and professional photos. More than 20 companies will be present. For more information call 201-450-3210 or register at www.tiffanyraecoaching.com/mediaevents.

By Chris Collins

 If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

The Nation’s Premier Faith-Based and Professional Newspaper for Winners, “The Anointed News Journal” Celebrates 18 Years of Service with Its Second Annual Black Tie Fundraising Gala

Chris Collins, CEO and Editor-In-Chief of the Anointed News Journal, along with 200 exclusive guest celebrated 18 years of services at the Mansion on Main Street during the Christmas Holiday festivities.

Camden, NJ – Since 1994 the vision of the nation’s premier and leading news publication offering great information and resources to its readers across the country has been the motivation behind a small city preacher that has made his name known to people everywhere.  Reverend Chris Collins of Camden, New Jersey has been at the forefront of making positive change in the lives of people.  Whether he does it as a motivational speaker, pastor, mentor, employer, partner, coach, and collaborator or simply as a friend, he has touched the lives of people in more than 28 states and 3 countries.

Chris Collins has served as a minister for the past 24 years in Camden City.  He has served with the former Camden Miracle Center Church - under the late Allen Byrd, Gilmer’s House of Prayer Church of God – under the late Bishop Aaron Gilmer, Little Rock Baptist Church – under the former Pastor Robert H. Gordon, Sr., First Refuge Baptist Church – under the late Dr. George T. Hairston and currently collaborates with the Rehoboth Rebirth & Restoration Church of Washington, DC – under Bishop Keith J. Martin. Throughout the years as CEO of a leading faith-based newspaper in the United States of America, Rev. Collins has written stories, highlighted ministries and given voice to congregations large and small. From the national mega ministries of the Abundant Harvest – under the leadership of Bishop David G. Evans to the small storefront ministries of Pastor Lamont Bailey, Pillar of Hope Temple of Deliverance, in Philadelphia, PA.

For 18 years the Anointed News Journal has provided press coverage on many of the nation’s top events including; The Million Man March, The Million Women March, World Day of Atonement, Black EXPO USA, National Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Convention, Susan G. Coleman Celebration of Life, President Bill Clinton, President Barack Obama, September 11th, NBA (Pro Basketball), NFL (Pro Football), Philadelphia Phillies World Series, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dedication, NAACP Conventions, NJBIC (NJ Black Issues Convention), Urban League, Miss Malawi South Africa, AFRICOM Command Germany, Live Aid, Gospel Slam, Power of Cod Convention, US Olympic Games, Y2K, United States of Africa, Death of Michael Jackson, Philadelphia Mayoral Race, NJ Governors Race, Camden City, US Marine Corps Reserves Toys For Tots Campaigns, President George W. Bush Prisoner Reentry Initiative, JENA Six, Miracle on Broad Street, African American Cultural Expo, Camden Reunion Concert, Universal Soul Circus, and a host of headlines giving grass-roots leaders the opportunity to be heard.  In his many years of service and leading the charge on many causes, Collins has remained unselfish and has not asked for anything in return.  “I’m just a humble man trying to do my part to build leadership in the Kingdom of God and in the urban community”, said Collins.

During the end of the year holiday festivities, the Anointed News Journal hosted its second annual, “Christmas with Chris Collins” Black Tie Gala and Fundraiser honoring 13 individuals with the Circle of Winner Nominee Awards.  The Black Tie Gala was originally designed to honor Rev. Collins for his efforts to provide quality service to the public in an unselfish manner. However, he would not allow the staff to make it about him.  With this in mind each year he selects several people throughout the area that has made positive strides in all walks of life just the same as he.

The honorees selected were; Yocontalie “Connie” Jackson - Jackson & Associates Construction Management and Grammy Nominee Poet, Tyrone Pitts – Arline Institute and Arline Construction, Emery Troy – Founder of the Dooley House, NJ State Assemblyman Gilbert “Whip” Wilson, Pastor Garland Jones – Rocky Mount, NC, Rev. Tony C. Evans – Tenth Street Baptist Church, Carla C.T. Riley – 1460 WIFI Radio “An Array of Hope”, Dr. Jon Regis – Reliance Medical Group, Minister Wasim Muhammad – Muhammads Temple # 23, Gloucester Twp Councilwoman Crystal Evans, Wanda Dickerson – Unity Community Center, Brad Hawkins – NJPBA and Lazarus Lodge #001, and Mark Bryant – CEO CAMcare Health Corp.  Honorees were presented with the crystal globe representing having the world at their fingertips.  Musical selection was rendered by jazz recording artist and saxophonist Dwain Davis. DJ services were provided by Pastor Darryl Farrar.

“The Mansion on Main Street was the perfect place for this year gala.  Our first year we set the tone with a very eloquent affair at the Aquarium in Camden and this year we stepped up another level by having it at the Mansion,” said Collins. “Thanks to Donna and the staff of the Mansion my guest had a wonderful time with all of the bells and whistles,” he added.

The overall purpose of the annual Black Tie Gala is to raise financial contributions for the growth of the nation’s premier faith-based newspaper for winners, The Anointed News Journal.  As Rev. Collins leads his team into the New Year he shared his vision of launching an online publication within the next few weeks, www.anointedonline.com.  Rev. Collins shared his thoughts and plea to the readers of ANJ.

“For 18 years it has been a pleasure providing a quality service to the people of Camden, NJ and around the nation.  While many publications seek to destroy the image of a community, the Anointed News Journal continues to build it up.  We have shared your positive stories with people around the world.  The Anointed News Journal has been in places in this country and abroad that I might never get to.  Yet we are able to make an impact in those places. I am personally asking you who are faithful readers of the Anointed News Journal to help us to continue to spread the good news.  Please do not take for granted that we can survive without the support of our readers.  Please do not take for granted that we do not need your support.  I’m sharing with you now, that the Anointed News Journal needs the support of every individual that reads it.

Every media company in the world has fundraising campaigns and we are no different.  Every ministry in the world needs the financial support of its parishioners. If you attend a service at a local church, you leave an offering.  If you get the daily newspaper which destroys the image of your city, you pay for it. Today I’m asking you to look at the Anointed News Journal in the same way or even greater.  For 18 years we have served the public without acquiring strong financial contributions. Now it’s time for us to ask the public to make a financial contribution to the continuance of this ministry.  I’m asking each person to sow a seed today. Whatever amount you feel is on your heart is what we need and there is no amount to small or too large.  Mail all contribution to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, NJ 08101. Or call 856-904-9429 to make a credit card transaction.  Become a friend to the Anointed News Journal by subscribing to home delivery of 6 months for only $10.

If you are in business and need to advertise, we can offer you great exposure at an affordable rate.  We were recently recognized on Google as the “Best Place to Advertise for Philadelphia and South Jersey”. Our small business and nonprofit ads run from $150 to $560 per month.  If you can’t afford that, we have a $30 business card ad that everyone can do.  Our goal is to serve 1000 business owners and churches for 2012 with our business card directory. Call 856-904-9429 for more information. In addition, we are looking for self motivated individuals who are interested in joining our team of professionals.  No experience necessary. We offer training and orientation each Thursday 4:30pm at 129 Market Street, Camden, NJ 08102,” said Collins.

I have been fortunate to work with a business leader and great man of God for many years.  Chris Collins and his work is no stranger to the community.  Join me in making a contribution to the man and the publication that has certainly made many contributions to our society and Christian community as a whole.

By LaKeysha Skinner

   If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

The Anointed News Journal Seeks the Support of Its Readers

Camden, New Jersey – For 18 years the nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper, “The Anointed News Journal” has been at the forefront of providing positive press and sharing God’s people and their accomplishments around the country and in some parts of the world.  Established in January of 1995, ANJ has led the charge for many causes and have made dynamic impacts not only in Camden City but in major cities around the country.

The Anointed News Journal in its efforts to develop leadership among the children has trained hundreds of children in the greater Philadelphia tri-state area in journalism, photography, art, athletics and entrepreneurship.  We have been fortunate to see the many fruits of our labor blossom with many of our mentees have graduated from college and some have even started businesses. We have been at the forefront of taking inner-city youth on educational journeys to Tampa, Florida, Columbus, Ohio, Atlanta Georgia, New York City and Washington, DC. Many of those children have prospered into productive citizens. We are proud to serve our community at large and the many business owners that we are able to assist in accomplishing their mission.

Today as with any business that is surviving during these tough economic times, the Anointed News Journal has used innovation to expand its outreach by implementing an online presence at www.anointedonline.net and by launching new strategies designed to keep us a float in times as such. What we are asking every reader of this publication to do is to make a contribution to our cause.  Just look around. Every daily newspaper in this market and possibly across the country has downsized, eliminated jobs and some have even shut their doors forever. To those residents of Camden, New Jersey, the Anointed News Journal is the only true newspaper that is from Camden and sharing positive press about Camden people.  Yet throughout the years we have never gained the financial support of the City in which we love.  We are asking you to do so now.  Although we are not in a position of considering closing our doors, we are simply asking for those of you who enjoy reading this publication and those of you who have benefited from this publication to simply consider giving back to it so we can continue to bless another in the same way.

The Anointed News Journal is and has always been a free publication. Our only fees are for home delivery and advertising.  We survive off advertising dollars and due to a struggling economy not many businesses have the budget to maintain an aggressive marketing strategy. In order for all of us to continue to carry out our mission, it takes the help of total community.  I the editor, Chris Collins, which many of you have met me personally, am asking you to give.  Any way or any amount you give all helps for us to continue production. If every reader simply gave $1 we could meet the cost of production with no problem. I’d hate to hear people one day say, “Whatever happened to that newspaper, the Anointed News Journal?” The fact is that can be possible if you don’t give back.  Please understand people pay for the other newspapers that only destroy our name and character of our city. People pay to read about all of the junk.  The Anointed News Journal writes powerful stories of winners and people who are making a true difference.  We help the small business person when others turn their backs.  It’s time to give back.  The Anointed News Journal can set anyone up with a monthly transaction for those who would like to use their credit card if cash is not available.  We are asking you to consider donating as little as $3 a month. Our virtual merchant account is secured and easy to manage. Those who would like to write a check make it payable to the Anointed News Journal, P. O. Box 309, Camden, NJ 08101. Those who would like to stop in and meet me personally can do so at our office located at 129 Market Street, Camden, NJ 08102 along the Camden Waterfront. To the many churches that the Anointed News Journal has been delivering to for 18 years, please consider making contributions or taking up a collection.  For 18 years tens of thousands of Gods’ saints have received this newspaper for free and now it’s time to give back.  The Bible says, “Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you.” (Matthew 7:7) and (James 4:2) “You have not, because you ask not.” Today I am asking you to make a contribution to this ministry and this good work. To set up a credit card transaction, contact me directly at 856-904-9429 or anjeditor@verizon.net.

By Chris Collins
CEO/Editor-In-Chief

   If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

Choosing Everyday Pleasures Over Protecting Your Family Can Lead to Disaster
A Few Pointers to Protect Your Income and Your Family

By Stephanie Moore

Sicklerville, NJ – During these tough economic times, many Americans are struggling financially and are forced to decide what services are most important to their family and which services they can do without.

As crazy as it might sound, some families will choose to pay for cable television and disregard paying for auto insurance, mortgage insurance and even life insurance.  Some might even pay for services at the local hair salon or nail salon and disregard their gas or electric bill. 

It seems at times that people take gambles believing that time is on their side when it comes to taking care of financial responsibilities with the things in life that should matter the most.  For instance, some will drive their automobile without car insurance taking a chance of getting into an accident without being covered. Whatever the reasoning behind the choices people make sometimes we just need to do what is right.  What is right to be in compliance with the law and what is right to protect those we love most.

Stephanie Moore is a woman who is a professional in financial services and through life’s personal experiences, she’s on a mission to educate people on income protection (life insurance), debt elimination, saving money and planning for retirement.

Stephanie Moore is a representative with replicable financial services company, which is a company that educates people on how money works and offers entrepreneur opportunities. During an exclusive interview with the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal”, she shares her outlook and why she is so passionate in her quest to bring awareness to people as our nation is experiencing tough economic times.

Collins:
What is a financial service?

Stephanie:
A financial service is anything that is dealing with your finances.  Anything that your banks do, your financial services company will do as well, except cash your paychecks. When talking about financial services, we are talking about life insurance and investments.  Insurances such as long term care, auto and mortgages (first and second and refinances).

Collins:
Why is it important for individuals to have life insurance and who should be covered?

Stephanie:
It is very important for people to have life insurance. We’ve been programmed to think it’s only necessary for us to have car insurance.  State Government makes it mandatory for people to have car insurance and homeowners insurance but not life insurance. I would put life insurance right there with your mortgage. I categorize life insurance as income protection.  Its life insurance but it’s also protecting our income.

Everyone should be covered. There is something called, “theory of decreasing responsibility”. That means in the early years when you are young and have the most responsibility, you need to be covered.  You have young children, a home and possibly a lot of debt.  If you or your spouse were to die, that income is now missing. You still have the children that will continue to go to school, the mortgage still has to be paid and your debt has to be cleared up.  Therefore in your younger years you need a lot of life insurance coverage. In your older years you do not need as much because your responsibilities decrease.  Your house is paid off, you don’t have a lot of debt, your children are all grown up and you are now living off the money that you supposedly have been saving throughout the years in between.

Collins:
Should parents have life insurance policies for their children?

Stephanie:
Children should be covered.  I just recently had a three year old nephew that passed away and it still cost for funeral expenses.  Although children do not bring an income into the home, no one knows the time of when someone will die. Yes, parents should have a policy for their children but it should not be a whole lot but enough to take care of final expenses.

Collins:
It is the State law for people to have auto insurance and homeowners insurance to protect people in the event of an accident.  Should it be required for people to have life insurance?

Stephanie:
Definitely! Auto and homeowners insurance is to protect that other person in case something happens.  What about your family? You should want to protect your family because they are more important than the car or home.  Some people sacrifice to afford car insurance and homeowners insurance but look at life insurance as something unaffordable and definitely unnecessary.

Collins:
Why are you so passionate to teach financial literacy and educate people on how money works and life insurance?

Stephanie:
With the company I represent, our crusade is to sell term life insurance. Our mission is to go out and replace whole life insurance because we believe that term is better.  It’s better because term insurance allows you to be in control of you own money.  A whole life insurance policy has a cash value account, like an investment account, attached to your life insurance policy. We are educating families and explaining that you do not need to have a cash value account attached to your life insurance.  Just like you don’t have a savings account attached to your homeowner or auto insurance.  We stress that if you are going to have a cash value account or investment attached to your life insurance, keep them separate. That way you have control of them both.  A whole life policy, the savings account that companies are saying you can accumulate, they keep.  The only way you get your savings if you cancel the policy or borrow it. If you die, you cannot get the savings and the death benefit.  If you borrow the savings and die before you repay it, your family will get the death benefit minus what you owe.

On the flip side of that, with term insurance, you have your life insurance and your investment account. They are two separate accounts and when you die your beneficiary will get both.

My personal experience is what makes me so passionate about educating people on this matter. I’ve had several family members to pass away in cases where there was no life insurance and we had to come up with money to bury my niece, my nephew and my husband.  When my husband passed, it was a good thing that his mother had a policy on him. As a result we were able to give him a nice funeral.  I’m passionate because I know it’s necessary. Once you’ve experienced death with no life insurance you would understand that it’s an absolute must.

When my husband died, my children were 7 and 14 and still in school.  We still had the house and my husband was the breadwinner of the house.  My little income contributed but it could not cover the expenses.  If we had kept our life insurance policy, it would have made a big difference. Of course, that’s why I’m so passionate because of my experiences.

I think people are not aware that the cost of life insurance is reasonable and cost less than that carton of cigarettes someone might be going out to buy. That’s killing you.  The goal is to sit down with people and educate people on why it’s important to have it and the cost of it.

Collins:
Many people understand the importance of having life insurance; yet in today’s struggling economy, might not understand the importance of maintaining it and paying the premiums. Why is it important to keep the premiums paid?

Stephanie:
It’s very important and best to get insured when you are young and insurable. We are insuring people who are 21 years old.  Even a 15 year old can get insured if on their parent’s policy. When you are young, you are strong and healthy but as you grow older you develop health issues and then you get rated with a higher premium.  If you have high blood, sugar or other health problems or long-term illnesses, you will pay more.

In the case of my husband, we had insurance for quite some time. During the time he was sick and could not work as often, it became hard to keep up with the bills and the premium payment. Once we realized we had missed the insurance payment, it was just one payment, the policy lapsed. When we went to reinstate the policy, we could not because my husband had developed cancer. Now people have to prove insurability. If you cannot prove insurability, companies will either rate you or deny you coverage.

Collins:
Are you saying that you had your life insurance policy for years and due to financial hardships, you missed one payment and the policy lapsed. And when you went to reinstate it, you were denied because your husband became ill?

Stephanie:
Companies can do that and it’s legal.  It’s important to get insurance and to keep it. Life insurance is just as important as the mortgage payment.  You could die in your sleep but at least your family is taken care of.

Collins:
It has been noticed that when someone is the beneficiary of a policy and receives compensation that they often participate in wasteful spending, only to run out of money in a short amount of time. How should life insurance be handled when a beneficiary is compensated?

Stephanie:
That’s a good question. Another thing we do is sit down and figure out how much coverage someone needs according to their financial situation.  We do what is called a “DIME”; D-debt, I-income, M-mortgage and E-education of the children. We calculate based on the total amount of debt you have or it could be your death benefit as which is your funeral cost and your income.  We multiply the person’s income by five years because we want the deceased person’s income to last at least five years. We take into consideration what they owe on the home and the education of the children who may go to college or private school. By the time we finish calculating, you might need a couple hundred thousand in coverage. When something happens to either person, you know where to apply the money to.  A portion for funeral expenses, this amount will replace that income of my spouse and this is for the mortgage, etc.

When we come to deliver that check to a family, we sit with them and go over this again. Our goal is to help them invest some of it so they can make even more money for the next ten to twenty years.

We do a free Financial Needs Analysis (FNA), which is a report that shows where you are in your finances and where you want to be in the future. Based on what you tell us, we can show you how much money you will need to save in order to reach your goal for retirement. Many times, your monthly amount to save might not be affordable at that time but at least you have a snapshot of how to get to where you want to be for retirement.  Although many banks and financial companies do charge for a financial needs analysis, we do it for free.

Collins:
People often think of insurance as an additional high premium item. Is there a difference in the cost of term insurance and whole life insurance?

Stephanie:
Yes. Term insurance is less expensive.  You get more coverage and pay a smaller premium for a specific amount of time. For the term of the policy which is for a certain number of years.  Whole life insurance gives you less coverage for more money but it covers you for 100 years.  However, the theory of decreasing responsibility is that you don’t need life insurance your whole life. Oprah, Bill Gates and Ray Crock don’t need life insurance because they have money. If you have money or wealth, you don’t need life insurance. Again, life insurance is to protect your income.

Collins:
Should people who have a life insurance policy from their employer get additional coverage?

Stephanie:
Absolutely. Your insurance on the job is just that.  If you lose your job, you lose your life insurance. Therefore it’s best to have outside coverage too.  When you work for someone, they have control over all of your benefits.  Even if you do not lose your job, the employer might decide not to provide that benefit any longer.  You should also get the additional insurance while you are young and insurable.

Collins:
Are you able to provide services to people who want to get life insurance?

Stephanie:
Yes. We are able to provide services to people who want life insurance.  The company I represent has a few products, “Term Now and Custom Advantage.”  “Term Now”, you do not have to prove insurability. Just understand that if you have health issues, you don’t have to take a medical exam but all insurance companies use what is called the “MIB”, Medical Information Bureau. Here they will still check you out even though you are not going through a physical exam.  “Custom Advantage”, is for coverage over $150,000. With this you will have to go through a physical including blood work.

Collins:
Can people get insured with health issues?

Stephanie:
Everybody can be insured but can you afford the rates.  Companies will insure someone with high blood pressure or diabetes, etc., but you might pay a higher premium than someone the same age with no health issues.  A smoker will pay three times as much as a nonsmoker. It’s been proven that smoking causes lung cancer and that is why you will pay more.

Collins:
How can people get in contact with you to inquire more about your services? Do you offer informational workshops for families, churches or businesses?

Stephanie:
We offer workshops monthly. We just held a seminar entitled, “Marriage and Money.” We usually post flyers for local events.  If you want to have me come to your place of business, worship or residence, contact me at 856-723-7823 or by email at kiracenay@yahoo.com. Generally we go to people homes and sit with them and educate them on our products as well as offering people our business opportunity.

Because our company’s crusade is so huge, not only do we offer term life insurance but we also offer people the opportunity to come on board as a representative.  We haven’t even scratched the surface as far as getting the word out about how money works.  Our company is always looking for representatives.  We have excellent incentives. Currently, we have a training bonus of $1000 when people come on board. They also pay for your life license as well as your securities license.  It’s a business opportunity, not a job.  If you can dedicate eight hours a week, you can make some decent money.

Collins:
What do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Stephanie:
Our mission is to make people aware of the importance of having life insurance or income protection. That’s exactly what needs to happen, everyone needs to be aware of how important it is to have life insurance and putting off until tomorrow instead of today is the wrong choice.  That’s all I can say. We all know when we were born but there’s no date or time that we know when we will die.  When you sit back and think of your family, ask yourself, how much do I love your family? The answer should be I love them enough to protect them.

Collins:
What makes your company different then other companies?

Stephanie:
The company I represent targets average and ordinary people. We sit down with families and educate them on finances and keep it simple.  When they came to talk to me about planning for my retirement, it was very easy for me to understand. The company kept in touch with me and really personalized it.

Collins:
Stephanie Moore is passionate and very good at what she does.  It’s unfortunate that she had to experience the tragedy of losing a loved one and not being able to benefit from a policy that she had for years and paid thousands of dollars into. I often hear of people who travelled the same road. As our nation experiences terrible financial times, I can only imaging the numbers of Americans policies that have lapse each day.

Throughout the years I’ve had numerous life insurance policies lapse due to financial struggles. I’ve experience having coverage on the job and the employer doing away with that benefit. I thank God that I currently have coverage because I truly understand the need for it.  Eighteen years ago I to had to bury two of my sons and had no life insurance for them because of their age. However, there were still funeral expenses that had to be paid.  Death does not care about the age or gender of its victim. Now that I have kids in college and driving these dangerous highways of life, it is absolutely mandatory that I have a policy not only for myself, but for each member of my family as well. I encourage you that if you are not covered with a life insurance policy, call Stephanie Moore today. It’s easy to put it off until tomorrow, but as we all know, here today, gone tomorrow. I say, “Here today and gone today”. Call Stephanie Moore, 856-723-7823.

By Chris Collins

 If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

FINANCE 101

By Stephanie Moore

10-10-80 Rule:

Paying yourself first can lead to financial independence.

Wouldn’t it have been wonderful if Finance 101 was a prerequisite in order to graduate high school?  The class would consist of lessons in saving and investing, debt elimination, life insurance, planning for retirement, college funds, budgeting, estate planning etc.

If these lessons were taught while we were young, we would know how to plan for our financial future.  The key word here is PLAN; people do not plan to fail when it comes to their money however they do fail to plan.  

No matter what your income level, you can achieve financial security if you take the time to learn a few simple principles about how money works.

YOU CAN get out of debt.

YOU CAN build savings.

YOU CAN get on the path to financial independence!

By applying the simple principles that I will provide in this column each month, you can achieve financial security and ultimately reach your goals.  But nobody else can make it happen.  It’s up to you.  You have the power to change your life forever if you have a plan in place and you stick to the plan. 

TAKE CONTROL.  It doesn’t matter what you make….it does matter what you get to keep.  With this said, pay yourself first. The 10-10-80 rule means that 10% of your income goes to tithing, 10% to paying yourself and 80% for everything else. Paying yourself first means placing God, yourself and your family before any other demands on your money.  For instance, if you receive a tax refund or any form of compensation, whether large or small you can apply a portion of this into an interest bearing account where your money has an opportunity to work for you.  Interest in this form may be considered as free money.  The perception is that it takes a lot of money to invest, however with some companies you can start an investment with as low as $50.  Often times, you can utilize money you are already spending by having a financial representative prepare a financial needs analysis that will restructure your finances.

Although spending your money on pleasurable things such as restaurants, social entertainment, shopping malls, hair-nail salons may seem as though you are paying yourself first, the fact of the matter is you are not gaining a return on the money you are spending.  The goal is to get free money (interest) so that you can have more money.

Deposit a set amount each and every month into an investment program, no matter what other financial obligations you have.  It’s amazing how fast your money can grow if you invest even a small amount regularly, at a good rate of return. 

To receive a free Financial Needs Analysis, contact Stephanie Moore, your local financial service representative 856-723-7823.

It’s time to break the cycle of brokenness and teach our families how to become financially independent.

Stephanie Moore is committed to helping families obtain financial independence through education and a variety of financial services as well as a business opportunity if there’s a need to earn extra income.

Look for this column every month in the Anointed News Journal.

 If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

FINANCE 101

By Stephanie Moore

Pay Yourself First

Problem: At the end of the month, most people don’t have anything left to save.

Solution: At the first of the month, write a check to yourself for 10% of your income. 

Paying yourself first may be the single most important lesson in finance. It is the key to having savings.

It’s Not What You Earn, It’s What You Keep

“There is treasure to be desired and oil in the dwelling of the wise; but a foolish man spends it up.” Proverbs 21:20

 

Put yourself at the head of the line. Treat your savings like any other recurring bill that you must pay each month.  Dedicate the appropriate amount from your paycheck and set it aside.  While most people think nothing of sending enormous amounts of money to credit card companies on a regular and systematic basis, they bark at the idea of paying themselves first! Change that mindset.  Cut up your credit cards and put those payments into your own savings. Make a commitment to pay yourself.

Here are three questions I want you to ask yourself.

1. What will happen to my family if I die too soon?

2. What will happen if my spouse and I live too long?

3. Will I (we) have enough money to live out the rest of my days with dignity?

 

We all know that death is inevitable, so for those of you that are worried about leaving the wife, husband or children behind along with the rent/mortgage, bills etc; You need to ask yourself, do I have life insurance in case I die too soon or do I have enough life insurance to assure that my income will be replaced, my kids can still go to college, my home is paid off and all debt is settled.

 

For those of you that are worried about outliving your retirement savings, you need to ask yourself how can I increase my return on my 401k or get a better return on my Roth IRA.  If you are new to the investment world, how can I start an investment so that I can get a higher return on my savings?

 

The Three Accounts You Should Have

To have a complete savings program, most people need three types of basic accounts.

1. Emergency Fund: this is your reserve fund in the event of an unforeseen emergency, job loss or an unexpected expense.  Set a goal of having three to six months’ salary in your emergency fund.

2. Short-Term Savings: This account is for money that you set aside for expenses you want to purchase within a short time frame. For example, here is where you would save for a vacation, computer etc.

3. Long-Term Savings/Investments:  Here is where your retirement savings, college fund and other long range savings will go.  These savings have more of a long term timeframe; you can use investment vehicles with potential for a higher rate of return, such as equity mutual funds.

To receive a free Financial Needs Analysis or any of our financial services; contact Stephanie Moore, your local financial service representative 856-723-7823.

It’s time to break the cycle of brokenness and teach our families how to become financially independent.

Financial Empowerment seminars held every Thursday, call for more information.

 

Stephanie Moore is committed to helping families obtain financial independence through education and a variety of financial services as well as a business opportunity if there’s a need to earn extra income.

Look for this column every month in the Anointed News Journal.

 If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

FINANCE 101

SHOULD YOU HAVE LIFE INSURANCE ON YOUR CHILD?

By Stephanie Moore

In my previous article we talked about the importance of having life insurance. How we should view life insurance as income protection.  We discussed the importance of buying the right kind of life insurance. Why term insurance is better than whole life/ cash value insurance. Also, the importance of knowing the amount of coverage needed based on your household expenses and the income of the deceased person. 

This month let’s talk about whether or not you should have life insurance on your children?

Ordinarily, I am educating a family that although we need to carry insurance on our children there is no need to have a lot of coverage.  Unlike the parent(s), the kids are generally not contributing income to the household.  So parents would only need to carry enough insurance to pay for the child’s funeral and burial, which can cost anywhere from $10,000 to $20,000.

If tragedy strikes and a child die, parents may find it difficult to pay for burial expenses.  An unexpected death can place a financial burden on a family if there is no life insurance. Children's life insurance policies are inexpensive, and there are different options from which you can choose if you only want to insure possible funeral expenses. You can purchase low cost term life insurance with a death benefit of $10,000 often for less than $10 a month. Another alternative is to add your child as a rider to your own life insurance policy, in which case the coverage will cost you less than $10 in additional premium. A child can be a rider on a policy until he reaches the age of 24 years old with our company.  It varies among life insurance companies. Once a child becomes of age, he can take over the policy on his own. Since there is already a life insurance policy in place, the child will not be subject to pre-existing exclusions for health problems or disabilities when he is an adult. This can be a significant advantage if by adulthood a child has some medical problems and needs life insurance.

Premiums cost less for a child than for an adult. Buying life insurance for your child may be a smart move if chronic illnesses like diabetes or heart disease run in your family. Even if your child does not develop these diseases, waiting to get life insurance later on as an adult could significantly increase the cost of the premiums. However, if your child is predisposed to certain chronic health conditions, you will want to purchase an adequate amount of life insurance.

Although both sides of the issue of buying life insurance for children offer a number of pros and cons. One argument is that, although a child's death can have heartbreaking and emotionally devastating consequences, in most cases, it does not reduce a family's income. Loss of wages is usually a primary motive for purchasing life insurance. Another argument is the possibility that the child may be uninsurable as an adult. However, most healthy 20-year-olds can still qualify to buy life insurance at an affordable cost.

Whether or not you can afford to buy life insurance for your child may be irrelevant unless you purchase enough life insurance for yourself. If you are a wage earner, your family definitely needs the protection in the event of your sudden or premature death. Nowadays, most people can get life insurance. The only catch is if your family has a history of poor health or inherited diseases or if you develop a chronic illness prior to purchasing life insurance, your premiums are going to cost you more. So, with this being said if you love your family DO NOT PUT OFF PROTECTING THEM.

I am a state licensed life insurance agent and financial coach.  Please contact me if you are interested in a life insurance quote, 856-723-7823.

Financial Empowerment seminars held every Thursday@ 7PM,                       
141 S. Blackhorse Pike, Ste. 106, Blackwood, NJ 08021.   Call to confirm attendance.

Stephanie Moore is committed to helping families obtain financial independence through education and a variety of financial services as well as a business opportunity if there’s a need to earn extra income.

 If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

September Is National Life Insurance Awareness Month
A Few Pointers to Protect Your Income and Your Family

 By Stephanie Moore

 Sicklerville, NJ – During the month of September, our nation acknowledges, “Life Insurance Awareness”.  During these tough economic times, many Americans are struggling financially and are forced to decide what services are most important to their family and which services they can do without.

 As crazy as it might sound, some families will choose to pay for cable television and disregard paying for auto insurance, mortgage insurance and even life insurance.  Some might even pay for services at the local hair salon or nail salon and disregard their gas or electric bill. 

It seems at times that people take gambles believing that time is on their side when it comes to taking care of financial responsibilities with the things in life that should matter the most.  For instance, some will drive their automobile without car insurance taking a chance of getting into an accident without being covered. Whatever the reasoning behind the choices people make sometimes we just need to do what is right.  What is right to be in compliance with the law and what is right to protect those we love most.

Stephanie Moore is a woman who is a professional in financial services and through life’s personal experiences, she’s on a mission to educate people on income protection (life insurance), debt elimination, saving money and planning for retirement.

Stephanie Moore is a District Leader with PRIMERICA, which is a company that educates people on how money works and offers entrepreneur opportunities. During an exclusive interview with the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal”, she shares her outlook and why she is so passionate in her quest to bring awareness to people as our nation is experiencing tough economic times.

Collins:
What is a financial service?

 Stephanie:
A financial service is anything that is dealing with your finances.  Anything that your banks do, your financial services company will do as well, except cash your paychecks. When talking about financial services, we are talking about life insurance and investments.  Insurances such as long term care, auto and mortgages (first and second and refinances).

Collins:
September is “National Life Insurance Awareness Month”. Why is it important for individuals to have life insurance and who should be covered?

 Stephanie:
It’s excellent that the government acknowledges life insurance awareness month. It is very important for people to have life insurance. We’ve been programmed to think it’s only necessary for us to have car insurance.  State Government makes it mandatory for people to have car insurance and homeowners insurance but not life insurance. I would put life insurance right there with your mortgage. I categorize life insurance as income protection.  Its life insurance but it’s also protecting our income.  

Everyone should be covered. There is something called, “theory of decreasing responsibility”. That means in the early years when you are young and have the most responsibility, you need to be covered.  You have young children, a home and possibly a lot of debt.  If you or your spouse were to die, that income is now missing. You still have the children that will continue to go to school, the mortgage still has to be paid and your debt has to be cleared up.  Therefore in your younger years you need a lot of life insurance coverage. In your older years you do not need as much because your responsibilities decrease.  Your house is paid off, you don’t have a lot of debt, your children are all grown up and you are now living off the money that you supposedly have been saving throughout the years in between.

Collins:
Should parents have life insurance policies for their children?  

Stephanie:
Children should be covered.  I just recently had a three years old nephew that passed away and it still cost for funeral expenses.  Although children do not bring an income into the home, no one knows the time of when someone will die. Yes, parents should have a policy for their children but it should not be a whole lot but enough to take care of final expenses.  

Collins:
It is the State law for people to have auto insurance and homeowners insurance to protect people in the event of an accident.  Should it be required for people to have life insurance?

Stephanie:
Definitely! Auto and homeowners insurance is to protect that other person in case something happens.  What about your family? You should want to protect your family because they are more important than the car or home.  Some people sacrifice to afford car insurance and homeowners insurance but look at life insurance as something unaffordable and definitely unnecessary.  

Collins:
Why are you so passionate to teach financial literacy and educate people on how money works and life insurance?  

Stephanie:
At PRIMERICA, our crusade is to sell term life insurance. Our mission is to go out and replace whole life insurance because we believe that term is better.  It’s better because term insurance allows you to be in control of you own money.  A whole life insurance policy has a cash value account, like an investment account, attached to your life insurance policy. We are educating families and explaining that you do not need to have a cash value account attached to your life insurance.  Just like you don’t have a savings account attached to your homeowner or auto insurance.  We stress that if you are going to have a cash value account or investment attached to your life insurance, keep them separate. That way you have control of them both.  A whole life policy, the savings account that companies are saying you can accumulate, they keep.  The only way you get your savings if you cancel the policy or borrow it. If you die, you cannot get the savings and the death benefit.  If you borrow the savings and die before you repay it, your family will get the death benefit minus what you owe.  

On the flip side of that, with term insurance, you have your life insurance and your investment account. They are two separate accounts and when you die your beneficiary will get both.  

My personal experience is what makes me so passionate about educating people on this matter. I’ve had several family members to pass away in cases where there was no life insurance and we had to come up with money to bury my nice, my nephew and my husband.  When my husband passed, it was a good thing that his mother had a policy on him. As a result we were able to give him a nice funeral.  I’m passionate because I know it’s necessary. Once you’ve experienced death with no life insurance you would understand that it’s an absolute must.  

When my husband died, my children were 7 and 14 and still in school.  We still had the house and my husband was the breadwinner of the house.  My little income contributed but it could not cover the expenses.  If we had kept our life insurance policy, it would have made a big difference. Of course, that’s why I’m so passionate because of my experiences.  

I think people are not aware that the cost of life insurance is reasonable and cost less than that carton of cigarettes someone might be going out to buy. That’s killing you.  The goal is to sit down with people and educate people on why it’s important to have it and the cost of it.  

Collins:
Many people understand the importance of having life insurance; yet in today’s struggling economy, might not understand the importance of maintaining it and paying the premiums. Why is it important to keep the premiums paid?  

Stephanie:
It’s very important and best to get insured when you are young and insurable. We are insuring people who are 21 years old.  Even a 15 year old can get insured if on their parent’s policy. When you are young, you are strong and healthy but as you grow older you develop health issues and then you get rated with a higher premium.  If you have high blood, sugar or other health problems or long-term illnesses, you will pay more.

In the case of my husband, we had insurance for quite some time. During the time he was sick and could not work as often, it became hard to keep up with the bills and the premium payment. Once we realized we had missed the insurance payment, it was just one payment, the policy lapsed. When we went to reinstate the policy, we could not because my husband had developed cancer. Now people have to prove insurability. If you cannot prove insurability, companies will either rate you or deny you coverage.  

Collins:
Are you saying that you had your life insurance policy for years and due to financial hardships, you missed one payment and the policy lapsed. And when you went to reinstate it, you were denied because your husband became ill?  

Stephanie:
Companies can do that and it’s legal.  It’s important to get insurance and to keep it. Life insurance is just as important as the mortgage payment.  You could die in your sleep but at least your family is taken care of.  

Collins:
It has been noticed that when someone is the beneficiary of a policy and receives compensation that they often participate in wasteful spending, only to run out of money in a short amount of time. How should life insurance be handled when a beneficiary is compensated?  

Stephanie:
That’s a good question. Another thing we do is sit down and figure out how much coverage someone needs according to their financial situation.  We do what is called a “DIME”; D-debt, I-income, M-mortgage and E-education of the children. We calculate based on the total amount of debt you have or it could be your death benefit as which is your funeral cost and your income.  We multiply the person’s income by five years because we want the deceased person’s income to last at least five years. We take into consideration what they owe on the home and the education of the children who may go to college or private school. By the time we finish calculating, you might need a couple hundred thousand in coverage. When something happens to either person, you know where to apply the money to.  A portion for funeral expenses, this amount will replace that income of my spouse and this is for the mortgage, etc.  

When we come to deliver that check to a family, we sit with them and go over this again. Our goal is to help them invest some of it so they can make even more money for the next ten to twenty years.

We do a financial need analysis, which is a report that shows where you are in your finances and where you want to be in the future. Based on what you tell us, we can show you how much money you will need to save in order to reach your goal for retirement. Many times, your monthly amount to save might not be affordable at that time but at least you have a snapshot of how to get to where you want to be for retirement.  Although many banks and financial companies do charge for a financial needs analysis, we do it for free.  

Collins:
People often think of insurance as an additional high premium item. Is there a difference in the cost of term insurance and whole life insurance?  

Stephanie:
Yes. Term insurance is less expensive.  You get more coverage and pay a smaller premium for a specific amount of time. For the term of the policy which is for a certain number of years.  Whole life insurance gives you less coverage for more money but it covers you for 100 years.  However, the theory of decreasing responsibility is that you don’t need life insurance your whole life. Oprah, Bill Gates and Ray Crock don’t need life insurance because they have money. If you have money or wealth, you don’t need life insurance. Again, life insurance is to protect your income.  

Collins:
Should people who have a life insurance policy from their employer get additional coverage?  

Stephanie:
Absolutely. Your insurance on the job is just that.  If you lose your job, you lose your life insurance. Therefore it’s best to have outside coverage too.  When you work for someone, they have control over all of your benefits.  Even if you do not lose your job, the employer might decide not to provide that benefit any longer.  You should also get the additional insurance while you are young and insurable.

Collins:
Are you able to provide services to people who want to get life insurance?  

Stephanie:
Yes. We are able provide service to people who want life insurance.  Primerica has a few products, “Term Now and Custom Advantage.”  “Term Now”, you do not have to prove insurability. Just understand that if you have health issues, you don’t have to take a medical exam but all insurance companies use what is called the “MIB”, Medical Information Bureau. Here they will still check you out even though you are not going through a physical exam.  “Custom Advantage”, is for coverage over $150,000. With this you will have to go through a physical including blood work and a swab.  

Collins:
Can people get insured with health issues?  

Stephanie:
Everybody can be insured but can you afford the rates.  Companies will insure someone with high blood pressure or diabetes, etc., but you might pay a higher premium than someone the same age with no health issues.  A smoker will pay three times as much as a nonsmoker. It’s been proven that smoking causes lung cancer and that is why you will pay more.  

Collins:
How can people get in contact with you to inquire more about your services? Do you offer informational workshops for families, churches or businesses?  

Stephanie:
We offer workshops monthly at the Voorhees Library. We just held a seminar entitled, “Marriage and Money.” We usually post flyers for local events.  If you want to have me come to your place of business, worship or residence, contact me at 856-723-7823 or by email at kiracenay@yahoo.com. Generally we go to people homes and sit with them and educate them on our products as well as offering people our business opportunity.

Because our company’s crusade is so huge, not only do we offer term life insurance but we also offer people the opportunity to come on board as a representative.  We haven’t even scratched the surface as far as getting the word out about how money works.  PRIMERICA is always looking for representatives.  We have excellent incentives. Currently, we have a training bonus of $1200 when people come on board. They also pay for your life license as well as your securities license.  It’s a business opportunity, not a job.  If you can dedicate eight hours a week, you can make some decent money.  

Collins:
What do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?  

Stephanie:
I want to say, this is “Life Insurance Awareness Month” and that’s exactly what needs to happen, everyone needs to be aware of how important it is to have life insurance and putting off until tomorrow instead of today is the wrong choice.  That’s all I can say. We all know when we were born but there’s no date or time that we know when we will die.  When you sit back and think of your family, ask yourself, how much you love your family. The answer should be, you love them enough to protect them.

Collins:
What makes PRIMERICA different then other companies?  

Stephanie:
PRIMERICA targets average and ordinary people. We sit down with families and educate them on finances and keep it simple.  When they came to talk to me about planning for my retirement, it was very easy for me to understand. The company kept in touch with me and really personalized it.  

Collins:
Stephanie Moore is passionate and very good at what she does.  It’s unfortunate that she had to experience the tragedy of losing a loved one and not being able to benefit from a policy that she had for years and paid thousands of dollars into. I often hear of people who travelled the same road. As our nation experiences terrible financial times, I can only imaging the numbers of Americans policies that have lapse each day.  

Throughout the years I’ve had numerous life insurance policies lapse due to financial struggles. I’ve experience having coverage on the job and the employer doing away with that benefit. I thank God that I currently have coverage because I truly understand the need for it.  Eighteen years ago I too had to bury two of my sons and had no life insurance for them because of their age. However, there were still funeral expenses that had to be paid.  Death does not care about the age or gender of its victim. Now that I have kids in college and driving these dangerous highways of life, it is absolutely mandatory that I have a policy not only for myself, but for each member of my family as well. I encourage you that if you are not covered with a life insurance policy, call Stephanie Moore today. It’s easy to put it off until tomorrow, but as we all know, here today, gone tomorrow. I say, “Here today and today”. Call Stephanie Moore, 856-723-7823.  

By Chris Collins

  If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

 

 

 

Preserving the Past and Preparing for the Future

Historic Jacob’s Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church, Shares Its History from the Underground Railroad to Modern Ministry.

Pastor Terrell Person launches fundraising campaign to prepare for expansion of Mt. Laurel Church.

Mt. Laurel, NJ – Jacobs Chapel AME Church played a key role in the success of the underground railroad by being a familiar stop for people in this region. Now under the leadership of Pastor Terrell Person, the Chapel is noted for Coleman town Meeting House, circa (1813), which was a stop on the Underground Railroad.  It is also recognized for its cemetery; which holds notable Black Civil War Veterans and Dr. James Still, the Black Doctor of the Pines and Rev. Person’s great-great-great grandfather. Pastor Person has also been able to revitalize the church and its congregants, while maintaining the historical integrity of the church. In a recent interview with the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” Pastor Person shared his outlook with the readers.

Collins:
Jacobs Chapel has historically played a key role in the plight of African Americans migrating to the north since the
early 1800’s. Share with us a little of its history and where it is today.

 

Person:
Currently Jacobs Chapel is located at 311 Elbow Lane, Mt. Laurel, NJ.  Jacobs Chapel has been in existence since 1813. We have papers verifying this.  However I found out that some of those dates were incorrect but the buildings were in another location and then moved to where we are now. Our records really go back to pre-civil war with two buildings, one Jacobs Chapel AME Church and another on that property called Coleman town Meeting House.  Both buildings were significant stops on the Underground Railroad.  Before they were there, they used to meet at the Medford Crossroads.  There was a guy there by the name of Charles Coleman, which we thought his name was John Coleman, but after research we found it to be Charles, who the community was named after.  They used to meet at a Black school in Medford and then purchased the building and moved to 311 Elbow Lane in Mt. Laurel.  

I’ve been at Jacobs Chapel for over 20 years now.  Prior to that I was in construction and received a call to come to Jacobs Chapel and deal with the termites that were eating the building up.  As I was in the process of handing a young man a piece of lumber, the Spirit of the Lord just hit me.  The pastor of Jacobs Chapel had just died.  The Spirit told me to look around.  As I looked around I saw an old owl house and old buildings with a historic significance.  My great-great grandfather Dr. James Still was buried in that cemetery so I knew some of the history.  I looked at the community and saw these $300,000 to $400,000 homes and the Spirit said, “Whoever gets this charge will have a heavy responsibility.” Little did I know that 3 to 4 months later that would fall on me? When I got there, people would offer suggestions of what needed to be done with the buildings. Some thought we ought to have connected the two buildings.  Yet, God put in my spirit to preserve the past and prepare for the future.  We had 30 members.  God showed me this property across the street from the church. I didn’t tell anyone, not even my wife for a couple of years.  The seller wanted a half of million dollars to purchase it. Finally we got a breakthrough, the owner was dying decided we could do this deal.  We made a decision that we wanted to buy the property but we could not afford it.  He then subdivided the property to make it easier by reducing it to $380,000 and we still could not afford it.  He then reduced it to a quarter of a million dollars.  Even though we could not afford it, we stepped out on faith and purchased it.

The vision was to enlarge our territory by building a community center and a new edifice but knowing the great history and where we came from, we couldn’t destroy that.  It was our obligation to preserve that and bring it back to a state where we could do historical tours which is basically what we do now.

Collins:
What can one expect when visiting Jacobs Chapel AME Church today?  

Person:
Jacobs Chapel was built on the acronym of time. Our saying is to save our society one family at a time.  We are a family driven ministry.  God was so concerned about family that he gave His only begotten Son so that we could live.  Our desire is to enrich families by teaching, empowering, mentoring and informing.  We do this using different venue, one thing being our summer camp. It’s an eight week camp that we’ve been doing for about eleven years.  Children get enriched and empowered to make Godly decisions about their careers and opportunity to meet others that can help put them in places and help them to think big.  We also belong to South Jersey Food Bank, which we have a pantry that feeds over 200 people every week. We also have a program called Project Time, which is a mentoring program in school.  We train mentors from the faith-based community and nonprofits, put them in the presence of these students to help with some of the problems.  There is a lot of brokenness with our youth, even in Mt. Laurel.

Collins:
Share with us about the diversity of your congregation and the services provided.

Person:
The makeup of congregation consists of Black and White, young and old. We have some who been there since going back to the 1980’s and some that are new.  We are about a quarter of each ethnic group.

We provide several services including a pastoral care, where I counsel people and send them off to other trained counselor’s in our church and sometimes in the community if it’s beyond our expertise.

Collins:
Why do you feel collaborating with other community groups is key in contributing to Jacobs Chapel success?

Person:
No one church has it all.  We are a body and I think the church needs to wake up and understand it’s not about denominations but about one body.  We have some gifts, but what we can’t do we try to outsource it or collaborate with other people.  We only have a facility that can only hold 70 people.  So we can’t minister to everybody.  I don’t look at the church as a place to come to but as a place where we go to them.

Collins:
You are into 2012 now.  Jacobs Chapel has been a pillar in the Mt. Laurel community for more than a century.  What’s next for you?

Person:
What’s next is that we are really trying to build a new edifice.  That’s what’s at the forefront.  We’ve planted the seed for years.  We started a capital campaign about four years ago and we’ve generated about $200,000. The reality is that we need millions of dollars to do what we want.  We are trying to take our people into a new edifice debt free.  We also need another five acres of land to do what God has called us to do.  The footprint we have is not big enough to even build a 500 seat sanctuary.  We don’t just want to build a church building but we want to build a community center that can double as a church. During the week we can house children and families and on Sundays it can be used as a sanctuary.  We don’t see spending millions of dollars for a building that will just be used on Sundays.

Collins:
These are tough economic times.  You’ve launched a capital campaign 4 years ago.  How tough has it been and has anyone reached out to help you with this endeavor?

Person:
We felt the crunch of the economic times but my understanding is that God owns the hills and the cattle on it and everything else.  Even in these tough economic times, somebody is prospering.  I’m not trying to raise funds but trying to raise faith in the people by letting them know we have not because we ask not.  I’m asking people in the community to come along side of us because the vision is too great for us alone. It’s a heavy burden but a real vision because we must preserve the vision for our children of where we came from and where we are going. 

While preserving the history, what are we going to do with our community now?  Mt. Laurel is not the Lilly White town that people think it is.  When I first got here it was 30,000 people with 1800 Blacks.  Today it’s close to 50,000 people with roughly 4,000 Blacks. One of the first developments they build here was Ethel Lawrence, which is a development for low income housing.  So we now have many people coming from Camden and surrounding areas that are moving in and have special needs like everyone else. Some need financial support and other resources.  We’ve been ministering to all types of situations.  We are asking for individuals as well as corporations to join us by investing in a program that we believe works.

Collins:
Is Jacobs Chapel a historic landmark and are you receiving any government funds for it?

Person:
As we speak right know, we have not received any federal dollars.  We are in application to get on the State of New Jersey registry and the national registry.  It’s just a matter of someone making a few ink pin strokes and we could be there. We are applying this year for the trust fund and hope to get some matching money.  We are looking for people to support those initiatives as they come to pass.

Collins:
Those readers that might want to contribute to Jacobs Chapel and your capital campaign, how can they get in touch with you and where should they send contribution to?

Person:
We have a foundation called the Coleman town Jacobs Chapel Foundation.  It’s for education, preservation and restoration. We also teach the significance of our history to the youth and community abroad.  Our phone number is 856-235-7900.

Collins:
February is Black History Month.  What is the process for churches, schools, nonprofits and families to visit Jacobs Chapel AME Church for a tour of the Underground Railroad?

Person:
We do offer tours and have one coming up on February 21st for 85 students from Springville 4th grade.  The cost is $6 per student.  Teachers are free.  We teach about the Underground Railroad and bring them to the Middle Passage.  We let them know it’s not all about Black and White all of the time.  The White kids come in a little intimidated and the Black kids come in ashamed, but we try to show them there was good and evil in that mix.  Even over in Africa they were selling slaves. I just came back from there and found out that in the fourth century it was the African Kings that were selling us off to each other.  There were many who fought against the injustice of slavery; Native Americans, Whites, Blacks, Catholics and Christians.  If you lived back in that era, what side would you be on?  There was good and evil on both sides.

Collins:
How important was it to have the Underground Railroad come through Jacobs Chapel?

Person:
Oh my God, very important!  It was important to me because my family was on the line and because, many people don’t know this, but William Still was the father of the Underground Railroad.  People know of Harriett Tubman but it was William Still that hired her.  We need to get our history straight.  William Still written a book that documented many people’s history and they found out their roots because of what he had written, and he risked his life; not only that stop but all of the stops.  Jacobs Chapel was stopped number three coming from Springtown, NJ.  It came to Swedesboro, Paulsboro and Jacobs Chapel.  Then up to Burlington and New York.

Collins:
With all of the rich history of Jacobs Chapel AME Church, what happens if you goal of raising the necessary capital is not met?

Person:
If our goals are not met, the buildings that need to be preserved will not be so. The termites that were here twenty years ago when I first got here are back again.  The floor is subbing and we need desperately to raise the money because as a congregation, we can’t afford it.  It has to be a community effort.  The other thing is that if we can’t raise the money to expand we can’t use the building we purchased across the street because the township won’t allow us to get a use variance. To get it we have to spend another $70,000 which we already spent $30,000 just to get it half way up to par.  We can only use that building for office space currently. 

In order for us to grow with the community which is growing, we are still stagnant because we can only accommodate 70 people.  When we go to rent a building, which we can’t do all of the times, we get between 200 and 300 people for a service such as Easter.  Afterwards we shrink right back to our building which again only holds 70 people.  We can expand but all we can do now is to go into the community and try to make a difference with the limited resources we do have.

Collins:
What do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Person:
Even though we are in a small little hamlet in New Jersey, our history is significant to the whole world. It’s buried in the cemetery with the pre civil war heroes.  My great-great grandfather, Dr. James Still who was a man that made history and his brother William Still.  We’ve been doing tours of the Underground Railroad to the local school children, teaching them of the Middle Passage up to the abolition movement.  We certainly need to preserve that history.

I’ve been in the ministry for 30 some years and pastor of this church for over 20 years.  We are looking for support and the help to come along side.  Our track record has been proven and documented.  We are asking people to give three things, their time, their talent and their treasures. We are asking for any kind of resources because we just need help from not just the local community but the nation.

Collins:
Having the opportunity to sit with Pastor Person was very rewarding to me.  I knew somewhat of the Underground Railroad and that a familiar stop was the old Macedonia AME Church on 3rd and Spruce Streets in Camden. I also discovered stops in Lawnside, NJ and close by areas.  I had no idea that Mt. Laurel played such an important role in the development of the Underground Railroad.  We all know of Harriett Tubman but I had no idea that it was William Still that hired her.  Surprisingly, shortly after this interview with Pastor Person, I was watching a documentary of William Still that recapped this very interview.

By Chris Collins

  If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

 

Pastor Amir Khan Leads the Charge by Opening New Training School Preparing People for Work in Hospitality

Camden County Hospitality Technical Institute (CCHTI) offers opportunity to prepare for 70,000 new jobs in the restaurant and hotel industry.

Cherry Hill, NJ – With today’s troubled economy and millions of Americans out of work, people are being forced to make career changes and pay downgrades.  President Barack Obama’s national agenda with his Jobs Bill is to put Americans back to work in a timely manner.  Understanding the tough economic times we face, people are searching for additional job training that will better prepare them and make them more marketable for the workplace.

Pastor Amir Khan, a true visionary that is now stranger to entrepreneurship and service to people, has taken on an initiative to offer extensive job training with job placement assistance, by opening up the Camden County Hospitality Technical Institute (CCHTI).  In an exclusive interview with the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” he shared his outlook for the school and the opportunity for its attendees to reach success.  Joining in the interview was Brian Solomon, school administrator and Robert C. Nelson, MSW, President and CEO of Philadelphia OIC, Inc.

Collins:
Pastor Khan, tell us about CCHTI and its mission.

Khan:
CCHTI stands for the Camden County Hospitality Training Institute. When you are dealing with joblessness and unemployment with a national rate of 9% and in a place like Camden, New Jersey 20%, which we personally believe is a lot higher than that, many formerly incarcerated people do not have jobs.  We’ve partnered with Rev. Leon Sullivan’s group, Philadelphia OIC and one of his favorite sayings is, “Integration without preparation leads to frustration.” I also like your saying, “It also leads to incarceration.”  We realize that just getting a person a job, who don’t have the job readiness skills and life skills, will only lead to frustration. It ends up causing a person to go back into the streets.

Looking at the Camden County Jail in the City of Camden, that releases 50-75 people a day and an average of 20,000 people coming out of jail a year and a 73% recidivism rate, 7 out of 10 within a three year period being rearrested, 40% of those individuals are going to some form of homelessness. A lot of it has to do with jobs.

One of our strengths is dealing with the reentry population is dealing with people while they are incarcerated and when they come out of jail. Statistics will tell you that if you get a person a mentor, you will reduce recidivism by 50%. If you get a person a job, even at minimum wage, you will reduce recidivism by 50%. If you get a person a job making $10 to $12 an hour, you will reduce recidivism even more. 

We understand the importance of housing, mentoring and family reconciliation. However, jobs are extremely important to the whole part of healing recidivism.  Even if a person doesn’t have issues with a formerly incarcerated, there is a scripture that says, “Hope deferred makes the heart sick.” (Proverbs 13:12) What do you do when you come out and you are living in New Jersey, which is the most difficult state in the country? New Jersey is the highest state in the entire country for car insurance. Per capita for housing it’s the highest in the country. What happens when you have an individual coming out of jail and gets a job at a Home Depot making $10 an hour, possibly 40 hours a week, possibly $400 a week and $300 after taxes? Many have child support or other violations and fines that must be satisfied.  How do you live if you are in this region on $150 a week?  The answer is you can’t. We understand the importance of training a person for a career and not just for getting by. Letting people feel good about themselves having been trained.

Collins:
Pastor Khan, you are no stranger to Camden, New Jersey, which was once the richest city in the world and now one of the poorest.  You could be providing services anywhere. What motivates you to work hard to serve a city like Camden?

Khan:
Real good question Chris. One, we are originally from Camden in the Parkside neighborhood.  My father, Dr. Mustapha Khan, served as a medical doctor in Camden for 51 years. My mother and father came out of Howard University and set up shop in Camden and served for 51 years. My father went home to be with the Lord two years ago. At the going home service, all of the kids in the family, each one of us received a track baton. He used to run track and coached track. When that baton was passed on, it was for us to take on this mantle. My dad was the doctor for Camden High School, he was the doctor for Camden County Jail, and served in the City of Camden.  Now what you are seeing is the generations, my father, me and my son Micah carrying on the mission. My grandson, Micah, Jr. who is 14 years old, is out there helping to feed people in Camden at Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years. That gives us four generations serving Camden.  It’s our spot. That’s where we are from and we know that’s where God called us to help people. 

Yes Camden was the pride of the nation at one time. Camden was one of the top industrial cities in the country.  50,000 people employed by New York Ship Company, RCA Victor and so on.  To see it today, wow.  Yet I do believe the seeds are in the ground and it’s time for harvest.

Collins:
Who qualifies to enroll at CCHTI?

Khan:
When dealing with the hospitality industry, we are all about jobs.  We looked at the various industries of where we could get the biggest bang for our bucks and where we could get the most jobs. “The hospitality industry is number two in the State of New Jersey. Over the past two decades, New Jersey has added over 62,000 hospitality related jobs according to the Division of Hospitality and Tourism.  Hospitality related employment totaled 766,000 and was basically 24% of all private sector workers in the State of New Jersey.  It represented $44.2 billion or 11% of New Jersey’s economy,” said Brian Solomon, school administrator.

We look at what’s out there and realize there are jobs that are constantly opening in the South Jersey region. Let’s look at the Mount Laurel corridor or the old Cherry Hill Race Track area there are literally 12,000 new restaurant seats in this area over the past ten years.  All of those restaurants and hotels need servers, cooks, housekeepers and such. So we realize this is an industry where we can train people not just to get a job, but for a career.

Collins:
Brian, as the administrator of CCHTI, what type of jobs is classified as hospitality?

Brian:
Those jobs would encompass people in front desk operations, food services serving people visiting the hotels, culinary arts and housekeeping operations and maintenance.

Collins:
Pastor Khan, you’ve been known to play an important role in prisoner reentry.  Oftentimes ex-offenders are excluded from jobs in hospitality.  What is your strategy to navigate these waters to make sure ex-offenders have an equal opportunity to land a career in hospitality?

Khan:
The great thing about this industry is that those who were formerly incarcerated can go into areas that are felon friendly. This means that some companies understand that some prospects might have a blemish on their background but there are certain areas of the restaurant or hotel that these individuals can work where alcohol is not being served.  We have a list of companies that we deal with and because of our relationship and partnership with the Philadelphia OIC; we make it clear to these companies on the front in that some of these individuals have a background.  These companies understand and willing to give many a second chance.  Even as workers, many ex-offenders realize that if I blow it here, I might not get another chance.

Collins:
Are there any government incentive that makes it easier for employers to hire ex-offenders?

Khan:
Absolutely Chris. With the programs that we were able to marry together with the Department of Labor (DOL), like the “On the Job Training and Work First”, we are able to train a person for anywhere from seven to fourteen weeks.  While they are being trained, they have mentors in their life, teachers and instructors with life skills training and also individuals knocking on doors helping to get our students jobs.  These individuals share with potential employers about the character of our students, their integrity and grades. We are able to share with the employers that because of the incentive programs coming from DOL, they are able to get 100% reimbursement of the person’s salary for the first three months and 50% reimbursement for the next three months.  Because employers have incentives like these, they are willing to give individuals that have background issues a shot at employment. Employers come out on top when hiring an ex-offender as opposed to others coming through regular channels.

Collins:
Do the students at CCHTI also receive instruction in life skills and job readiness?

Khan:
Absolutely. When you are dealing with life skills, you are looking at seven to fourteen weeks.  Ask the question, why would it take seven weeks to teach a person how to clean a toilet or make a bed?  You are missing it. It’s all about teaching a person to be successful in life. 50% of the time a student spends with us is dealing with life skills.  How do I deal with conflict resolution? You are teaching them about balancing their check book; teaching the discipline of waking up in the morning and being on time. We also put a mentor in their life, not just while they are attending our program but also three months out.  We make sure that when they get paid on Friday, they are up early Monday morning to be at work.

Collins:
Upon completion of the training, what type of certifications do they receive?

Khan:
Brian will give that information, but we do a graduation and do it up big. When you see the pictures of the graduations, our students wear caps and gowns, the music is playing, they are excited to walk down the aisles to get their diplomas.  Guys that could not get a job before, have just got out of the unemployment lines and are now certified, for some this is a first. They have all made a great achievement.  They are taking pictures and sharing the moment with their families.

Brian:
Upon successfully completing any of the four courses, our graduates will receive a certification from the American Hotel and Lodging Educational Institute.  In addition to that, our culinary arts graduates will also be receiving a Serve Safety Certificate which is good for five years.  The four programs offered are; Food Services, Housekeeping Operations and Maintenance, Front Desk Operations and Culinary Arts.

Khan:
I always talk about a friend of mine whom I went to school with, Bob Sheldon. I called him, “Bobby Bird”.  He was a guy who ran track with me. After high school, he wasn’t going to college but instead he wanted to get a job with the local Holiday Inn on Route 70.  A patient of my father’s was a human resource manager at the hotel and my father was able to get Bobby Bird a job with that hotel in housekeeping.

Bob started there in housekeeping. He advanced up becoming assistant housekeeping manager and then the head of housekeeping department.  He then became Vice President of Holiday Inn and then General Manager.  He then moved out to Las Vegas to work for one of the Wynn properties.  To make a long story short, he ended up becoming the President of the Golden Nugget Casino Hotel. He then advance to the largest casino in Connecticut and also became President of the Sugar House Casino in Philadelphia, helping to open it up. Now he’s back doing it again in the Midwest. What I’m getting at is that there is a zigzag ability.  You might start at the bottom but you don’t have to stay there.  This is a true story.

Collins:
Where is the school located and how can people register?

Khan:
Our school is tied in to the campus of the Solid Rock and the ministry here.  It’s located in Cherry Hill, NJ at the intersection of Evesham and Burnt Mill Road, 99 Burnt Mill Road, directly across the street from the Echelon PATCO Speed line. Students can literally get off the train and walk right across the street to us.  Here we have a 60,000 square foot facility with 5 buildings on 6 acres of land.  We have classrooms set up for training, it’s a great environment with some of the greatest teachers in this Delaware Valley area and our person overseeing the operation has decades of experience in the hospitality industry with the track record to prove it.

Interested persons can contact the school at 856-354-2100 and start with Brian Solomon who is the leading intake administrator to give their information.  We are in partnership and work through the Camden County One Stop at 2600 Mt. Ephraim Avenue in Camden. Students will be processed through there totally free of charge.  Tuition is 100% picked up by the Department of Labor.  Students do have to qualify, but DOL will assist to help make the process accommodating.  This program is for males and females ages 18 on up.  We even had an individual that completed training at the age of 80. 

Today’s economy is changing the way people think about homelessness and joblessness rather than 20 years ago. Today our program in Philadelphia has people applying with college degrees, master degrees and such.  One individual even had a Doctorate Degree and Bob Nelson, President and CEO of Philadelphia OIC, went to that person and asked her why she was in this program. She was over qualified for other areas and wanted to try something new.

Collins:
What advantages do participants have when attending CCHTI?

Brian:
There are two distinct advantages with our training program which are; job placement assistance and we have child daycare facilities on site where parents can check up on their children if they wanted to. Once prospects receive funding from the State, they are able to take that waiver to 600 Market Street at the Camden County Board of Social Services and sit down with a case manager and get transportation to and from the program.

Collins:
Philadelphia OIC, is world renown having locations internationally.  It was founded by the late Reverend Sullivan, who has rewritten the history books. CCHTI has been fortunate to partner with Philadelphia OIC.  How important is this partnership?

Khan:
We are a strong believer in networking.  The Bible says, “Run the race that’s already set before you. Abide in the calling where you are called”. So we know our calling and our gifting.  OIC has been doing this in Philadelphia for 21 years with tremendous results and has the track record to prove it. Running graduation rates with 81% working on jobs and 82% remaining employed for a minimum of 4 months, which is twice the national average for retention. They have the reputation, history, background and there are serving the same population we serve. We didn’t want to bring somebody in that was only used to dealing in the suburbs, they operate everyday in North Philadelphia, which serves the same type of population as we do in Camden and Camden County. We understood the importance of this partnership.

Collins:
What’s next for Pastor Amir Khan?

Khan:
A lot of great things are happening.  We have our thriving church here, the hospitality training, the Children of Promise Daycare and School here which we’ve been running for 18 years now, preparing children to be the next future leaders and pouring the word of God into them. We also have just been approved for the Regis Academy Charter School, which is a free tuition based public school that is run through our organization.  It is a separate organization.

Regis is a Latin word for Kings, so it’s the school of the kings.  We start with kindergarten through fourth grade. Every year we add a grade to it, 50 students.  We are serving Cherry Hill, Voorhees, Lindenwold and Somerdale areas.  The focus of the charter school deals with technology and entrepreneurship.

Collins:
As you are aware, the Anointed News Journal has been in production for 18 years serving people in 28 states.  What do you want to say to the readers of ANJ?

Khan:
I would say to the audience that it’s extremely important to know that when looking at the name, Anointed News Journal, here you are getting anointed good news.  There is too much bad news out there.  We understand news comes across with negativity and some say that negativity sells but it’s great when you can have good news that is being put into a person’s spirit.  It’s great when your readers can hear about what other people are doing around the country and hear about what’s working.  I pray that someone else in one of the other states you serve can look at what we are doing here and contact us to collaborate with us and Bob Nelson, so that what has been done for 25 years in this area can also be duplicated in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and anywhere else you serve. We love to offer our support.

Collins:
Mr. Nelson, what is the mission of the Philadelphia OIC and how did it get started?

Nelson:
It actually started back in the early 60’s during the Civil Rights Era when cities were being burned down. Even in Philadelphia total communities were being burned down. Rev Leon H. Sullivan, Pastor of Zion Baptist Church said “There has to be a more constructive way other than destructive to deal with it.” People were angry because there were no jobs.  What he did was identified that as the source of their protest and he was able to meet with various companies in Philadelphia and say, “We want jobs.”  This opened up the doors of opportunity for jobs but only after Rev. Sullivan imposed something called, “selective boycotting.”  In the 60’s people didn’t have to give us anything but this new form of boycotting was a way to make employers listen to us.

The essence of the campaign was that 400 ministers in Philadelphia preached to their congregations saying, “Do not buy certain goods and services from these companies who refuse to give us opportunity”. What ended up happening is that over a year those same companies began to look at their bottom line and realize that they were losing money because Black folk were not buying their goods and services. They pretty much changed their views.

Although the doors of opportunity began to open grudgingly, we realized that we could not send these companies bus loads of angry people who were not qualified.  People who not only did not have the right skills, but they had the wrong attitude and no education, motivation or self esteem.

He then realized that we needed to start a training program to better prepare people holistically, including education, job training and even down to hygiene. There were people coming in off the corners that didn’t smell particularly good and we had to deal with it. This realization became the bedrock of OIC, helping people help themselves.  It was heard about in Washington, DC when we opened up our first site in North Philadelphia.  We did this at first with no money.  After the Federal Government, President Linden Johnson heard of it, he came to Philadelphia and gave it his approval. That began to create an influx of federal dollars and we began to expand throughout the country.  This included people of all races and ethnicities. There were over 100 OIC’s across the country based off of what happened in Philadelphia.

Getting back to your question about Pastor Khan, there was a gentleman Rodney Robinson, who was the treasurer of my Board of Directors.  He called me one day informing me that he was a member of Solid Rock Church and that I should meet his pastor because we were doing some similar things.  I came over and met him and through him was introduced to a series of stakeholders in New Jersey. He heard of one of our training programs which were the only one of its kind in the United States.  I then invited some of the same stakeholders over to our place and we fed them, talk to them and shared what we do.  They came away excited about our program and wanted to develop it on a more official basis. Being a 501C3, getting on the list of approved training providers in the State of New Jersey and going through about six to seven months of back and forth.  I gave them all of our curriculum and training information and in essence we used all of the Philadelphia OIC stuff and submitted it to Trenton Department of Labor for approval.  It’s been a great working relationship.  Pastor is doing a great job despite some difficulty. There are a number of hotels and restaurants in this area and there are jobs that are good for our folk; not only a job but a career that has a zigzag mobility where you can come in as a housekeeper and wind up in sales.  You can rise to the top.

Collins:
There are currently 45 OIC locations in the United States of America, 23 in South Africa, some in Poland, Great Britain and the Caribbean all started by Rev. Leon Sullivan out of Philadelphia, PA.

Pastor Amir Khan is certainly making all of the right moves and doing it intelligently. CCHTI offers a great opportunity for individuals to not only get quality training but to have a proven support system with it.  With today’s competitive job market, those who have gone the extra mile by preparing themselves with additional skills are the ones that will be rewarded at the end.  Contact Brian Solomon, intake administrator at 856-354-2100 for more information about enrollment.

By Chris Collins

   If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

Youth Group Gains International Acclaim

By, Roy L. Jones

 

With little resources to their name, and against great odds, and only their vision for starting a youth-based organization in the state’s poorest city; Robert Dickerson and his wife Wanda did what most only think about- they formed and nurtured a group from (5) members to now well over (300). After 28 years, this group has achieved international acclaim.

For those not familiar with the Unity Community Center of South Jersey, the group is based in Camden, New Jersey.  UCC is a multifaceted youth based performing arts group that includes troupes focusing on African Dance and drumming, a New Orleans style brass and instrumental band, karate demonstration team, youth step and praise ministry dance teams and an all male military styled drill team. All of these different troupes have won national and regional competitions in their respective genres.  As recently as 2010, news is that the UCC organization African Dance Troupe was selected out of 30,000 applicants to represent the United States at the World Festival of Black Arts held in Senegal West Africa.  Eighty nations sent their very best artistic groups to this World Arts Festival.  

Just recently, the UCC group was invited to perform for the national television show, America’s Got Talent, and the group has a cameo appearance in the blockbuster Hollywood Film, The Warrior, starring famed actor, Mr. Nick Nolte.

UCC’s approach to the involvement of inner-city youth in the arts and after-school education is a dynamic model for leadership development.  The group can boast that their youth do well in school, go on and graduate from college and return as mentors in the center’s programs. In fact, one of UCC’s artistic Directors, who happen to be a major force and leader at the City’s Performing Arts High School, received the highest honor as a teacher - the Milken Award and additionally, he received an Educational Grammy. Every New Governor since 1975 and State legislative leaders have officially recognized the group as a New Jersey artistic treasure.  The UCC organization is unparalleled with equally unparallel accomplishments.  

Even with such accomplishments under its belt, the organization’s attempts to expand its operations into a larger facility that will house Camden’s only Community-Based Performing Art Center, has been a slow arduous process.  The group is currently meeting with Camden’s new Mayor, Ms. Dana Redd.  Hopefully, city officials will finally invest in the city’s most important artistic treasure.

 

2012 Fund Drive Campaign  

As the year begins, UCC is seeking fund support to expand its operations and in the process serve more city youth.  All donations are tax-exempt and we ask that you contact family, friends, and businesses, political and religious leaders to support the UCC organization.  

Five Compelling reasons to Support the UCC Organization: 

If anyone should ask you why they should support the UCC organization, we offer these compelling reasons:

1. The economic impact of saving 100 youth from state prison amounts to $3,800,000. This number represents $38,000 per year for each incarcerated youth or adult. Over the course of 5 years, the impact amounts to city/state savings of $19,000,000 and of course over 10 years the savings would be $38,000,000, and that’s just the savings for 100 youth.

Therefore, UCC’s economic impact is extraordinary.

2. Further, according to the Annual KIDS Count Report for New Jersey; youth/children in the city are among the state’s worst in child well being indicators: poverty, poor academic achievement, crime, pregnancies, sexually transmitted diseases and unemployment. UCC has served over 3000 youths, successfully changed children lives evidenced through their school achievement and training programs that promotes academic excellence, leadership and excellence in the arts. UCC’s educational and social impact is equally extraordinary.

3. Though the Camden Board of Education spends well over $300 million dollars a year to educate our youth, the drop-out rate is 50%, and though past city officials supported the building of two new $5 million Boys and Girls Clubs in Camden; these new centers cannot boast of having their youth participants invited to perform on national and international stages.

4. Aside from (20) full-time jobs and (4) new commercial enterprises the new UCC facility will generate, their new facility will serve as a safe haven for youth during after school hours. A newly renovated building that’s been vacant for 17 years would improve neighborhood esthetics along the Haddon Avenue Commercial Corridor and contribute to improving one of Camden’s least developed neighborhoods: Whitman Park.

5. And not since the famed Poet, Walt Whitman, has Camden been able to boast of having an internationally famous artistic treasure to represent the city. The UCC organization is now that new internationally famous artistic treasure.  They are in fact city ambassadors.            

For all of these reasons and more, we urge people of good will to make a modest donation as soon as possible to the UCC organization.  After all, as Wanda and Robert Dickerson maintains” we should invest in and have a heart for our children, especially those that are most vulnerable.”

Donations can be made by using PayPal on their website: www.unitycommunity.com or you can call them direct at #856-365-4817. Their city address is: 1544 Mt. Ephraim Ave., Camden, NJ 08102. You may also support the group by contracting with them to perform at school/church events, festivals or weddings.

 

   If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

 

Golden Reflex Offers the Total Care Package for Relaxation

Pine Hill, NJ – Millions of people deal with the effects of stress every day.  Tough economy, high cost of education, childcare, employment issues and the list can go on. Unfortunately, many people allow the woes of this world to take them through physical changes that often lead to health complications and sometimes fatal.

Patricia Golden, President of Golden Reflex, is a professional therapist that has the perfect remedies for relaxation during times of stress.  In an exclusive interview with the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” she shares her secrets to ultimate relaxation for the hard working people that have fallen victim to the stresses of this world.

Collins:
Who is Patricia Golden?

Golden:
Patricia Golden is married to Ronald Golden, a retired detective from Camden City Police Department.  Together we have six children.  I’m an entrepreneur and business owner with Golden Reflex Massage Therapy where I’ve been in business for 13 years.

Collins:
Tell us about Golden Reflex and describe to us massage therapy.

Golden:
Massage Therapy is a therapeutic touch and a soft tissue specialist. We manually manipulate soft tissue. That means we exercise muscle by using our hands.  Some therapist use objects called knobbles to help with spasms but I like using my hands.  It is to relieve the body of tension and stress while improving nerve and blood supply.

Collins:
There are different styles of massage therapy. What determines the type of massage that an individual would need?

Golden:
Let me start off with the basic massage (Swedish Massage).  Swedish means different types of strokes.  For instance, a long stroke would be an Effleurage, a hacking is a Petrissage, a striking type is a Tapotement, etc. So when people ask for Swedish Massage, they are basically asking for the different types of strokes. We use these strokes in every kind of massage.

Lots of people come to me and say they want a Deep Tissue Massage.  Most people really want a Deep Pressure Massage.  A Deep Tissue Massage is a corrective massage.

When we do a Swedish Massage we go in the direction that the muscle is attached.  You have an origin and insertion of each muscle.  You have over 206 bones and over 600 muscles in your body. However with the Deep Tissue or Corrective Massage, we go cross-fiber to open up the fibers of the muscle to bring more blood into the tissue and also reach to the lower muscle. For instance, when you take the calf muscle, you see and feel the muscle called the Gastrocnemius. There is a muscle deep to that called the Soleus.  If I were to do deep tissue to that, I would go across the muscle, not in the length of the leg, to open up the fibers to the Gastrocnemius to get to the Soleus.  That’s a Deep Tissue Massage.

Collins:
For someone who may have had health challenges such as arthritis, paralysis, etc., how can massage therapy assist in their recovery?

Golden:
The key is to improve nerve and blood supply depending on what I find out about the person during the initial assessment.  I’m currently working with someone who has paralysis and I do a lot of deep tissue because the muscle will began to shrink because of lack of usage. If I do deep tissue and improve nerve and blood supply, that muscle would not atrophy (shrink). It will maintain as well as improve in its function.

The person that I’m working with is getting various services as well as massage, chiropractic care and physical therapy.  All three of these services have a good relationship with each other. By me manually manipulating the muscle and working at the origin and insertion of the muscle and tissue causes these muscles not to atrophy.  We are getting more movement in harmony with these other therapies. The person I am working with now is beginning to have movement and I believe it’s because of the harmony of working with the other therapies and massages.

If a person had arthritis, depending on the severity of it, again it improves nerve and blood supply.  The deep tissue breaks up any fiber grains in the tissue and that is dumped in to the blood stream which dumps it into the Lymphatic System. This improves the range of motion and flexibility of the person depending on the severity of the arthritis.

Collins:
Can therapeutic massage be utilized in assisting with weight management?

Golden:
Yes! I do a number of therapies and one is the body wrap.  I do “Spa Therapy’ or dry room techniques. These techniques include hydrotherapy, which means that I’m dealing with water. Warm or hot water along with the stroking of the massage, the heat from the body wrap as well as the products that we use on the skin, encourages the body to release the toxins out of the fat cells.  When you release toxins out of the fat cells it encourages the body to lose fat.  Heat melts the fat and again the fat is dumped into the blood stream which dumps it into the Lymphatic System. The waist is then carried through the body.

Collins:
You were a domestic engineer for many years.  13 years ago you decided to become an entrepreneur and started Golden Reflex Massage Therapy.  What motivated you to pursue a career as a therapist?

Golden:
I was an at home mom and mother of International Gymnast, Sean Golden, who was progressing in his career. When athletes compete on a professional level they get massage therapy, chiropractors and transportation to all kinds of facilities for care.  I asked myself, “What am I going to do?” Once my son reached that level and began traveling around the country and knowing he could possibly move to another state where the coaches and training facilities were, left me wondering what I was going to do. 

My son Sean was my motivation to move into massage therapy because I felt that I could help him as well as travel with him.  Up to that point my husband and I have been traveling around the United States and we were now looking at traveling outside the country following Sean.  I figured by going into this field, I could be his personal massage therapist.

However, the very first thing that motivated me was reflexology. Reflexology was introduced to me as a way of helping the body to assist itself by way of touching the feet or hands. If you had a broken bone or spasm and could not put a person on the table, you could work through their feet. Reflexology is a Chinese therapy that improves nerve and blood supply and this fascinated me. Once I did reflexology, I realized this was nice because if you had a headache or backache and actually by manually manipulating the feet, your aches will be gone. You have over 7,000 nerve endings called reflexes and this fascinated me.  Once doing this, I advanced into massage therapy. The process took me about 15 years.

Collins:
What qualifies you to provide services in the various types of therapeutic massage and reflexology?

Golden:
I attended the IIR (International Institute of Reflexology). I’ve learned the Ingham Method of Reflexology by Dwight Byers. I attended Omega Institute of Pennsauken, NJ and met the 500 hours of Massage Therapy, which is the requirement for the State of New Jersey. From there I took continuing education classes in Massage Therapy. I have various certifications for Deep Tissue. I continued and became an
aesthetician (skin care). I do facials as well. I’m currently working on Manual Lymph Drainage and I’m certified as a technician for the face and neck. I continue to educate myself so that I can become well rounded in the field.

Currently in the State of New Jersey you are only required to have 500 hours of instruction for Massage Therapy. We are now up for licensure. Licensure should be in place by December. You want to be sure to get your services by a qualified massage therapist that at least has those hours in place. The reason for the licensure is because of the bad name that massage therapy has received. With licensure there are certain guidelines under the Nursing Board that we must follow. Be sure your therapist is part of a national organization that has ethics and guidelines for them to follow.

Collins:
Oftentimes romantic couples and others might ask a family member or friend to give them a massage.  What are the hazards of giving someone a massage without being properly trained?

Golden:
First of all let me say that I am a member of the American Massage Therapy Association, and we do have ethics that we follow.  That’s key for me. It’s very important that we follow protocol that is safe and sound for the human frame.  Secondly, for safety reasons we learn not to go over any bony prominences. For example, people often ask for someone to walk on their back because it was bothering them. They feel that because it cracked their back, that it helped.  Walking on someone’s back is not safe because we have a bony frame with 206 bones. We must know that as a massage therapist we do not go over any bony prominences because there are ligaments and tendons attached to the bones that muscles are attached to causing the muscle to move. We must be very careful about that. In the back of the knee (
Prepatellar Area) there are Bursa Sacs. It is important not to go over that area. 

We learn anatomy, physiology and pathology in our studies.  We learn about diseases and a healthy body as well as how to keep the body whole and healthy. We learn that if you go over a bone, how to do it.  We also learn how to flush the body.  This is called Centripetal Movement which is heavy strokes towards the heart. These are things that most people don’t know. They just know that the massage feels good and it relieves tension and stress while improving blood supply. However, you want to know not to go over the spine and the back of the neck.  There are certain things that we learn in school and going over someone’s spine and neck without proper training is what I encourage people not to do.

There are 26 bones in your feet.  The feet can be manipulated but you don’t want to bend the foot.  Many people have broken toes and don’t know it because the bones are so small and fine. You want to be sure to have proper direction before massaging the feet.

Collins:
Why does stress seem to reside in certain parts of the body more than others?

Golden:
Because of the control that we want, we put things somewhere in our body. Most people have a lot of stress in their back or shoulders. They seem to tense up and by doing this, they hold the stress. Some people even stop breathing for a period of time. Instead of taking a deep breath, some take short breaths. When you tense up like that you constrict the muscle causing it to spasm. When the muscle becomes rock hard, we call it a hypotonic muscle. This means that muscle was in a spasm state for a long period of time. When a muscle has been in a spasm state for a long period it becomes hard to release it. If you’ve ever taken a deep breath and said, “Ahh”, and you felt so much better, it’s because you have released some of the stress and tension. That’s what the massage does; it helps to relieve the hypotonic muscle.

Collins:
How can someone contact you for services?

Golden:
I’m located at 521 Erial Road, Pine Hill, New Jersey. I’m located inside of Penick Chiropractic with Dr. Frances Penick.  We work together in harmony and I occupy space in her facility, Golden Reflex Massage Therapy. My contact information is 856-627-5550 or on the web at
www.goldenreflexmassagetherapy.com or by email at goldenreflex@yahoo.com.

Collins:
Do you accept insurance or is it a fee for service?

Golden:
I do not accept insurance at this time unless it’s flex insurance.  I do have a fee scale and offer various times for services such as 15 minute massage service, 30 minutes, 90 minutes, etc. I do workshops and speaking engagements.  I am a Christian and I do speak according to the word of God about how wholesome this is,
1Timothy 4:8 says, "Bodily exercise profited little." We talk about taking care of the body and the human frame, like drinking enough water.  I’m a CNHP (Certified Natural Health Professional); I belong to a national organization teaching people about holistic healthcare such as eating food properly, drinking properly and exercising.

Collins:
In conclusion, what do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Golden:
I thank you for reading this article and I hope that it has enlightened you. If you don’t know about massages, please call me.  I like to teach people why a massage is beneficial. There have been many studies that prove that a massage helps to relieve headaches and improve nerve and blood supply. Improving nerve and blood supply covers various things such as improving on headaches, improving range of motion, synovial fluids (for the joints like arthritis), it makes you feel better with a better frame of mind. You feel like a weight has been lifted off your body because the body now has a way of releasing itself of the toxins.  Just try it and you’ll like it.

Collins:
Patricia Golden is a remarkable person who has risen to the top of the Therapeutic Massage and Reflexology field.  Meeting with her and seeing her awards and accommodations for the industry was very impressive.  Although she shared some of her accomplishments and qualifications, there are many others that amount to more than two dozen awards. I can understand her work ethics and professionalism.  After all, she is the mother of Sean Golden, a United States Olympic Gymnast who competes at the highest level for any athlete. Some say, “The apple, don’t fall far from the tree.”

The nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” encourages you to reach out to Pat Golden and Golden Reflexology for services.  I’m sure that you will be pleased with the quality of care you will receive.  I personally know of a client who suffered from paralysis that is in her care and now making progress and taking steps to walking again. We salute Patricia Golden as our mover-and-shaker for the month. Call her at 856-627-5550 and tell her the Anointed News Journal referred you.

By Chris Collins

  If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

Golden Reflex Massage Therapy Shares the Benefits of Having Massages as Part of Your Life

From the Ancient Greek gymnasia and Roman Baths to modern days spas and health clubs massage has been recognized and voted for its health enhancing effects.

This age old hands on healing system has been used to soothe aches and pains and to facilitated the body’s own healing powers from infancy to old age massage has been found to enhance general health and well-being.

Proven Effective

Many of the therapeutic effects of massage recognized over the years have been supported by scientific research. In addition to the commonly known benefits of relaxation, improved circulation, and relief for muscle tension. New application for therapeutic massage are surfacing in areas related to mental and emotional well-being, infant care, and aging. Exciting new discoveries link touch in general, and therapeutic massage in particular, to improved immune system functioning.  

Many Benefits and Uses

Enhances General Health: Therapeutic massage can be an important component of your health maintenance or wellness plan.  It helps keep the body and mind functioning optimally.

·         Promotes well-nourished and healthy skin

·         Improves circulation of blood and lymph

·         Relaxes muscles and improves joint mobility

·         Encourages general relaxation

·         Improves immune system functioning

·         Improves energy flow

 

Alleviates Problem Conditions: Therapeutic massage can help relieve certain common physical problems, and help bring the body back to optimal functioning.

·         General muscular tension and aches

·         Tension headaches

·         Muscular back pain

·         Poor circulation

·         Stress and anxiety

 

Support Your Fitness or Sports Program: Therapeutic massage can be an important adjunct to a fitness or sports program, helping you achieve your performance goals with minimum injury and pain.

·         Relieves tried and sore muscles

·         Help improve flexibility

·         Relaxes tight muscles

·         Speeds recovery from strenuous physical exertion

·         Reduces the anxiety of athletic competition

 

Combats the Negative Effects of Aging: Therapeutic massage is effective in combating the negative effects of aging noticed in the middle to late years of life. It helps keep body tissues and basic functions in a more youthful state.

·         Enhances tissue elasticity and joint flexibility

·         Improves blood and lymph circulation

·         Promotes healthy vibrant skin

·         Improves immune system functioning

·         Relieves muscle aches and stiffness

 

Relieves the Effects of Stress: Therapeutic massage helps balance the effects of stress in our lives, and avoid stress related disease and dysfunction.

·         Triggers the Relaxation Response

·         Relaxes tense muscles

·         Reduces anxiety level

·         Normalizes blocked energy flow

·         Improves immune system functioning

·         Restores a calm mind and feeling of well-being

Special Cases: Therapeutic massage can help in certain temporary or long-term situations which cause unique physical and mental challenges.

·         For mothers- to- be during pregnancy

·         For infants, especially premature and other developmentally challenged babies

·         For the disabled, especially those in wheelchairs and others with challenging orthopedic conditions

·         For the elderly

 

Compliments other health care: Therapeutic massage is frequently used to enhance the beneficial effects of other types of health care.

·         Physical and Occupational Therapy

·         Chiropractic

·         Psychotherapy

Especially Beneficial For….

Care-giver-for those who care for others, for example: mothers and fathers, teachers, recreation leaders, daycare workers, nurses, and health care workers of all kinds.

Physical workers- for those who stress their bodies in their work or trade, for example: construction workers, domestic and custodial personnel, truck drivers, postal workers, plumbers, electricians, painters, professional athletes, dancers, and musicians.

Desk workers- for those whose work involves long hours sitting at a desk using a computer, or talking on the telephone; or at a bench assembling parts, fixing things, or creating works of art.

Travelers- for those spending ling hours sitting in an automobile, train or airplane, for example: commuters, sales people, business travelers, and vacationers.

Massage is intended for all people and of all ages. The experience of touch should be healthy, wholesome, and positive and delivered with good intent. You deserve to be de-stressed in a non-sexual environment that is relaxing, safe and clean.

 Golden Reflex Massage Therapy

521 Erial Rd.

Pine Hill, NJ 08021

Phone: 856-627-5550

 Website: Goldenreflexmassagetherapy.com

   If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

 

School of Hard Knocks
By Ernest Grice

In the community today there are not many young adult minorities who have that ultimate dream, or urge to graduate from high school and then continue on to the next level to pursue a college education to better their future. Some start off in college and then some eventually drop out, or become involved in the street life. Going to college and receiving a degree is very important in society today because without a degree it is impossible to obtain a high paying salary job.  Due to the economy today, a bachelor’s degree is now equivalent to a high school diploma. With that said it is highly recommended that we push to keep striving for high standards, and academic excellence. It does not matter how old you are in order to either start college or, go back. It is never too late to get that degree, high paying salary, or to become ultimately successful person.  College has many things to offer from the experience of meeting new people, several fields of study you can choose from, internships to gain experience in your field, and much more. Sad, but true the community has minorities who sometimes go to college come back home and never finish school, or become involved in street life activities. The street life offers to things you either end up dead or in jail. There is no room to argue that those are not the only two places you can end up. Some people adapt to the street lifestyle from standing on the corners selling a variety type of drugs, flossing jewelry, money cars, and expensive clothes. That’s all good to have the finer things in life. We all would want that and be to live comfortable, but none of that matters because once you get arrested put in prison for years, or end up dead none of that matters. It means absolutely nothing.

For us who have been in college and have already received a degree we tend to think on a higher social status compared to those without a degree, or no college experience. However, there are many people who have become successful with no degree such as Sean “ Jay-Z Carter, Sean “ Diddy” Combs who was attended Howard University but never finished, and Beyonce who just won the New York Association Of Black Journalists Journalism Award last month has no degree as well. These are exceptional few that whose talents and skills, and strong business minds got them to where they are now. As for the rest of us we need College to complete our goals. Former NBA All-Star Shaquille O’ Neal is a mentor or even role model to many young people in the world is an example of no matter how long it took he still went and got his degree. Just recently, O’ Neal graduated and received his Doctorates degree in Education. Despite playing professional basketball for several years and accomplishing many awards and recognition he still held on to his dream by getting that degree. Not only did he get his degree, but also he plans to continue on to further his college career reaching for a degree in Criminal Justice.

My name is Ernest Grice from Camden New Jersey, a sophomore at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey majoring in Communications & Broadcast Journalism. In life you are going to be told no and that you can’t do this or that many times.  Use being told no as motivation to push yourself to go harder and to become a successful person. Growing I experienced living in the Camden community that you can choose the street life or do what is right and go onto college making not only your family happy, but also yourself happy. Going to college you will have the best experience of your life. Whether you want to be a cop, teacher, doctor, news anchor, or own your own business you can do and be whatever you want to be. 

Latorshia Collins junior @ Benedict College

In my opinion, having a college education opens many doors, opposed to solely having a high school diploma or equivalent. In today’s society, High school graduates are unable to obtain high-paying jobs that were once available. The world has been renovated from a manufacturing-based economy to an economy based on knowledge. Employers are requiring a Bachelor’s degree as a minimal level of education. By attending classes and lectures, students have the opportunity to learn about their desired field from the experts, their college professors. Students have the opportunity to learn from their colleagues as well. Being surrounded by people from different ethnic backgrounds and cultures give students the ability to think outside the box as well as share opinions and viewpoints. Going to college gives you’re the opportunities career instead of just having a job. College gives you the chance to learn and nurture skills to perform in a field that you love and are interested in, instead of having a dead end job with no promotion opportunities.

 

Brian Phillips graduate from Rutgers New Brunswick

In my opinion young adults should pursue college in order to ensure and promote upward mobility. In addition to becoming educated individuals these young adults can be positive examples for the troubled youth of the city. By demonstrating the ability to make an honest living and helping others realize their purpose and goals we will all be able to help the city one day at a time.

  If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

   

UNITY, Several Nonprofits and Community Groups Collaborate to Bring Positive Change to Southern New Jersey

“Vision of Change and The Step Up Program of Pleasantville/Atlantic City Launches A national Campaign Creating Unity In Urban Communities”

Atlantic City, NJ – If you take a good look at any urban community and its youth, you will find that the common denominators are the same. Whether you reside in Atlantic City, Camden, Willingboro, Sicklerville, Philadelphia, Trenton, Brooklyn, Los Angeles, Houston, Boston or Atlanta, our young people are faced with the challenges of surviving despite the many peer pressures they endure daily.  Teen pregnancy, drugs, education, alcohol, violence and lack of positive activities are all common in every city across the nation.  In fact the challenges that young people face are nondiscriminatory, and seek to attack every youth despite their culture or educational background. Wealthy teens experience drug activities the same as teens that are raised in the urban city and in many cases have more access because they have more resources.

Nevertheless, there are many organizations that have a good message for today’s youth and are providing mentoring services to assist them as they transition into adulthood.  Recently, the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” had the opportunity to meet two powerful young women from the Pleasantville/Atlantic City area that are making an impact providing outreach to our youth. Yvette Soklove – founder of the “Step Up Program” in Pleasantville, New Jersey and Liz Castro – co-founder of, “Vision of Change” in Atlantic City, New Jersey both have nonprofit organizations that focus on youth. During an exclusive interview with the editor, they shared their outlook for joining forces to form “UNITY”, an umbrella for nonprofits and grass-roots organizations to work together.

Collins:
Ladies please tell us about whom you are and what your organizations represent.

Castro:
My name is Liz Castro. I am a full time student at the Richard Stockton College. I will be graduating in December with a Bachelors Degree in Psychology with a concentration in Forensics for Criminal Justice. I am the co-founder of “Vision of Change,” which have been active for two years in Atlantic City.  Our mission is to help our community by teaching cultural diversity and helping youth to understand each other and show them leadership skills.

Yvette T. Soklove, I am a mother, grandmother, teacher, lawyer and child advocate. I have been working with children for the past 18 years. Currently, I am teaching and have been for the past 11 years. I have a Masters in Social Work and a Jurist Doctorate degree. I have a desire to make a difference in the lives of the youth and also in the community. I have a nonprofit organization, The “STEP UP” program. The goal of the STEP UP program (which stands for Successful Teens Empowered for Purpose = Upward Program) is to help the youth make positive life choices. Our website is www.thestepupprogram.org.

Collins:
Together you ladies came together to form UNITY. What is the mission of UNITY?

Soklove:
UNITY stands for uniting our neighborhoods and investing time in our youth. It has a two-fold purpose. The first part has a goal of making a difference in the lives of our youth.  The second goal is to organize neighborhood organizations under one umbrella because together we can make a difference much bigger than we can as individuals.

Collins:
What type of organizations are a part of this collaboration and what are you looking for?

Soklove:
We have organizations, businesses, churches, mosque, youth organizations, etc. We have a network of movers-and-shakers in business that are currently at the table, the NAACP, the REPENT organization, the Atlantic City School District, the City of Atlantic City and Pleasantville, the Covenant House, Boys and Girls Club, AtlantiCare and other programs we are working with.

Collins:
Have you identified a need in the Atlantic City/Pleasantville area that has caused you to put UNITY at the forefront of your agenda?

Soklove:
We see a need in terms of the increase in violence, incarceration, teen pregnancy and the dropout rate within our community. There are a lot of organizations that are doing powerful things in the community that others are not aware of. We desire to bring them all under one umbrella because it brings them exposure and allows the people in our communities get access to services that will allow them to better their lives.

With regards to the youth, we definitely see a need because they are our future. If we don’t reach in and make a difference, it will be one of those things of invest now or pay later. 

I’m also a school teacher. Some of my students have been murdered and others are incarcerated. Because some are now adults, they are serving prison time. My personal experience in regards to what’s going on with the youth is that I feel it is an emergency for us to reach in and make a difference. With regards to the community, you cannot have one without the other. If you are having issues with the youth and the community is not unified, we are not going to make an impact.

We decided to come together and form this organization along with many collaborators because they too realize there is a need. United we stand and divided we fall. This is why we created UNITY.

Collins:
For those groups or individuals that want to be a part of the UNITY collaboration, how can they contact you?

Castro:
They can contact either Yvette or me.  My contact number is 609-705-2192 or by email at
castroo@gostockton.edu. I would also like to add that when we decided to form UNITY, it was also with the idea of bringing in the college organizations at Stockton. I think it’s important for our minorities to see there are a lot of minorities attending college. We collaborated with four different clubs that are run by African American and Latin individuals. They have come out and supported our cause. This is effective because the youth are more impacted when they interact with kids that are in college who are also minorities. This inspires our youth to succeed in the future. We make sure that the community is aware and know they are welcomed at the college. We do have the full support of our school’s president. He is proud of what we are doing.

Collins:
Running programs take resources and support. What does UNITY need in order to move forward and expand?

Castro:
For us to move forward, it will take the collaboration of more community groups. Everyone brings a certain specialty and coming together makes a huge difference. Organizations that have more experience in providing services can help smaller organizations improve in areas they are lacking. We also look to do more fundraisers.

Collins:
Are you looking for financial resources? How can someone contribute to your cause?

Soklove:
UNITY is not just a geographical organization for Atlantic City and Pleasantville. Our ultimate goal is to become a national organization and expand into different territories. We are looking for individuals that want to contribute their time and talent in terms of donating.  Yes we are looking for grant writers and business partners.  We have upcoming events including May 26th Youth Poetry Explosion with live artist musicians and singers. We are trying to raise money for our June 9th event, UNITY State of the Urban Community Part 2.  The first State of the Urban Community event was held in April 2012.  This second event will be held at the Boys and Girls Club of Atlantic City, 317 Pennsylvania Avenue, from 12pm to 4pm.

Our mission now is to have people come on board. Regardless of our individual difference, we are coming together for our youth.  We are open to everyone that is willing to donate their time.
You can reach me by telephone at 609-743-2874 or email at
ysoklove@comcast.net.

Castro:
I want to thank the Pleasantville community for their support of our past event on April 14th. We had 25 different business owners present. They donated food for the event and the gift certificates for the give-a-ways that night.  It was truly an inspiration to see how a community can come together for a cause.

Collins:
What do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Soklove:
In this day and age where we are plagued with negative statistics about our youth, it’s our responsibility to come together as community members, parents, educators, etc., and put our differences aside, whatever they might be. We must join forces to make a difference for our youth. They are truly our future.  In regards to the “Step Up program,” it is our goal to go into the schools and facilities that deal with the youth. We are a nonprofit organization and we are looking for mentors and anyone who is looking to make a difference in the lives of our youth.

Castro:
I want to welcome everyone to be a part of UNITY because it is a mission that is really needed in the community. This is something that hasn’t been done before bringing together the various entities including the faith-based community. The focus is dealing with our youth because the crime rates are very high and no matter what the race or nationality, the youth are hurting. We must show them we believe in them and show them the way to become successful leaders of our communities for the future.

Collins:
UNITY is a collaboration of many organizations. Some are 501C3 and recognize the importance of coming together for this cause.  This is a national cry for UNITY, to keep our children from self destruction. Follow them on Facebook at
http://www.facebook.com/ycrockettsoklove#!/groups/Stateoftheurbancommunity/

By Chris Collins

  If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

                                                                                                                 

 

The 12th annual hair oscars Promises a unique exhibition
of HIGH-FASHION beauty, style AND CREATIVE HAIR COUTURE

 Glitz, glamour and high-fashion hair artistry was displayed at the 12th Annual Hair Oscars presented by Universal Stylist, Inc., on Sunday, April 29, at its new location the Aloft Hotel Mount Laurel. Doors opened at 5:30 p.m. The hair show extravaganza begun promptly at 6:29 p.m.

Hosted by David Williams, singer, motivational speaker and Sensationnel Hair marketing director, this highly anticipated, cutting edge beauty industry event recognized and honored creativity in hair and make-up design.  Hair Oscars features nationally recognized celebrity guests, hairstylists, barbers, educators and make-up artists.    

“In 2012, the Hair Oscars production has been designed to showcase and exhibit the artistry and distinctive flair expected from the finest stylists in our industry. With its savvy and ultra chic decor, the Aloft Hotel was the perfect locale and backdrop to highlight the best in fashion forward, contemporary hair and make-up design,” said Tyree “Tai, The Universal Stylist” Williams-Kelly, president and chief executive officer of Hair Oscars Association.

This year, internationally known hair and fashion show producer, Glynn Jackson, also known as “The King of Hair” received the Francine Henry, I am Legend Award for 25 years of excellence in the beauty entertainment industry. Jackson is the president and chief executive officer of Washington, DC based Glynn Jackson Productions. For almost 20 years, Jackson has produced the highly acclaimed “Golden Scissors Awards.”

Additional special guests included, gospel diva and TV host Lexi, and more than 1,000 of the industry’s  most elite professionals that attended, participated and vie for best in show titles in individual live on-stage, cut and style, make-up, barber, salon presentation and student competitions. 

Established in 1998 by Francine P. Henry, CEO of Salon Marketing Systems based in Philadelphia, PA.  The purpose of the event was to educate, enlighten and enhance the beauty and wellness industry.

In 2010, after 10 years of tirelessly producing a successful event, Francine P. Henry passed the show’s production reigns to nationally known celebrity stylist Tai, The Universal Stylist, president and chief executive officer of the Hair Oscars.

 Last year, Williams-Kelly, a three time winner of the event expanded the vision of the Hair Oscars to include philanthropy, education, beauty & wellness. Now, known as the Hair Oscars Association, the organization’s expanded mission is to not only impact the beauty industry, but also aid in the fight against HIV/AIDS and Cancer by donating a portion of the event’s proceeds to support research and awareness efforts for the diseases.

 Known as one of the most dynamic, highly anticipated industry events in the Philadelphia region, Hair Oscars also included vendors featuring an array of health, beauty and wellness products and goods.  This year winners were: Javon Pinellas - Atlanta (Hairstylist Of The Year), Marcus Miller – Maryland (Makeup Artist Of The Year), Thando Kafele- New York (Natural Hairstylist Of The Year), Derek J.- Atlanta Celebrity Hairstylist Of The Year, Mane Lee Couture Salon- New Jersey Salon Of The Year, Mane Lee Couture Salon- New Jersey Salon Of The Year, Michael Letterlough Jr.- New York  Photographer Of The Year, Alisa Maria - New Jersey/ New York Fashion/Wardrobe Stylist Of The Year, Eric Dudley- New Jersey Barber of the Year, Shay "Hollywood" Lampkin Educator of the Year, Step by Step Hair Hair Publication of the Year, Hush Salon- New Jersey 1st Place Salon Presentation of the Year. For information visit: www.hairoscars.com, www.facebook.com/HairOscars or www.twitter.com/HairOscars.

 If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

Author, Radio Personality and Prophet Matthew Dare O’Dunlami Release Holy Spirit Manufactured Prayer, A Daily Devotional Guidance With The Lord  

Learn to activate Angels of the Lord by engaging in Kingdom principles through prayer.  

South Jersey – Holy Spirit manufactures prayer for us because He knows what is in the mind of God. Throughout scripture when God spoke, it was creative and always revealed something about Himself, His purpose, or His ways.  As we are fast approaching his next coming, I believe the Lord wants to reveal His plan, His place, His provisions and His purpose for our lives. But for us to get there, we must partner with Him through vigorous prayer. In the book of Acts, the Scripture told us “but we will give ourselves continually to prayer and to the ministry of the Word.” (Acts 6:4 Holy Bible)  

This devotional prayer book provides detailed, and kingdom-minded prayers which were inspired through the Holy Spirit.  Do not just pray, but pray with understanding.  How we pray can determine the urgency at which our prayers are answered.  I am sure victory is waiting for you.  

Prayer reveals the mind of God. Prayer helps to renew our mind-set. Prayer shows humility to our Creator. Prayer keeps us spiritually alert for kingdom purposes. Prayer prepares us for the second coming of our Lord Jesus.

Professionally, Matthew Dare O’Dunlami is an investment banker with over 30 years experience in the banking industry and was a former Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. He holds an MBA in finance and has worked with various banks and finance institutions across the United States.  Spiritually, Matthew has put his ear to the Almighty’s chest and heard his heartbeat since he was twelve years old and for the past 14 years he has been operating in the office of the prophet and prophetic ministry.  He is a true intercessor in the end time movement and an on-time messenger for our Lord Jesus Christ and to the nations.  He believes prophetic prayer must be aligned and confirmed with scriptures when released to the spirit realm. God’s mandate upon him is to wake up a sleeping church to walk in purity, holiness and power through vigorous prayer.

He preaches the gospel to the nations. He is also a seasoned minister of the Word of God and a member of Redeemed Christian Church of God worldwide.  He resides in New Jersey with his wife, Esther and children.  

In a recent exclusive interview with the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” Matthew Dare O’Dunlami shared his outlook for Holy Spirit Manufactured Prayer.

Collins:
Who is Prophet Matthew Dare O’Dunlami?

O’Dunlami:
I am someone who the Lord has been talking to instructing me to write a book on prayer for the children of God. According to kingdom of God and according to the will of God, the only way is to pray with scriptures.  That’s what I’ve been doing going around the country ministering the word of God and praying for people.

Collins:
At the age of twelve you had an encounter with God. What was that experience like?

O’Dunlami:
At the age of twelve I had a dream where the Lord would come to me and share some private information with me to share with people. When I would awaken in the morning I’d call my parents and tell them what I’ve experienced. This was going on for years.  My parents would instruct me not to say anything because it was a secret of people. I didn’t know what to do with the information so I kept it with me for years until I grew up. I accepted the Lord Jesus and was baptized at the age of twelve and every since I’ve been talking with the Lord personally.

Collins:
During your career in the banking industry was God speaking to you?

O’Dunlami:
Yes! He has talked with me throughout my banking career for more than 30 years. He continues to speak to me even now and it’s a privilege to hear from Him. We all have to learn how to hear and how to receive from God. He wants to talk to all of his children.

Collins:
How did communicating with God help you as a professional in business?

O’Dunlami:
My fellowship with God has helped me to be able to look at some strategies in the corporate world and to move upwards on the corporate ladder.  God gave me an outlook to see what direction the company was going in. Following Gods lead gave me an edge in management and allowed me to know the mind of the owner of the company, which made my job easier.

Collins:
Ten years ago you felt that God was leading you to write this book, “Holy Spirit Manufactured Prayer.” Share with us how you became motivated to carry out the vision.

O’Dunlami:
Ten years ago, God revealed himself to me and gave me a special book in the spirit. On the back of the book there was a little inscription saying, whoever you can help is your second person. The angel of the Lord came to me in the vision and informed me that anything I wanted in this book was there for me. If someone had cancer, headache, stomachache or any other illnesses, healing was available through this book.

I was grateful to receive this book from the angel.  The angel left me and returned two years later and handed me this book again. I took the book and saw my name in it. I said to the angel, “My name is in this book. So the writer of this book has the same name as I? The angel was shaking his head to say yes. He then informed me to use this book and tell everyone to read it.

The angel left and came back again asking me if he could borrow my book again.  I said yes.  So the angel took my book away again.  This time, he didn’t come back.  So I went to the angel and asked for my book and he made sure I really wanted the book before giving it back to me.  Once I received the book back, I woke up.

Collins:
Four years ago you began to write, Holy Spirit Manufactured Prayer.  Tell us about this book and what someone can expect to receive from it when reading it.

 O’Dunlami:
Holy Spirit Manufactured Prayer is a daily devotional prayer book, where you wake up every morning and pray according to the kingdom.  How do we pray according to the kingdom? What is the word manufactured?

We know that the Bible informs us that Jesus said, “I will send you a comforter who will tell of me.” (John 16:13-15) The Holy Spirit is all we have left as a Christian.  It tells us so many things that we need to know. When we pray, we pray according to the Holy Spirit which knows the mind of God.  Whatever is in the mind of God is available to us, so therefore we must pray according to His will.  The angels are there to listen and release into the atmosphere blessings that are for you. The Holy Spirit manufactures those prayers for us if we are praying according to his will.  That is where we get the answers to our prayers.

That’s what allowed for this book to come out and every prayer in this book is matched up with a scripture. We have over 1,000 prayer points in this book and each one is attached to a scripture. The Holy Spirit can only declare what is in the mind of God. It dwells inside of us and we need to subject our flesh to it so that whatever we release will be according to his will.  The Holy Spirit will lead us in the way we are to go and that changes our life.

Collins:
How can the public get a copy of Holy Spirit Manufactured Prayer?

O’Dunlami:
You can get a copy from our website at
www.holyspiritmanufacturedprayer.com; Email us HSmanufacturedprayer@gmail.com, Write to us PO. Box 567, Sicklerville, NJ 08081or by telephone at 856-283-8132.

 Collins:
Are you available for speaking engagements or give lectures on the book and how can someone contact you for bookings?

O’Dunlami:
Yes we do engagements and conduct church services.  We’ve done book signings and lectures all over the country.  We’ve been in Dallas, Texas and Atlanta, Georgia.  While in Atlanta for four days at the Hilton Hotel, people were buying the book and we sold out in a few days.  We had the same experiences in Brooklyn, New York and California.  We’ve had many places on our tour such as Florida, Voorhees, New Jersey and Maryland.  We minister in many places and also do conduct healing services.

Collins:
Many authors have written books on spirituality and prayer.  What makes this book unique?

O’Dunlami:
This is a unique book.  I look in many place and have not seen any like this. Some people have written books on prayer and have not included any prayers in the book. I’ve seen so many books that tell you things to do but they don’t instruct you on how to pray.  When you pray during your daily devotions, you pray according to the kingdom and there are scriptures attached to it.  While you are reading the scriptures, it makes the prayer more clear to you and more revelation will come to you as you use this book. The revelation will not stay there but it will be a window for you to enter into the realm of praying. 

This book is also unique because of the timing of when it came out. I tried to publish from January through July of 2011 and was unsuccessful in getting it out. The Lord told me on July 1, 2011 to fast and pray until this book comes out. I figured the book would come out on my birthday which is in July. I was happy thinking the book would come out in July because I’ve been working on it for four years.

I started my fast on July first and continued fasting all the way through July thirty first. The book still did not publish. I began going through spiritual warfare. August came and I continued to fast but the book still did not publish. Although there was no book, I continued to follow my instructions and fasted more. We need to hear from God when he tells us things.  When the month of September came, we finally got one of the books out for review.  However, it came back and we had to make many changes. The person who was my editor for the book became under attack spiritually and was going through many challenges.  During that time her mother with Alzheimer disease and would not take her medicine.  She called me and informed me that her mother refused to bathe for the past nine months.  As a result my editor could not concentrate on the book.  She could not take her mother anywhere because her mother smelled.

I was upset in my spirit and I prayed to the Lord saying, “Lord, I decree by the power in your name and by the power that change things. Everything that the enemy has labeled this woman with, I ask that you touch this woman…” I prayed according to the kingdom.  Two days latter this woman woke up in the morning and called her daughter and said, “I will take my shower today.” Every since then she has been taking her showers.  This is just one of many testimonies in the book.

September came and the book went but the Lord asked me to continue to fast.  Around September 30th the book was final.  The Lord instructed me to continue the fast until the launch of the book. We already had a scheduled date to launch the book which was October 8th. I fasted and prayed for 92 days and on October 8th we launched the book before 120 people at the packed hotel. October 8th,  2011 marked the 100th day of fasting and prayer.

This book is kind of different than others. God gives us instructions to do certain things. This book not only comes with instruction and the anointing and power of God.  It gives you the strength to fast and pray and when you read it you will see how he has commanded me.

 The first 50 pages get you into the book and then come the daily devotions. After the successful launch of the book, we sold almost 500 copies.  This was also a prophetic day. I later discussed with my wife at home about the Jewish holiday Yom Kippur. We talked about the significance of the number 8 prophetically.

I went before the Lord after 100 days of fasting and prayer to asked him, why 100 days fasting and prayer, He said to me, “How could I expect to write a prayer book without fasting and praying? Do you know who you are fighting? I had to equip you before you released the book.”  I did not know that the fasting was preparing me for this book.  If you would have asked me to fast for 100 days, I probably would have told you that you were crazy. Remember God did not tell me too fast for 100 days but to fast until the book came out.

Collins:
What do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

O’Dunlami:
I want to say that the word anointed means something. Christ is the anointed one. Anytime you do anything and attach the kingdom of God to it, no matter what it is, it will prosper.  Like in my book, you see “Holy Spirit” that’s God himself and LORD is Jesus Christ.  The first time I put my eyes on the Anointed News Journal, it was the Anointed that stopped me and made me talk with your representative. Seeing it connected me to the kingdom and I was drawn to it because anointed means light. Light attracts other people. Anointed is light and Christ is the light of the world and he brings people out of darkness and draws them to the light and that’s what Anointed did for me.

I believe that God has his hands on the Anointed News Journal because of a message I received about 8 years ago. I will talk about that at another time.

Collins:
Since the launch of “Holy Spirit Manufactured Prayer,” you have been successful.  How are you received by your peers?

O’Dunlami:
Good.  I thank the Almighty God for His anointing. I’m able to know many people around the country.  Many have invited me to come and minister and pray in their churches. As more people read this book, I’m getting more calls to travel and minister to people everywhere. This book can be purchased around the world and in many different countries. People have also purchased my book while traveling in the air and around the airport. I’ve also been invited to speak in overseas countries. I’ve also had celebrities purchase the book.  I’ve been featured on radio shows and other forms of media. I’m currently on the radio show on WNJC 1360AM or WNJC1360.com. This airs every Sunday night from 9:00pm to 10:00pm. The name of the radio show is “Jesus in the House”.

Collins:
“Holy Spirit Manufactured Prayer” is a great resource for daily devotion.  As I read it, I found myself going through several pages each time.  This is an easy read that will attract your interest in wanting to read further and pray.  The examples of prayers and the scriptures attached to them is rewarding and allows you to think differently as you read.

Matthew O’Dunlami is truly an inspiration to those fortunate enough to meet him and engage in conversation.  I’ve witness God’s manifestation power through him and I’m excited to know that God’s man is on the job ministering and praying for a world that is in turmoil through tough economic times.  I encourage you to reach out to him and purchase your copy of “Holy Spirit Manufactured Prayer.” You can get a copy from the website at, www.holyspiritmanufacturedprayer.com; Email us HSmanufacturedprayer@gmail.com, Write to us PO. Box 567, Sicklerville, NJ 08081or by telephone at 856-283-8132. You can also get this book in any Christian bookstores across the nations include Barnes and Nobles, Amazon etc.,

By Chris Collins

  If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

 

Regis Academy Charter School "Teaching Technology of Tomorrow to our Children Today"

The father of the cellular phone and the father of the DSL Modem partnered with Regis Academy Charter School and Sprint bringing children the best in technology.

Cherry Hill, NJ - In today’s society families are searching for the perfect place to live and raise their children.  In doing so, a key factor is searching for the perfect school to educate their children. Many schools today are dealing with limited resources and overcrowded classrooms. Some struggle with maintaining professional employees to serve as their staff. As many districts face budget cuts and as many educators enjoy their larger compensation plans, the fact of the matter is that more than 60% of the children across the nation are failing including the State of New Jersey.

An alternative to the many ills that plague the public school districts, many families are now home schooling their children or placing their children in charter schools and for those who can afford to, private schools. The traditional way of learning has its ups and downs as things have changed over the past two decades in having a quality education and in providing school safety for the children. Educators are seeking employment opportunities in urban school districts not because they are passionate but in some instances just to not have to repay their student loans.

Although this may not necessarily fit the mold in every school district, it is undisputed that parents want what is best for their children. Parents want to know their child is getting not just a quality education but the best education. How do parents choose what is best for their child in getting this educational experience? When a high school student is preparing for college, parents are intimately involved in finding the right university for their child.  In doing so they search for the best school that offers the best curriculum for whatever profession their child desires to pursue.  Why not take the same approach when searching for the best schools at any level for your child to get the best educational experience?  With this in mind the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” had the opportunity to sit with Pastor Amir Khan, one of the founders of the Regis Academy Charter School in Cherry Hill, New Jersey. Regis Academy, with the assistance of Sprint and two other technology professionals, Jessie Russell and Dr. Victor Lawrence both formerly of AT&T, offers education, entrepreneurship and technology as part of their curriculum in providing the best education for children grades K-4. In an exclusive interview, Pastor Amir Khan shared his outlook for Regis Academy Charter School.

 

Collins:
Please share with us a little about Regis Academy Charter School.

Khan:
Regis Academy is a charter school.  15 years ago in the State of New Jersey charter schools were allowed.  The purpose of a charter school is innovation and school choice. Regis is a Latin word for King. Therefore Regis Academy is a school of kings.  Each charter school has a focus. In our case our focus is leadership, entrepreneurship and technology.  We teach the same core curriculum classes as other school districts.  A charter school is a public school. You have traditional public schools and charter public schools. Our emphasis is serving children from kindergarten through 4th grade and every year after that we add a grade.

Collins:
Many of the public schools do not necessarily place a lot of emphasis on innovation and technology.  Share with us the importance of Regis Academy offering innovation and technology.

Khan:
I saw a recent report on television in September 2011, about a professor from Stanford who stated this was the first year that the incoming freshman class has never lived without the internet. All the kids know today is internet and visual age.  The same professor who was the professor of IT was saying these kids are coming in knowing more than he knows. And he’s the professor at Stanford!

Technology is huge.  We are not living in an industrialized country like it was years ago.  We have to compete globally.  I used the word, “Glocal”. You have to be both global and local. We realize that with the focus of today being technology, the importance of training a child at a young age and getting them involved in technology.

To our surprise but maybe not to your reader’s surprise, children today are already on to technology.  There was another survey done where they took some children under the age of 13 and lined them up in front of a house. They lined up some adults 30 years and above in front of another house. They asked both groups to ring the doorbell. The adults 30 years and above rang the doorbell with their index finger.  The children rang the doorbell with their thumb. All day long children are texting and using their thumbs to play video games. We are dealing with children who are already heavily involved in technology.

Collins:
The Governor of the State of New Jersey has an agenda for the “Opportunity Scholarship Act,” how exciting is it to be in position with a charter school and have the support of government?

Khan:
It’s tremendous when you have the governor of the State endorsing charter schools and the Opportunity Scholarship Act.  From the greatest school districts to the least performing school districts, if we are going to compete on a global market we need education reform. Years ago America was number one in education with math and science.  Today of the top developed countries in the entire world, we dropped down to 24 and 27 respectively in math and science. If we are going to compete we have to do so in global space. We have a Governor who sees it, recognizes it and is doing something about it.  He came into office two years ago with a mandate for education reform and we are glad to be in the forefront of that with the Governor and commissioner of the Department of Education.

Collins:
Who qualifies to attend Regis Academy Charter School?

Khan:
Again, Regis Academy is a public school, so it’s on a lottery basis. We are assigned to 4 districts which are Cherry Hill, Voorhees, Somerdale and Lawn side. That’s where our priority is and where most of our advertising is.  They have to have preference first.  However, as long as we do our preferences first within our school district, we are allowed to pull individuals from outside of our district as well.  Currently we are dealing with some students coming from outside of the district as long as long as they understand we are dealing with in district children first.

Anyone qualifies. Because we are a public school, we have a maximum of 250 students that can be enrolled at our school. Anything over that amount goes into a lottery. Again, because a charter school is a public school, there is no tuition to the parent.  It is free. The same way children go to their local public school is the same way they would come to Regis Academy.  All of the same benefits apply as well as getting picked up by the school bus.

Collins:
Regis Academy is located in Cherry Hill, New Jersey which has one of the highest performing school districts in this State.  In addition to your location, Regis Academy is the first of its kind in the State of New Jersey. Share with us about that.

Khan:
Cherry Hill and Voorhees, New Jersey are great school districts.  They are high performance districts.  Cherry Hill is the school district that I graduated from.  They have 12,000 students here in Cherry Hill. Voorhees is another high performance district.  We are the first here in Southern New Jersey as far as a charter school in a high performance district.  Again, let me get back to the purpose of charter schools, school choice and innovation.  One size does not fit all.  Even though Cherry Hill is a great school district with 12,000 students, some parents would rather have smaller classroom sizes.  Whereas Cherry Hill school district might run at 1 in 25 ratios or 1 in 30 in some cases, we are at 1 in 17 ratios.  We have an emphasis on technology and entrepreneurship. Parent involvement is very heavy.  We can do a lot with 250 students where when you are dealing with 12,000 students in a district, they can’t move the way a charter can.

Collins:
What can one expect when attending Regis Academy? What technology is being used and who are some of your collaborators?

Khan:
Today we are one of the first in the State of New Jersey to have a contract with Sprint to offer every single child a tablet (laptop computer). Every child has their own tablet with their own individual connectivity. We have PUSH notifications coming out of the tablets. It also goes to the parents. As a parent you understand what it’s like to have your child come home and tell you they have an assignment due on Friday or a test.  The parents ask, “When did you find out?” The child says, “Two weeks ago.” With PUSH notification, you are informed when the child is informed.  The majority of our books are all on the tablets.  Children learn better on tablets as opposed to textbooks. A proven fact! Today children are sight and sound.  They love touching and make learning fun.  With every child having a tablet and using it to learn, we are able to do digital assessments. Instead of waiting for once a year or a couple times a year, literally a child can excel at their own pace because it’s digital. Receiving this kind of assistance with the tablets and our digital format makes that easier.  Today most leading colleges around the country are using things like Blackboard. This is unheard of.  We are using Blackboard technology in classrooms with elementary students in kindergarten, first, second, third and fourth grade.

Our digital format and tablets that the children have is just a supplement. Obviously as a charter school, we are teaching the same core curriculum classes as they have in traditional public schools. However, we go a step further.  We have longer school days and a longer school year.  All of our children are in uniforms.

One of our key focuses of our mission here at Regis Academy is implementing the Micro-Society. Micro-Society is an outstanding way of hands on learning here at the school. In a given day, children from kindergarten through fourth grade will be doing things like writing a business plan. If the business plan crashes they have to rewrite the business plan.  They will be dealing with checkbooks and taxes.  Three times a week our auditorium turns into a marketplace environment where our kids have their own businesses.  They are buying and selling, publishing their own newspapers and buying product, supplies, publishing and selling it. They are learning about taxes and how to charge 7% taxes. Some might have an automobile shop and they are learning that I don’t pay taxes now because I am a reseller but when I do sell to the end user they have to pay 7% taxes.  When a child gets caught running down the hall, they get sent to the principal office. At Regis Academy we have our own courtroom set up where the children are the judges and lawyers who give their peer fines based on the offence. They are learning this all on a hands on basis.  In other words, they are not just sitting in a classroom looking at a teacher learning about the Boston Tea Party and taxation but they are in a real life involvement. The same goes when learning history and sciences.  One of the key things about the Micro-Society is the parental involvement.  Businesses, lawyers, doctors and other professionals are coming in to be a part of this as a community in teaching our children.

Collins:
How can parents apply to Regis Academy Charter School and is there a cutoff date?

Khan:
Actually, because we are a charter school/public school we are limited on the amount of attendance. Unlike traditional public schools who can take as many students as they want. Right now we do have openings for grades K-4 and it is a lottery after we go past our numbers. It is extremely important for interested parents to go online at
www.theregisacademy.com to download an application and get it to us right away.  There is no charge for that. Even if someone is just thinking about it they should get their application in. This way if they choose later on to withdraw they can but at least they will have their spot. Or they can call the phone number at 856-354-0600. Please note that Regis Academy Charter School is in walking distance to the PATCO High Speedline and accessible to NJ Transit Buses.  We are located at the intersection of Evesham Road and Burnt Mill Road.

Collins:
How do you choose you staff and team of professionals?

Khan:
Around here we have a couple of sayings and one of them is, “Education is paramount.” We also say that for our teachers, “Teaching is not a profession it’s a passion.” You are only as good as your staff that you are surrounding yourself with. We have an excellent administration, excellent teachers and teachers who are here not just because of a job but because of their passion. It’s a longer school day and a longer school year.  Yes we pay our teachers well but they are here because it is their calling, their assignment and passion. We are bringing in teachers who love teaching micro-society, new curriculum and being innovative. We are not just teaching for students to pass a test. We are teaching because we believe that we have the future leaders behind these desks, leaders of this country and this world.

Collins:
In conclusion, what do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Khan:
The importance of education today is what we want to emphasis here at Regis Academy. We want to make sure that parents realize, unlike the way it was 20, 30 or 40 years ago, it’s an advantage for a child to be trained up at a young age to understand business, entrepreneurship and technology. They will have that as a seed so that by the time they get to junior high, high school and college, they will have a jump and a head start in life.

One of my partners in life is a person by the name of Jessie Russell and the other gentleman is Victor Lawrence. Both of these are African American gentlemen who have made their mark in technology.  They have helped us in the very beginning with going after technology and teaching children at a young age.  Both of them worked for AT&T and they both ran the Lucent Bell Labs up in North Jersey.

Jessie Russell, my partner in business, is the father of the digital cellular phone.  He is the one who took it from the car phone to on your hip. Dr. Victor Lawrence, who is the Professor of Electrical Engineering at Charles V. Schaefer, Jr. School of Engineering, is the father of digital DSL Modems.  These are professionals coming in teaching our children not just how to program a phone but how to build whole networks and understand how they work.  Teaching children at that level by accessing our vast network of professional individuals to come in and share because they have the same vision and passion as we do. That’s teaching children at a young age to advance them into the future.

Collins:
Pastor Amir Khan is an amazing visionary that has implemented projects and programs for the entire community at large.  Regardless of status, ethnicity or religious beliefs, he has made great strides in simply helping all people.  Many of you remember his father Dr. Mustapha Khan who practiced in Camden City for many years and served the total community from the working professional to the kid that needed a physical to play little league baseball.  Pastor Amir Khan has certainly taken the baton and is finishing the race that was set before him by his father who was a great man.

With all of the controversy surrounding public schools and all of the budget cuts and professionals losing their jobs, parents are searching for better alternatives to educate their children. The United States government supports the mission of charter schools.  In the State of New Jersey, Governor Christie has the (OSA) Opportunity Scholarship Act, which puts the resources behind the child and allows the child to go to a school that offers them the best education.  It does not make a parent send their child to a certain school just because they live in that particular neighborhood or district.

The nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” salutes Pastor Amir Khan and the Regis Academy Charter School for opening the door of opportunity for children not only to learn and compete academically but also to advance in technology and entrepreneurship today as they become the future leaders of tomorrow. We encourage those of you who are searching for better educational opportunities for your children to contact Regis Academy Charter School for enrollment.  Time is running out and space is limited but the reward at the end is phenomenal.

By Chris Collins

   If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

Pastor B. Purnell and Alicia Wright Celebrates Ordination with the Launch of Victory in Praise Ministries Inside Echelon Mall

“Meeting people right where they are”

Voorhees, NJ – In today’s society people are utilizing unorthodox methods to accomplish goals of improvement and winning souls for Christ.  From gospel music with a contemporary or R&B sound to being dressed in urban attire during a church service, the traditional ways of worship have become overshadowed.  Some are used to having services in the sanctuary, the YMCA and even the home. Yet, the very thought of going to church at your area shopping mall is farfetched to many.  In the past decade more churches have been occupying space at strip malls and even taking over expo centers. Victory in Praise Ministries has now taken that a step further by launching a celebration of ordination at their new location inside of the popular Echelon Mall in Voorhees, NJ.

Elder B. Purnell Wright started his journey while serving as a youth minister at Bethany Baptist Church under the leadership of Bishop David G. Evans. Victory in Praise Ministries was started by Elder Wright at the Jacobs Chapel AME Church in Mt. Laurel, New Jersey.  Since that time the ministry has held services at the Moorestown Community House in Moorestown, New Jersey, The CLC Christian Book Store in Moorestown, New Jersey, A quarterly youth ministry in Conway, South Carolina, A marriage ministry at Calvary Fellowship Church of North Philadelphia and currently at a 1000 square foot facility located inside of the Echelon Mall in Voorhees, New Jersey.

Although Elder B. Purnell Wright is no stranger to the faith market or to thousands of young people throughout Southern New Jersey and Philadelphia, it was just recently that hundreds of people witnessed the celebration of his ordination as Elder.

On May 20, 2012 at the Calvary Fellowship Church of North Philadelphia, B. Purnell Wright was ordained to the office of Elder.  Under the direction of Pastor Nathaniel B. Jamison, several pastors came together to assist and charge Purnell Wright to perform the work of the Christian ministry. Reverend Chris Collins, editor-in-chief and CEO of the nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper, “The Anointed News Journal” served as the master of ceremonies for the ordination. Others participating were Elder Larry Arrington who offered a hymn, Pastor Curtis Haynes who gave the invocation prayer, Pastor Donshae Joyner who read the responsive reading, Tamara Haskins who ministered through song, Pastor Christopher Bell who read the Old Testament scripture, Pastor Damion Caldwell who read the New Testament scripture, Carly Haynes and Ashley Lovelace who ministered through dance, Minister Kenneth White who offered a sermonic selection, Bishop Harry W. Pendleton who gave the proclamation of the Word, Bishop Dennis Green who offered the investiture and presentations, and final remarks by Elder B. Purnell Wright himself.

The ordination was long overdue as Elder Wright has ministered to thousands of young people as well as preached at many churches from New York to Orlando, Florida.  Not only ministering to the needs of people spiritually but also through his expertise as a professional in business.  He is a graduate of Stockton College with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Marketing. Currently he serves as a Financial Services Professional at Prudential Insurance Company in the area of Life, Health, Property and Casualty Insurance. He serves as a credit consultant and hosts a series of workshops dealing with finance, stewardship, credit, budgeting and applying Biblical principles to your finances.

This past weekend was the first official celebration honoring Elder Purnell Wright and his accomplishments.  Several clergymen and parishioners congregated at the Echelon Mall Ministry, where Victory in Praise Ministries hosts their weekly services every Saturday from 11:00am to 1:00pm. The Echelon Mall is located at the intersection of Burnt Mill Road and Somerdale Avenue in Voorhees, New Jersey.  The ministry is easily accessible to the PATCO High Speedline and NJ Transit bus routes. If you are ever in the mall shopping on a Saturday afternoon, stop in to celebrate with the Victory in Praise Ministries.  Tell Elder B. Purnell Wright that the Anointed News Journal sent you.  For more information on Victory in Praise Ministries contact Elder B. Purnell Wright at 856-207-6610 or by email at purnellwright@lwres.com.

By Chris Collins

    If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

 

Overcoming Incest and Moving Mountains

Tracey Fluellen shares life’s experiences to offer help to those battling with incest.

Camden, NJ – It’s no secret that in society we battle with many ills that go unaddressed by family, community, religious institutions and our leadership at large. Whether we mention drugs, abuse, theft, domestic violence, incarceration, rape or incest, the fact is that many families have to struggle with ways to overcome the challenges of a loved one falling victim to such conduct.  Leaders of the family, church and community oftentimes keep quiet about certain plagues when individual victims suffer and get treated as misfits, criminals, home-breakers and outcast. Not only are these illnesses popular in the African American community but some cultures embrace these behaviors more than others; yet it affects us all.

The editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal,” had the opportunity to exclusively interview Ms. Tracey Fluellen, a survivor of incest since the age of three.  Ms. Fluellen is a powerful young woman from Camden City that has led the charge on educating not only victims but communities across the nation on the effects of incest and the road to recovery. Ms. Fluellen shared her candid expressions with the editor and you the readers.

Collin:
Who is Tracey Fluellen?

Fluellen:
Tracey Fluellen is an incest survivor, a local poet and an advocate on behalf of voices that don’t have the courage to speak out on what was done to them. I’m a native of the City of Philadelphia, PA.

Collin:
What is your mission?

Fluellen:
My mission is to bring awareness to incest through poetry, spoken word and my testimony.  It is to let people know that incest is a serious issue in the Black community and all communities. We need to find solutions to make a pathway for people to speak out loud and be able to get healing and recover from it.

Collins:
What qualifies you to speak out on this topic? What are some of the challenges in your life that has prepared you for such a mission?

Fluellen:
What qualifies me is that I was a childhood victim of rape by family members.  I was raped at the age of three, yet discovered after therapy that I was violated before that. Throughout my entire childhood, my family members, cousins and their friends violated me. By the age of twelve I met my biological father and by the age of sixteen I had a baby by him. When that child was four months, he was raped and given a sexually transmitted disease. When my child turned three, he was electrocuted in my aunt’s bathtub. Eight months after that, my mother was brutally murdered and thrown in a closet. As a result, I think my whole testimony qualifies me to speak out on incest and the things that come along with it.  I was pregnant numerous times by my biological father and had many abortions.  I was raped by many people. People knew about it, took money for it and continued to turn their heads and go about their business. They acted like because I was not their child, it was not important.

Addiction is also a part of incest that brings in some sinister acts that causes it to continue.  I had a long going relationship with my father that I am at peace with today. No one can hold that against me because I understand what he did and why he did it. Yet the people around me that knew what he was doing allowed it to continue.  Therefore, if anyone is responsible for what happened to me, they too can fall into that category.

Collins:
As I listen to you talk about these incidents, it amazes me that you are able to stand and speak of it.  How is it that you could go through so much and be who you are today?

Fluellen:
That is a good question. One, God! Two, the acts that were done to me were by evil, wicked individuals who are not of God. The only place I had to go and the only choice I had was God and I chose Him. To God be the glory! He guided me and gave me strength and showed me that I was not like them. God is wonderful! If it was not for God I would not be able to want to be conscious enough in His sight to go forth and say the things that I say.  As I go forth, there are all kinds of persecution, sticks and stones that are thrown at me although I was a victim.  It’s God’s grace and mercy that allows me to stand and he keep my feet on a mighty rock.

Collins:
How do you feel the community perceives you when they learn of your story?

Fluellen:
It’s been my feeling that the community is quite pleased in what I am doing and they respect what I am saying. They look at me in awe and amazement that I have the ability to stand whether it is in a poetry setting or some kind of domestic violence gathering. Many people are going through the same thing and want to say what I am saying but are afraid to speak out on it. Some get caught up in it and do not know how to break away from it. Outside of the church, the public really embraces me.

Collins:
How do you feel the community perceives you when they learn of your story?

Fluellen:
The church looks at me from the perspective that there is no room for my testimony. They look at me from the perspective that if I come and share my testimony, once I leave, they have to clean my mess up.  This is real personal right now. The church claims that God heals all things but yet my testimony is not worthy enough to come into the church so that God can heal someone of that pain. So I’m actually limited in the church. The majority of the churches in Camden don’t want me around, they don’t answer my phone calls, they talk about me and treat me like dirt but yet they say, “Hallelujah, thank you Jesus.”

Collins:
Do they treat you like this because church folk do no wrong?

Fluellen:
Oh well, we know they do no wrong. Hey, elaborate on that one.

Collins:
You mentioned that it’s only by the grace of God that you are able to do what you do. God also gave you a vision with this. Talk to us about your vision.

Fluellen:
My vision was to start a nonprofit organization called, “Voices and Visions.” We established this on behalf of those that need to be healed and recovered from incest. It’s currently in its infantry stages.  It is designed to offer counseling and training for groups and individuals. We offer housing and outreach to those in need.

I’ve just started Gloucester Community College this semester.  My intention is to go to school for ten years and pursue a doctorate degree in psychology. I want to have a specialized degree in sexual assault for men, women and children.  I not only want to give a testimony of my life story but I want to give an educated testimony from a clinical perspective. I want to get on the witness stand and get into the mindset and the core of that demon, person, individual, that male or female that set out to execute this kind of assault on a man, woman or child.

I’m a mother of a son who was from my biological father; a son, who was raped at four months by a man who enjoyed having sex with boys. He took the opportunity to rape my son while I left him in the care of someone else while I was in school. He also gave my son a disease as a result. That gentleman is dead. He was shot in Philadelphia under the 25th Street Bridge. I say thank you!

My point is that I want to get into the minds of that person. I want people to have a tangible place they can come to that is not hidden or a secret. Most incest survival groups are closed doors and you have to go through this group and that group only to find that at the end your phone calls don’t get answered. I’m not here to hide or cover up anything.  I want the door to be open and with a sign that people will know who we are and the services we provide.

Collins:
When you look at a place such as Camden, Philadelphia, Chicago, Chester, New York City and other hard core places that are known for violence, drugs, prostitution, etc., what do you see?  Is there a solution?

Fluellen:
Good question. This is exactly what I see. With the addiction come the sneak attacks of family members violating daughters and female members of the family. In the community I see a game being played with the drugs to sexually assault people.  It’s all about sex. It really is.  I see the church not intervening but have members within their congregations with known backgrounds and history but the leadership of the church will disregard it and not acknowledge it and focus on recovery.  If you don’t get to the core of something, you can never be completely healed.  There’s a term called, “clusters, blockers, etc.” You have to get to the actual problem. If you have people coming to your church that are victims of assault, rape, incest, abuse, etc., and if the church is violating them and the drug dealers are violating them, there is no room for real healing and recovery because no one is taking the issue at large serious. The drug boys are going to be there and expected to act a certain way but if God heals all things, it is my personal opinion that the community and the church must join forces and get serious about these sick issues plaguing our people.

Collins:
What are the core issues?

Fluellen:
For me the core issue is that the church and the community at large is not acknowledging and addressing the issue of family rape. People have four and five babies by mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles and cousins. Mothers and fathers are bringing their children into the bedroom while everybody talks about it but do nothing about it.  Society will acknowledge you beating me up and domestic violence relationship before they will ever conceive me having sex with my brother and having five children.

Collins:
What do you want to say to the faith-based community; both those in leadership and those in the pews?

Fluellen:
God heals all things but you are not willing to bring to the altar, the front door, the dining room table or to your marches for causes of drugs and prostitution, the message of incest.  Bring it openly so that people can be healed. I am an incest survivor that has gotten stones and books thrown at me by the church and community. Put your faith where your mouth is. I don’t think that selling CD’s and M&M’s after service is as important than having a soul amongst you that has gone through something as devastating as incest and you refuse to give them a voice. I think it’s an injustice and collectively, we as women must hold hands and stand up and bring this before God and allow the true healing to begin.  I’m asking the church to allow these people to come in and give their testimonies in the midst of the congregations and let these people truly for the first time in their lives really become healed. We are all accountable! We need to prioritize and allow these victims to come to church and not have doors slammed in their face. God works through all people.

Collins:
You often express yourself through poetry as well as hosting workshops and lectures.  How can the public contact you for speaking engagements?

Fluellen:
I can be contacted several ways. I can be reached through the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, the “Anointed News Journal.” Please call Mr. Collins at 856-904-9429. My personal cell number is 856-655-8162 or by contacting Rev. Tony Evans at Tenth Street Baptist Church, where I am a member.  His number is 609-744-9227. I am willing to come and share my testimony through poetry and the arts. I realize this journey is much bigger than me. I want people to understand you can be healed.

Collins:
What’s next for Tracey Fluellen?

Fluellen:
I’ve recently enrolled in Gloucester Community College. I have eight to ten years of studying in front of me. I look to become an author, writing books on healing from this sickness and poetry. I want to be able to give a clinical explanation as to what makes people participate in these types of behaviors. There are voices who no one will ever know their names.  I am starting a foundation called, “Voices and Visions.”  This vision came from me receiving direction from God and hearing His voice and receiving His vision. Although I know people thought I was crazy, I followed the vision of God. The voices I would hear were not only mine but also those people who died from murder, rape, violence, etc. who could no longer speak for themselves but God allows me to speak out for them, too. “Visions” is the dream of wanting to be free.  The freedom you dream about when you are a victim.

Collins:
Have you made any appearances anywhere sharing your testimony?

Fluellen:
My most recent was at the book store in Trenton, NJ.  I was also interviewed by the Trentonian Newspaper. Prior to that I appeared at a few churches in Camden, the Domestic Violence Center in Camden County, Walt Whitman Center in Camden, the O.E.O. Center in Camden, and in 2005 I helped to organize a celebration called, “A Night of Healing, A Vision of Tracey Fluellen.”

This was such a wonderful event that it was standing room only at the Walt Whitman Center, downtown Camden. People started arriving at 5:00pm for the 6:00pm start. It is the goal to take this around the country to each organization that is working hard to assist with the healing process for victims. We want to celebrate those who are and will overcome.

Collins:
What do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Fluellen:
I ask that you don’t just see Tracey Fluellen but see the many people that have been violated by family members from infants to senior citizens. Please honor them by setting up some type of group sessions in the church or community where people can be embraced and hugged. I ask that you look at those individuals who smoke crack and use drugs differently. Go into your homes and have discussions and conversations with your children. Tell your family members that you love them. I’m asking that you say a prayer for me that God will continue to give me the strength to continue to go on and do what I do. I ask that you please remember the cause and that the church doors remain and become open.  If we can do these simple things it will make a difference.

Collins:
Tracey Fluellen is a remarkable woman that is mission driven and conquering ground with a huge impact. It’s amazing that I connected with her immediately and opened my avenues of communications to assist her in getting her message out.  The son she speaks of was a former student of mine whom I took under my wing a few years ago. This young man not only strives to be successful in life but also served this country as a soldier in the US Army Reserves. Not thinking that I would meet his mother years later on an unrelated matter, but only realizing the power of God and how he allows us to be connected at the appointed time.

I encourage you the readers of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners and over comers, “The Anointed News Journal”, to reach out to Ms. Fluellen to speak to people who are afraid to talk about these issues.  You can also look to upcoming issues of the Anointed News Journal to follow up with Ms. Fluellen who will offer a monthly column sharing her poetry and outlook.

We all know of someone who has been affected by incest.  We may not think of it as being so serious but in reality it is.  I cannot imagine what goes on in the mind of an individual that has been victimized. I cannot imagine what goes on in the mind of someone who thinks it’s alright to participate in this behavior even if the other person seems to be ok with it.  However, I do know it happens often and I know several families personally that has been affected by it. Incest is not only happening in the African American community but in every culture, some as a common practice and tradition. Often the predator is treated with respect and the victims are treated as outcast. Possibly I’m guilty for not exposing these sicknesses sooner but thank God for people like Ms. Fluellen that have the courage to step out on faith and be a voice for the voiceless, even when she has to do it all by herself.

In the past the Anointed News Journal has supported many causes for domestic abuse, violence, employment and such. Many readers have contacted me personally to ask for more.  I encourage you to write in with your questions so that we can help. You can be confidential and do not have to give your information. Ms. Fluellen would like to address your questions and offer resources that can began the healing process.  For myself being a man of faith and a member of the clergy, I can offer words of encouragement and guidance but to have access to someone who lived it and can talk about it is powerful and can offer a greater impact. Write to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, NJ 08101 or by email at anjeditor@verizon.net.

By Chris Collins

   If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

 

Beverly Collins-Roberts, Historian, Curator, Photographer and Educator Shares “The Journey” A Documentary Tracing the African Slave Trade from Ghana, West Africa to Camden, NJ

Camden, NJ – The Journey, equates its writer, director and producer, Beverly Collins-Roberts, to an orphaned child living in America, who discovers in 2002 the history of slavery and plantations in her own backyard of Camden, NJ. The film is about her journey of discovery, revelation and awakening.

In 2008 Ms. Collins-Roberts followed the direct link from her beloved city of Camden, NJ back to where it all began in Ghana, West Africa.  There she was able to continue her research as she photographed, filmed and interviewed the people opening up in a dialogue which she hopes to bridge the gap or “disconnect” between African Americans and their African Ancestral family they are now strangers to. The interview tells what slavery looked like from their perspective and how they came to view “their relatives” taken captive – who never came back.

The Journey juxtaposes the lives of captive Africans, now African Americans, and how life evolved for them in not only Camden, NJ; but America.  The Journey takes its views through some of what was happening during specific time periods to each people on the two continents and allows audiences to witness the similarities and the differences and to embrace the wholeness of their experiences.

Like that orphaned child, Collins-Roberts is filled with a whirlwind of emotions from the time she boards the plane to cross the great expanse alone.  She feels anxious and thinks, “What if they don’t like me? What if we don’t understand each other? Why didn’t they try to come and save us?” These thoughts plagued her mind as she wept for those who died during the Middle Passage.

During an exclusive interview with the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, the Anointed News Journal, Beverly Collins-Roberts shared her experience and discoveries.

Collins:
Who is Beverly Collins-Roberts?

Beverly:
She is many people. I started photography in 1979 and started documenting my city. Unknowingly, this would turn out to be a documentary some 30 years later but it was something I wanted to do. Photographing the children and places was rewarding. The film making came about in 1995 when I was doing films about children and for children.  The historian part came about in 2002 when I discovered that Camden was a slave port. I began doing research for three years and one thing led to another as my research lasted for eight years.  I guess I’m all of that and a mother of three children and a wife.

Collins:
Recently, you debut the documentary, “The Journey.” What motivated you to do this and what was the overall mission of this project?

Beverly:
This documentary was actually the second.  I did a mini documentary in 2005 and won a contest for Scribe Video, where they were doing the histories of communities.  That was actually the first time that I showed or talked about slavery in Camden.  This was taking place in the slave quarters at the Camden County Historical Society in the Pomona Hall.  That area used to be a plantation. Later on I had an opportunity to go to Ghana.  This was the last stages of my research. I was telling the story of the whole entire journey which extends back to four hundred to five hundred years.  When I did go to Ghana, I was stepping on that ground for all of the people who never got to return home and for the millions and millions of our ancestors.  When I first found out about the slavery in Camden, I had no idea any of this would happen. I didn’t know where I was going to take this opportunity or what I would do with it.  One thing led to another and I finally debut the film in November at the Gordon Theater at Rutgers University, Camden.  It’s now completed and on DVD as of December 2010.

Collins:
Many people think of the slave trade having ties to the southern states.  What did your discoveries tell you about the shores of Camden, NJ?

Beverly:
Basically that Camden was a very lucrative slave port.  This was something that no one in Camden knew.  Not the mayor or city council or the people of Camden.  It’s not that the history of Camden was blatantly left out but if you don’t know your history, you will never find out what it involves.  I kind of stumbled upon it but then again maybe it was my destiny.  I was told by the museum director, as I was there in the exhibit doing some work as a photographer that the Historical Society used to be a plantation. From that moment on everything began to peel back like an onion and ended up being a film called, “The Journey.”

Collins:
Where is the Camden County Historical Society and Pomona Hall?

Beverly:
It is located at the intersection of Park Blvd and Euclid Avenue.  It is the small house looking facility where the Camden High School Athletic Field is located.  Pomona Hall is the original name of it when it was built back in 1728 possibly and the Camden County Historical Society took it over and restored it.  Through all of the papers found, the Historical Society discovered that it used to be a plantation.  This building was called the Big House. At the time it was called this, it sat on a plantation that was 412 acres.  It was very sizable and owned by the very prominent family, The Coopers.

If you do not know anything about your history, you wouldn’t know that the Cooper Family was slave owners.  They were Quakers. Most people think that Quakers were not slave owners but it wasn’t until the last 60 years of slavery that the Quakers tried to help us to escape from slavery.  However, prior to that they were very prominent slave holders that came over from England.

Collins:
There are many prominent names of families in Camden that we see when passing through the Harleigh Cemetery and also as we see some of the street signs. Names like Baird and Kaighn. Were there other families that were slave holders too?

Beverly:
Absolutely. I didn’t find much documentation on most families but there was another prominent family in North Camden where Petty Island is.  Petty Island in Camden is where they would bring Africans who became slaves and hold them until they would go around the Delaware River to where Wiggins Waterfront Park is now. There they would sell the slaves on the auction block. I know this for sure.

At first I would say that this person or that person, were slave owners but then I began to realize that it was the business of America at that time and who wasn’t.  If you had money you purchased slaves because it was the American way.  During that time slavery had nothing to do with racism but purely economics.  Once they set us free, then it went into racism which became another way for them to hold on to us in poverty, which is still happening to us today.

Collins:
Were there certain neighborhoods in Camden that slavery was more popular than other neighborhoods?

Beverly:
Definitely downtown Camden and along the waterways because that’s where the Africans came in to this area.  After the slave trade, there were certain areas where African Americans in Camden were pushed to like the section where the Macedonia Church is and over to Kaighn Avenue.  That section was called Kaighntown.  It wasn’t until the industry began to move out of Camden that we began to expand to other areas.  One person would get into Parkside on a block and before you knew it, those residents living there began moving out. The White folk were moving anyway because the industry left and so were they. 

Camden was left with no industry and no money.  People could only get menial jobs. It used to be a time where everyone worked at Campbell’s Soup Company, Guardio Brothers, RCA to a degree because RCA didn’t think that Blacks were smart enough therefore just a few of us made it to work on their assembly line.  But that’s when Camden began to go into poverty and became a welfare city.

Collins:
How long did you spend in Ghana, West Africa and what was it like?

Beverly:
Prior to going to Africa, people would say to me that once I stepped on the land I would feel like I was home.  I actually did not feel as if I were home but I did have the feeling that I was returning home for all of the hundred millions of us who never got to return home. Some think there was only three or four million Africans that were taken captive but there were many more.  I purposely went there not to sight see but to photograph and film the people and the slave castles.  I wanted to have a dialogue with the people there because I realize there is a disconnection between Africans and African Americans here.  We know that we came from there and they are our brothers and sisters but we really have no real connection with the Africans and they have no real connection with us.

I ended up living with them in their natural homeland and in the compound right there with the people. I was glad to do this because my interviews were very natural.  I found out we have a lot in common as well as many differences because we are raised differently and copying after White America because that was our teacher. The master was our teacher. Yet in Africa the similarities were that they had the British.  Even though they had their land and customs, they were still British ruled.  Ghana did not become independent until 1957 which was around the same time many African Americans were fighting for their freedom during the Civil Rights Movement.

Collins:
Through your interaction with the Africans, was there a hope that they wish for concerning African Americans here in the United States?

Beverly:
I found that the hope was long and they dreamed to come to America due to their economic situation.  They actually thought I was rich because I had gifts for them.  It’s custom that when you go to Africa you bring gifts.  Although the gifts were small, it seemed as if I had so much.  The Africans think that all of us here in America are rich.  I made some wonderful friendships and some will last a life time. Even though the people there were nice and warm, you could definitely feel the difference between us.  That thing that all of those hundreds of years have done in separating us almost like a child being separated from its mother, once you become reunited it’s great but there is no connection.

Collins:
There is a familiar photo of the “Door Of No Return.” Were you able to go to that location and what was the feeling like?

Beverly:
I filmed and photographed while hosting interviews at the Cape Coast Castle. I was there from 9:00am until 4:45pm and the whole day was indescribable. I just had to be removed from it in order to be able to do my work.  Prior to that I heard how so many people had broken down when they visit that location. There is such an eeriness and stench or smell present and we are talking about since the 1600’s. Yes, I did see the door and I have photos of everything but the shackles. I didn’t want to see them. I went into the men’s dungeon where the stairs kept twining and going deeper and deeper.  There were all of these little rooms with three little tiny windows that provided the only light in there. The windows were about forty feet high and also provided the only air in there too. Imagine hundreds of thousands of us died in there without even getting on a boat. When you go through the door of no return, it’s very saddening to think that whole populations of people never got to return home and know nothing of their home.

The difference between us and them is that we were stripped of everything: our religion, language, children separated from parents, husbands separated from their wives and everything that tells a person who they are was totally taken from us.  There is no comparison when people say that slavery has happened in other places.  I’m sure it has but I think not on the history of the world that anything so severely done that it still affects us five hundred years later and people still are trying to get rid of that slave mentality just to begin to get a sense of who we are. Even though I’m aware of all of that and I felt all of that, I didn’t want the film to just leave you there but it had to end with hope.  You can feel hope all through the film.

Collins:
How can people get a copy of the documentary and what messages do you want them to get when they view it?

Beverly:
My website, www.bevcr.com is available for people to place orders for the documentary.  The documentary has a whole lot more information in it.  Not just about Camden or Africa but the things that happened between like Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Dubois and others. We quickly moved through it like a journey.  The slavery part was just to inform us so we would know our history but there has to be a sense of hope for all humanity that this will never happen again in this lifetime.  If you know your history you can share it with your children and grand children. I hope that whichever way this film touches people they feel there is hope for all humanity no matter what.

Collins:
What’s next and where do you go from here?

Beverly:
Basically, I need to slow my life down because the documentary took eight years of my life and really took a toll on me. Before I get into the screenings I need to recuperate. When you do something in life of this magnitude, it does something to you. But I hope to get the film screened in many theaters across America.  For the next year I just look to have the film screened in different places in the area and it will be Q & A.  The screenings do not have to be at a large place but I’m even willing to do it at a family home. This is not just for Black folk but for all people, whoever can get something from it that will help to enrich their lives.  White people need to know the truth as well.  Whether they except it or not is their business.  I look at other culture history such as the Jews and Japanese. Its history and we are all living in the community together so it’s good to know.

Collins:
What do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Beverly:
First of all I am very appreciative for this interview and I hope that something you’ve heard touch your life in some kind of way.  I’m very proud of the Anointed News Journal. It has been out for quite some time and does an exceptional job with its wonderful articles and I feel very privileged to be part of the community of the paper.

Again, if anyone is interested in having a screening, just go to the website, www.bevcr.com and leave your contact information and someone will call and get back to you. On October 27, 2011 I will be at the Camden Library located at 9th & Ferry Avenue.  This is my old neighborhood where I grew up and I really would like for the people of that neighborhood to come out. The time will be from 5:30pm to 8:00pm.

Collins:
Beverly Collins-Roberts is a remarkable woman that has done what many African American desire to do, visit the mother land of Africa.  Many people travel for tourism and sightseeing but Beverly went with a purpose in mind.  She’s taken her experience and shares them with people far and wide to educate us and remind us of our heritage with documentation to back it up.  During her debut at Rutgers University Camden, it was a standing room only inside of the Gordon Theater that seats over 600 people.  The audience concluded by rendering to her a standing ovation. 

I encourage you the reader to contact Beverly Collins-Roberts for a viewing at your location of choice, your place of business, worship or even residence. There’s no place to large or too small. Many young African American adults do not necessarily show interest in culture and heritage. Here is a great opportunity to host a session that will bridge the gap and educate them on their heritage and local history.  I cannot imagine the time or resources it took for Beverly to take on such a challenge for the people of not just Camden, NJ but African Americans at large as well as those who are interested in our journey to this land.  I’m sure the course of events, were something that has changed her life forever.  The nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal”, salutes Beverly Collins-Roberts as our mover and shaker for the month. Feel free to respond.

By Chris Collins

  If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

 

Author Dawn M. Bunch Releases Second Book, “Women of Timelessness”, A New Awakening of the Mind, Body and Soul Dialogue

New Castle County, DE – Dawn M. Bunch is a well-rounded woman that has made her impact to society in sports, entertainment, business and journalism. A former professional tennis player, a golfer, former professional Ebony Fashion Fair model, a business contractor and author of her sophomore book, “Women of Timelessness”. Most importantly, Dawn Bunch is a wife and mother who enjoy family. 

Being a woman with a diverse background, having many experiences, she began writing books to share with readers and empowering them to prepare for the next level. “Ain’t Life Grand,” was the first release that she toured with giving lectures and making appearances throughout the Delaware Valley. Now she is ready to do it all over again with her new release.

During an exclusive interview with the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal,” Dawn shared her outlook on the new release. 

Collins:
Who is Dawn Bunch?

Dawn:
I am born and raised in Camden, NJ and a true Camdenite. Dawn Bunch is one whose purpose is to help readers receive enlightenment and to help them find out who they are in life. Dawn Bunch is love, joy, peace, harmony, prosperity and hope.  That is who Dawn Bunch is. I come back to my home town to give back all that I can and to help the women of Camden transform into that loving being that God created them to be. 

Collins:
Camden knows you as a professional in sports, entertainment and business.  What motivated you to become an author?

Dawn:
I have an aunt of mine to thank for that.  She introduced me to the universal laws of life that now govern my life.  The motivation came from viewing life very differently. I view life as an abundant life. That’s what God has given us.  I was also inspired by having the desire to give back to the women by pulling them back in and letting them know that life is grand and it’s fabulous to be forty and it’s beautiful. 

Collins:
Many women today are experiencing challenges in their lives. What message can one get when reading your book, “Women of Timelessness”? 

Dawn:
There are three messages, loving your mind, body and spirit.  The first is loving your mind and that you do have control over all of your thoughts. You are a vibration being and live in a vibration universe. Vibration is everything and whatever your thoughts are, you will get more of the vibrations whether it is good or bad.  I want to send a message to the ladies that are experiencing difficult times that sometimes we stand in our own way. If we can just get out of our own way and be receptive of all the infinite possibilities that exist through the eyes of God, then you will not be blocking your blessings.  In other words, you are bucking your own kind.  Once you surrender to that resistance, those blessings will come to you in an overflow. 

As far as the body is concerned, a healthy mind and soul comes from an encumbered mind and body.  I want to send a message that you must take care of your body.  Many of us neglect our bodies and the signs that our bodies give us.  The most important thing is to have a healthy body because it promotes healthy thoughts; needless to say that your body is everything. 

As far as your soul is concerned, many of us have our spiritualism but we tend to get lost in the shuffle. My giving back to you as far as reaching enlightenment as far as who you are, you develop a marriage between your thoughts and your emotions to develop that inner spiritualism. You must cleanse your spiritualism as well for all of these things to work together. 

I am a living witness that when you cleanse your mind, body and soul that there is longevity, joy, happiness, peace and harmony but you must do the work. 

Collins:
Have you had any speaking engagements to introduce, “Women of Timelessness” and how can someone get a copy of it? 

Dawn:
The book was released on August 26, 2011. You can get a copy of this as well as my first book by going to www.dawnbunch.co

Collins:
What message do you give to a young woman about maturing into the future? 

Dawn:
Young women can look forward to living a fabulous and classy life. You have to do the work and it’s a process that’s not done over night but you have to be willing and dedicated.  I say in the book, “I have what you want but you got what I need”. What you want is substance for your mind, body and soul.  I have that. What I need is your dedication and your attention so that you can apply what I am giving you. I also want to indicate to the readers that you must believe. Believe in the power of thought, in the goodness of this universe. You will begin to believe that you have control over your thoughts and how you feel.  You will begin to believe that you can do, say or have anything. 

Collins:
At what point in time did life become fabulous for you? 

Dawn:
Life became fabulous for me when I had my true awakening.  Although things that we experience in life are the reason why we are where we are today, good or bad.  

Collins:
What’s next for Dawn Bunch? 

Dawn:
To continue to enlighten and encourage the beautiful women that God has created. 

Collins:
Would men get a better understanding of women by reading this book?

Dawn:
If a man read, “Women of Timelessness”, he would be enlightened to the transformation that he will witness with his wife, significant other, mother, sister, aunt, etc. It will be beneficial to him as well because that woman in his life would have identified and understood who she is in life. This will offer a great connection and experience to all men that read this book. 

Collins:
How can people get in contact with you for engagements? 

Dawn:
I can be reached at 302-521-3628 or 302-366-8482. There is no current tour set up but you can reach me at my website at www.dawnbunch.com  and you can also blog me. 

Collins:
What do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal? 

Dawn:
Life is grand. Life is beautiful and all is well.  This is a must read, “Women of Timelessness.” I encourage everyone to read it and become enlightened and awakened. When you become awakened there is a sense of being complete. Being complete will also bring you happiness.

Collins:
Dawn Bunch is amazing and a great mentor for women of all ages having the opportunity to hear her views of empowerment in a blessing within itself. Dawn is now booking speaking engagements and hosting lectures.  Contact Dawn direct for more information. Also look to the upcoming issue of Anointed News Journal for follow up story. 

By Chris Collins

  If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

 

Ten Ways to Live a Healthier Life

By Executive Chef Kahlil Wyche

Over the next several months I am going to share some simple solutions to help you live a healthier life. But, first I want you to ask yourself the following questions:  Do you want to stay healthier, younger and energized for longer? Are you ready to take complete control of your health and welfare? Do you not know that you are God’s temple and that God’s spirit dwells within you? (1 Cor. 3:16 ESV)

Everyone knows you should eat right and exercise (easier said than done), but the challenge we face is the barrage of fast food chains that pop up every day. The never ending to do list combined with the hectic work & activity schedules, leaves us little to no to time to take care of ourselves properly. If we keep it “real” we can conveniently list about 50 + other reasons (excuses) to not do what is right for our own sake. It is my intention in this series to point you in the right direction towards making significant changes in your physical, mental, and spiritual well being. Following these basic principles you’ll begin to feel healthier, younger and more energetic if you pay attention to your health in all 10 areas I am going to share with you. These days more and more of us want to make changes in our life so that we live healthier and happier lives. 

Area One:  Add Exercise to Your Life

Getting exercise is an important part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle.  There are many different types of exercise that you can do, each of which is can be beneficial to your body in a variety of different ways. 

 Exercise & Benefits of creating new habits

There are many benefits to exercising, such as increased energy, weight loss, and even reducing the risk for certain diseases such as Type 2 Diabetes and heart disease.  Exercise is very important, especially given the sedentary lifestyle that most Americans tend to lead. If you want to lose weight and keep it off, exercise must be added to your daily routines.  You see I once heard a wise man once say that “Success comes in your daily routine,” a lot of times we will start out real strong with an exercise routine only to find that 2 – 3 weeks later that we are right back to our old habits. Studies have shown that it takes at least 66 days to form a new positive habit, so the 2 – 3 weeks that most people normally find themselves fizzling out at doesn’t even scratch the surface of coming to the ½ way mark of 66 days that it takes. So, what we have to do is begin to schedule exercise in our daily routine in order to create lifelong success. Here are three quick tips you can do right now to create the momentum for this to be part of your daily routine:

 

1.      Sit down and write out your typical day/week and see which items you can reprioritize so that you can make exercise a part of it.  (“Write the vision and make it plain”… Habakkuk 2:2)

2.      Pick accountability or exercise partner so that you can keep each other motivated and support one another in this epic change. (“Therefore encourage one another and build each other up, just as in fact you are doing.” 1 Thessalonians 5:11)

3.      Measure your results and be honest with yourself in making a conscious effort on staying the course to take care of yourself. (“The integrity of the upright shall guide them”… Proverbs 11:3)

 

Making Exercise a Fun Part of Your Life (Daily routine)

Leading a healthy lifestyle means eating right, getting enough sleep, and exercising regularly.  But what do you do if exercise is that one thing that you can’t bring yourself to follow through with on a regular basis?  There are many forms of exercise that you can incorporate into your life that are fun to do and participate in so that you get the workout that you need to stay fit and healthy. 

One way that you get moving is to join a sports team. There are many types of sports that you can choose to play depending on your interests: basketball, soccer, volleyball, or baseball.  When you play on a team you’ll find yourself getting the physical activity that your body and heart needs without having to spend hours each week motivating yourself to make it to the gym. 

Group exercises are another choice that you can make when it comes to getting in your weekly quota of physical fitness. Group exercises generally take place at the gym and more and more fitness centers are offering group exercises that are fun and a step away from the normal and boring routine of lifting weights.

Some popular choices of group exercises include belly dancing, kickboxing, hip hop dance, Pilates, and all levels of step classes.  When you exercise with a group of people you’re often more motivated to keep going since being part of a team with the similar goal of getting in shape is a powerful incentive.

Another way that you can introduce and maintain an adequate level of fitness in your life is to find an activity that you enjoy doing.  Don’t join the ranks of people at the gym, only because it’s the “in” thing to do to stay in shape, if you hate lifting weights or walking on the treadmill.  Find something that you love to do that gets you up and moving.

Some choices that you might want to consider include biking, hiking, canoeing, or power walking.  All of these fitness activities will give your heart the required workout, strengthen your muscles, and get your body mobile. 

If you like being around other people who share your same fitness interests you can join a biking or hiking club, joining others just like you as you plan your workout.  Or you may find that you enjoy biking by yourself, using it as the perfect opportunity to become focused on your own thoughts.

No matter where you are in your life fitness should become a daily part of your routine.  Pregnant women can stay in shape by modifying their exercise routine so that it’s safe for every stage of pregnancy.  And seniors need to keep their bodies and muscles toned so that they can combat the effects of aging, such as arthritis. 

Exercise is essential if you’re going to lead and maintain a healthy life.  Find your favorite form of exercise and stick with it so you can enjoy the benefits of a healthy body and mind.

Fitness in Small Steps

One of the fatal mistakes that many people make when they’re deciding to get into shape is to tackle the entire concept of “fitness” at one time.  Incorporating fitness into your life takes time and won’t happen overnight.  Your body, mind, and spirit need time to adjust to the many changes that will be happening as you start to add exercise to your daily routine.  This is why fitness in small steps is so important and will ensure that you’re less likely to quit when you become overwhelmed with the changes in your life.

The first thing that you need to do is start moving.  If you haven’t been active in a while you’ll want to start by adding walking to your day.  You need to walk for at least 30 minutes each day before you start to see changes in your fitness level.  You may decide that you want to continue walking after you’ve become more fit, or you may decide that you want to start power walking or hiking so that you can start to increase your fitness level.

Make sure that you invest in a good pair of walking shoes so that your feet are well supported and cushioned as you walk.  If you get sore feet from walking you won’t want to continue your fitness routine.  You might also want to buy a pedometer so that you can keep track of how far you walk each day.

For the first couple of weeks stick to the same walking routine so that you get used to some type of fitness.  You should measure the distance that you walk, as well as how long it takes you each day to walk this distance, so that you have a measuring stick against which you can calculate your fitness progress.  After a couple of weeks you can add some distance to the original total so that you’re slowly starting to walk more and more each week.  This way you won’t injure yourself by attempting to do more than your body is ready for.

Besides your daily walking routine you can find any and other ways to get moving.  This means taking the stairs instead of the elevator, parking your car around the corner from your destination and walking a block or two, and leaving your car at home whenever you can.  Your goal for fitness is to get moving and to keep moving.

 After a couple months of taking the above small steps towards fitness you’ll start to see a significant change in your fitness level.  You’ll find that you feel better, have more energy, are sleeping more soundly, and feel better about yourself. Well stay tuned next month when we will be talking about one of my favorite subjects, food.  We will be focusing on eating healthy until then, be blessed.

 

  If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

Author Shannon R. Bellamy, Discusses Controversial Book, “Pimps in the Pulpit” with the Nation’s Premier Faith-based and Urban Professional Newspaper, the Anointed News Journal.

The Shannon R. Bellamy story, “Pimps in the Pulpit”, has made national attention with the urban media.  She has been featured on television, in print and on the Michael Baisden Radio Show. 

Recently the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper, “The Anointed News Journal”, along with the assistant editor Crystal Tucker had an opportunity to interview Ms. Bellamy. It is our hope to use this story to create awareness and possibly offer some guidance that could bring closure and or began a healing process for those who have faced abuse in any form.  The Anointed News Journal does not endorse “Pimps in the Pulpit,” however we are a voice for the people and are willing to give Ms. Bellamy the same opportunity to be heard. The views and opinions of columnists and the public do not necessarily reflect those of the Anointed News Journal.  Feel free to respond.

Collins:
Who is Shannon R. Bellamy?

Bellamy:
I’m a single parent with four children, three daughters and one son.  I’m an entrepreneur. I’ve been an executive assistant for nineteen years in corporate America.  Afterwards I received my degree in culinary arts, which I am also a chef.  I’ve also done real estate for four years.  That’s what brought me to South Jersey.  I was one of the top producing agents in the State of New Jersey.  After I stopped selling real estate I became a flight attendant and after that I went back to school, which I am currently a Drexel University student and then there’s the book.

Collins:
You’ve recently written a book that was somewhat controversial and received a lot of media attention.  Tell us about the title of your book and what the public can expect when reading it.

Bellamy:
What the reader’s can expect from “Pimps in the Pulpit,” is a book that I deal with clergy abuse.  My version of what had taken place with me personally after having been in a relationship with my pastor and counselor for three years.

Collins:
When was the book released and how can people get a copy of the book?

Bellamy:
It was released in October 2009.  They can get the book at www.shannonbellamy.com and also online at Borders, Barnes and Noble, Books A Million, in Philadelphia at Black and Nobel, Horizon Book Stores and in Camden at La Unique.

Collins:
Why did you title the book “Pimps in the Pulpit”?

Bellamy:
When I looked at the word pimp, especially when Michael Baisden talked about it, I knew I would either hit or miss with the title. But I also defined the word.  We as people are surface people.  We just know pimp means a man that has a woman on the streets.  I did not want people to apply that I was ever that.  So I wanted to see if the word had another definition besides that.  It is also defined as a despicable person or a despicable act by a person.  So in my mind it made sense that I was talking about a despicable act by a preacher in the pulpit.

Collins:
Looking at an overview of your book and reading your bio, you mentioned that you were allegedly in a relationship with your pastor.  At what point did you feel you were offended that led you to write this book?

Bellamy:
I never felt that I was offended to write a book.  That’s not how it all happened.  In the beginning before the relationship had started, after the first encounter with the pastor I reported it to the Bishop.  The Bishop knew about the entire relationship from the beginning. By the time I had written the book I had already ended the relationship about a year and a half prior.  The pastor and I had moved on. I felt that God had revealed it to me in my dream that I was supposed to write this book.  When I did, I was concerned about how he would feel because it was not about hurting him.

Collins:
You mentioned that you felt violated initially and brought it to the Bishops attention.  Why did you then allegedly pursue a relationship with this individual?

Bellamy:
That’s not what happened.  There was a course of counseling for nine months.  He became my confidant.  In hind sight we were in a relationship without me even knowing it.  The intentions seemed pure the entire time.  It wasn’t until I was in a chaotic position when I lost my home that we had sex for the very first time.  I felt like he took advantage of me in that position because there was no reason for that.  I had seventy-two hours to move, my kids were being separated, I was packing up my things and was basically homeless.  The last thing on my mind was sex. 

I told someone I was not coming back to the church.  He asked why and I didn’t want to talk about it.  He told another pastor who called me to see what was wrong.  I told him what happened. I kept evidence just in case he denied it.  I was seriously upset because I felt violated. 

No one supposedly knew how to deal with it.  They went to the pastor I dealt with and basically just chastised him.  I’m thinking the Bishop would take care of it and assign me another counselor.  However several days later my pastor asks me why did I tell?  He told me the Bishop wasn’t upset that it happened but he was upset that I told.

Now I’m confused.  The Bishop did nothing nor did he refer me to another counselor or a female counselor.  This was a time when my husband returned from overseas and I was reading books on how to support my husband in hopes of working out my marriage.  I was trying to make my marriage work and then I got pregnant.  I called the pastor and told him I was pregnant by my husband and the pastor called me a whore.  I became instantly angry.  I didn’t see it then but his reaction was as if something was going on inside of him.  He encouraged me to get rid of the pregnancy, which I did.  He told me to divorce my husband and I followed his advice.

Collins:
You mentioned you allegedly had sex with this man once.  Was that it?

Bellamy:
After the first initial time, I reported it and nothing was done.  My pastor continued to check up on me to make sure I was fine.  He would share Biblical stories with me to support his behavior.  This worked for me because I was just going to church but I was not studying God’s word for myself.  I was under the impression that God would allow this relationship.

Collins:
So did you allegedly continue in the relationship?

Bellamy:
He came to visit me to discuss what we’ve done.  This was a month after I moved into a new home.  When he came, this visit became the beginning of our relationship. I initially fell in love with this man.  This man was the blue print for everything that I needed and wanted in a man.

Collins:
When I read about your background and see all of the good things you are doing such as speaking engagements, life coaching, entrepreneur, etc. you appear to be a strong Black woman.  How do you give someone that much power over you?

Bellamy:
What you see now is not the person I was back then.  He helped to create this.  What you see now is a direct reflection of being totally willing and submissive to him.  The world knows Shannon Bellamy.  He knows Shannon, which is a totally different person.

Collins:
If this pastor allegedly was your everything and your confidant, why would you write a book to expose him?

Bellamy:
By the time I wrote the book many things had taken place.  During the course of our relationship I did whatever he asked.  I had cosmetic surgery and did whatever this man said.  I look totally different today.  He wanted a certain type of woman and I became her.

Collins:
My question to you was what motivated you to write this book?

Bellamy:
I wrote this book to help other women.  At this point it wasn’t about him.  It was about so many other women who were in the same situation as I.  Those who are struggling in their lives because of this and they are ashamed and afraid of becoming humiliated in the public’s eye. They don’t know what to do and they have no voice.

Collins:
Did you have any conversations with him prior to writing the book and did you consider his thoughts?

Bellamy:
I had a conversation with him but considering his thoughts wasn’t an option.  I told him about my dream to write this book.  In the beginning he was mad and a lot of drama was going on.  He heard me on a radio interview and he called me in reference.  During this time I was disgusted with him. Our conversation at that time was about him getting some of the proceeds from the book. That was the end of our conversation.

Collins:
Let’s fast forward. You wrote the book. Distributed the book to the public and made some appearances.  How do you feel the public views you?

Bellamy:
It’s like a two sided coin.  There are the women who remind me that I slept with somebody’s husband.  Ok, I did! What’s your point? Some wonder if I accepted any responsibility for my actions but they can’t deal with my answer.  Then there’s the hundreds of people who support me and feel that men like this need to be exposed.  It happened to them and their daughters. I have more support with my book than nonsupport.

Collins:
Do you accept any accountability? Do you consider yourself to be a woman scorned?

Bellamy:
I’m definitely not a woman scorned.  Even now I consider him and how he feels.  As far as responsibility and accountability, I went to his wife and apologized.  When people ask if I accept any accountability I wonder what is it they want?  I apologized! Do they want me to tattoo it on my arm?  I am as transparent as they come. It is what it is like it or not.  He hurt his wife but she’s not my wife.  He knew he was married and he knew he was a pastor.  I should have had them all arrested in the beginning and had them in court but I was in love with this man.  Nothing else mattered.

Collins:
Are you still in love with this man?

Bellamy:
I do love him.

Collins:
You say you are a much different woman than a few years ago.  Do you feel he still has a grip on you or that you have moved on?

Bellamy:
I’ve moved on.  Looking for love! But moved on completely! I also moved on from that church.  I have not received a letter saying I’m not a member any more.  Last time I visited the church they called the police because they didn’t want me on their property.

Collins;
How did you explain this to your children?

Bellamy;
He was no stranger to my family.  He had keys to my house and my kids were not upset with the situation.  I told them I wrote a book and they think their mom is a celebrity.

Tucker:
I noticed in your bio that you noted you were sexually abused as a child.  Did you ever go to counseling for that?

Bellamy:
No.  I never went to counseling for my abuse.  I never talked about it.  I just moved on.  Whatever complication I faced in life I just moved forward and pursued whatever goal I had in my life.

Tucker:
Do you realize that what your book displays is a typical portrayal of a woman that has been sexually abused and the types of behavior that she goes through in that situation?

Bellamy:
Now I have.  My second book, “Breaking the Silence,” I talk about how I was raped at ages 5 and 6.  From the age 11 to 13 I was with a man who was 19 years old. A man who was beating me and having sex with me.  I talk about all those things in the next book that should be released next month. I talk about every man who has ever been in an authoritative position in my life has also violated me in a sexual manner.  That’s why when this happened with my pastor I didn’t run and get the police because I was used to not saying anything.

Tucker:
Does it occur to you that you should get counseling to overcome that victim type of mentality because in reality that is what set you up for the alleged situation with your pastor?

Bellamy:
Yes you’re right but no.  I don’t trust anybody with my mind.  That is the honest to God truth. The only person I would ever trust was my pastor.  I’ve been in church all my life but never a mega church.  My grandmother is a pastor; both my brother and uncle are pastors. For me to be so transparent with my pastor felt good for a change to finally have a man in my world who only wanted what was best for me.  Now he violated that and I don’t trust anybody.

Tucker:
You make reference in your book that you are saved (accepted Christ).  A man can lead you to God but it’s up to you to develop your own relationship with Him. You make a lot of references in your book that you prayed to God and believed that God answered you.  So in the need of a counselor do you believe that God will answer your prayer and send you someone you need to fulfill that?

Bellamy:
If that is the case then I say that He has fulfilled that because I have eight women in my life who are my friends and my sista’ girls. Even after the situation I didn’t want to hear from anyone.  But I trust them because they will not steer me in the wrong direction.

Tucker:
Out of these eight women are any of them familiar with the whole process of sexual abuse and the phases that women go through in dealing with it?

Bellamy:
I don’t know the answer to that question.  I would have to say no because I know none of them have ever experienced it.

Tucker:
If that’s the case then how can you think they are the ones that can help you?

Bellamy:
I just know that I don’t trust anybody with me but them.

Collins;
You do a lot of speaking and life coaching.  What advice do you offer a young lady or young man that might be in an abusive sexual relationship?

Bellamy:
My advice to them is to pray and ask God for help.  I told God that I did not want that for my life anymore. God took it away from me without me feeling any emotions.  If my pastor had left me, we would probably still be together now. But my prayer was that I wanted out and didn’t want to feel anything when I leave.  God gave me that.

I would encourage them to get with somebody of the same sex.  If any other man would have counseled me, I probably would have become a victim again if they had that same mentality. I don’t have any faith in pastors today. People always try to tell me what I need to be doing but why.  Why should I read my Bible every day? Why should I go to church every day? What is the purpose? I can’t say what goes on in the pews but I know what goes on in the pulpit. I was one of many girls that had that privilege. This has made my world a whole lot smaller and the only one I depend on now is God. I want to go to church but I don’t and that’s sad.  I don’t church hop. I’ve been in three churches my entire life.  There’s one church that has embraced me but it’s an all women church and that’s just not me. I do realize I need a spiritual father.  I was taken from my father at the age of seven.  My mother took that because she couldn’t have it. So even now I still yearn for it.  I’m sure when God is ready he will open that door and give me that.

When church leaders accept an oath to hold a position and they do wrong it should not just be acceptable.  I’m not exposing this man.  God exposed him. I’m just the vehicle he used.  People should have more accountability with their pastors to demand right.  We give a lot to these churches and we should be able to hold them accountable for what they give back and how they live their life.  If a leader is struggling with their flesh they probably shouldn’t be in that position to be tempted.  The counseling process for people should include a third party counseling or same sex counseling.  Open door counseling means nothing because things still can happen.

The overall purpose of my tour is to create awareness in all walks of life.  Sexual abuse happens everywhere; in the military, on the job and in the church.  My goal is to bring awareness to this situation.  My contact information is www.shannonbellamy.com or by telephone at (201) 759-8561.

Collins:
What is it that you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Bellamy:
When you are in therapeutic situation and you are being counseled by someone and you find yourself in an intimate relationship with them, it’s never an affair nor is it consensual. It’s abuse! I have a stage play coming out soon, “Pimps in the Pulpit” to address these issues.

In conclusion, it is recognized that this interview covers a controversial topic which leads us into a subject which has become rampant in the kingdom today.  The subject is slander.  The Late Latin word that slander comes from is scandalum, which means stumbling block, offense.  This is where the challenge comes for us as believers.  Do we desire to be chained to the rock of offense or do we desire to receive and accept the liberty by which Christ has set us free?  When we are believers in both word and deed; we choose the latter-so let a man examine himself.  Present company included.

Bondage is sin when liberty is available.  We say that in Christ, we live and move and have our being.  We must consciously remember that He is in us and we are in Him.  The more we remember; the freer we become.  When we are honestly submitting (coming under the authority of another within the boundaries of the word of God); then we know that greater is He that is in us than He that is in the world.  God is greater than anyone who has ever hurt us.  Why would we try to make people have greater power over our lives than God who made us?  That is what we are doing when we are recounting the report of the offense to other people and using it as an excuse to disregard the guidelines for Christian conduct which is our reasonable good service.

If we indeed take everything to the Lord in prayer, including those who have offended us, we are telling the only one who can truly do something about the person – God.

As stated by Bishop Gus Swain, Jr. (New Life Church Ministries, Pennsauken, NJ) in a Sunday sermon, “It does not matter if the report is true or false.  You are still saying something disparaging about another person.  You should be praying for them.”

The Bible is clear regarding believers’ responsibilities to one another as well as the responsibility of the leaders to the members.  The Bible contains the guidelines for church governance, so when we join a church, we must take the time to familiarize ourselves with the guidelines.  We cannot limit our knowledge to what a person says is in the Bible, because as Shannon states in her book (pg. 175), “Your perception is your reality.”  We as individuals must know the Bible and the Word of God for ourselves.

As we continue to learn to humble ourselves, we realize that the manifestation of Christ’s character in our lives is more valuable to our growth and development as individuals as opposed to our own justification for our behavior which is detrimental to our very lives. We should all ask ourselves the question:  Why should I remain bound when liberty is available?

The nation’s premiere faith-based and urban professional newspaper, “The Anointed News Journal” wishes to thank Ms. Bellamy, as well as you the reader and encourage you to seek the answers for overcoming your offenses that you may be free and free indeed.  If there are some events in your life that require assistance of a therapeutic nature, such as sex abuse, please seek the help you need.  It was once stated by a preacher that miracles do not go where they are needed.  They go where they are wanted.  Do you want your miracle?

By Rev. Christopher Collins and Crystal Tucker

     If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CAMcare Health Corporation Offers Top Docs and Health Care to Those Struggling with the High Cost of HMO’s 

Mark Bryant - President and CEO, shares outlook for offering affordable healthcare to the people of Southern New Jersey

Camden, NJ – In today’s tough economic times, more and more Americans are losing their jobs or being reduced to part-time status.  As a result many companies are reducing or eliminating healthcare coverage for their employees.  In fact, many companies will hire people part-time just to avoid paying employee benefits which could cost an additional $10,000 on top of the wages the employee is offered.

Healthcare being at the top of every election keeping politicians in Washington, DC on their toes seeking new ways to reduce cost and provide coverage for every American.  Having healthcare can be very frustrating to the working man or woman that works every day but has limited or no coverage.  It can also be a slap in the face when working people are denied coverage but those who have committed crimes, participated in substance abuse activities or choose not to work, can get medical coverage through the Department of Social Services. 

There are so many unanswered questions when the public is trying to protect their families and even themselves from having to face the day when a real medical emergency presents itself and there’s no coverage to pay the bill.  Some hospitals and large medical facilities offer Charity Care programs that will allow an uninsured person the opportunity to get services.  Some offer affordable healthcare programs that allow people to get services at a reduced rate.  There are also some free clinics that will see people for free.  Unfortunately, the fact of the matter is that millions of people everyday make a conscious decision not to go to the doctors when they are sick because they have no coverage.  Oftentimes that decision can be fatal.  Many issues that people are dying from everyday could be prevented if they had only been seen by a doctor who in many cases could have diagnosed an illness early on and provided some type of treatment for it.

What are the answers to solving the problem of a national healthcare crisis leaving millions of Americans hoping that they never have to face the reality of getting sick.  With this in mind, the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal”, spent a day with the CEO and President of CAMcare Health Corp, Mark Bryant, to get a deeper understanding of what can be done to provide affordable healthcare to people during these tough economic times.

Collins:
Who is Mark Bryant?

Bryant:
First of all I’m a child of God. Secondly, I’m the President and Chief Executive Officer of CAMcare Health Corporation. I’m a father, step father, husband and all of those things are Mark Bryant and I try to keep them in their appropriate proper order.

Collins:
Tell us about CAMcare, the history and where we are today.

Bryant:
CAMcare was founded in 1978 by a group of doctors and activists with the purpose of providing high quality preventive and primary healthcare to the residents of the city of Camden.  It’s uniqueness at that time was that it combined both health and mental health aspects of healthcare.  This was a unique model back in 1978. We started in a small church building behind Cooper Hospital with a couple of patient suites and we have grown a little bit over the years. First we added a South Camden site by moving into Three Cooper Plaza, across the street from Cooper Hospital. We operated there until 2004.  Somewhere in the 1993 range, we opened centers in East Camden and North Camden. A couple years later in 1995 we opened a center, and we made our first major purchase, in East Camden. We found that the East Camden site we had taken over from the county just didn’t have enough space. The bank was a tenant of ours.  We brought the building, renovated it and kind of grew into that site. We currently see about a quarter of our patients through that location.  We continued to grow and succeeded in building this facility downtown Camden.  We started planning this in the late 1990’s and completed the building in 2004. In July of 2004 we opened the Gateway Health Center which serves about half of our patients.  We did renovations to our North and South facilities and opened up locations in Paulsboro and in Clementon in 2005/2006. We also opened an Antioch facility in 2006 as well. In 2008 we opened a new facility in Odessa Polk-Jones along with the Housing Authority in its new community center.  This is primarily a dental site for us. We now operate about eight locations serving about 40,000 people annually with about 140,000 visits last year.

Collins:
What are the services that CAMcare provides?

Bryant:
We started off with internal medicine or adult medicine.  We provide pediatric services through our pediatric department. We have a family practice component.  We have an obstetric and gynecological department where we deliver babies and deal with women health needs. We have a dental department where we take care of dental needs operating about 36 chairs throughout all of our facilities.  We also provide podiatric care with our relationship with Foot Health Centers of Cherry Hill. Those are our core services that we provide through our locations. We cover the life cycles from birth through our gynecological department through near death through our internal medicine department. We follow all of our patients through an out-patient stand point and also in the hospitals.  We take care of them and manage their care through the healthcare system so that someone familiar with their health and prior health condition is taking care of them in the hospital. We think that is an important aspect of what we do. We also do a whole bunch of community outreach and actually are in the process of beefing up our outreach staff to achieve what is called primary care medical home status certification. We are working with HMO’s to kind of foster that. I think of this as an even higher touch organization then we are today. In the past doctors kind of sat back and waited for people to get sick and come to us.  Now we are going to be more proactive in getting out to the community and reaching out to people who haven’t been to see us in a year. Those who had emergency room visits and just left the hospital, our goal is to get them back into care within a week or two depending on the seriousness of their illness. We want to take care of them and make sure they are staying on the path to good health.

Collins:
Who qualifies for CAMcare? Do you have to have prior healthcare coverage from a major insurance carrier?

Bryant:
We like to think that everybody qualifies for CAMcare. We are a federally funded, federally qualifying community health center.  This means we are put in medically underserved areas to provide healthcare to the entire community without regards to an individual’s ability to pay. We use federal funds, state funds and scrape up funds wherever we can find them to provide care to everyone. We serve people who don’t have insurance, yet we try to get everyone in some type of plan whether they have insurance or not. We also try to get people in our uninsured plan that is a contract with the State of New Jersey we have called, “Letter of Agreement Contract.” This helps pay for some of the care that we provide to the uninsured. We have patients that are on sliding fees which go from $10 to a percentage based on someone’s income. We have a plan for just about everyone and accept most Medicaid and managed care health insurances.  We accept most major insurances.  We do not accept all insurance because we tried that for a while and it just didn’t work.  We did not get paid from so many people.  So many people had an insurance card that just didn’t attach to any money for primary care and by the time we figured that out, patients have already been seen. We’ve limited ourselves to about 40 insurances that we accept and if you are uninsured, we accept uninsured patients here every day.  People who have fallen out of insurance or have lost their jobs during these tough economic times now have a place they can come and get high quality healthcare for little as nothing with a $10 co-pay.

Collins:
Speaking of high quality healthcare, what types of individuals do you seek when adding to your team of professionals working here at CAMcare?

Bryant:
All of our physicians are board certified.  Most of them are American Grad, which is kind of a higher standard. When it comes to our provider staff we look for individuals that have a reason or desire to be in the community.  I actively get involved in the hiring process in looking for individuals to come into our company because if they are not here for the right reason, then they probably are not right for CAMcare. A lot of health centers are just looking for the next warm body and as a result they turn a lot of staff.  We’ve taken the approach that we want people who want to be here and I try to sell them on the fact of making reasonable money.  We are not at the top of the pay range they might make elsewhere but at the end of the day when they leave here they will know that they’ve provided care for people who without their talent and skills would not get this type of quality healthcare in one of the poorest cities in the nation.  So there is a type of gratification of providing care where it’s really needed and desperately needed. They could go out into private practice or out in to a suburban setting and probably make really good money but here it’s really need and for them it seemed to have worked.  Our average provider has been here 15.3 years.  We try to get the right people for the right reasons, those who have some roots in our community and a desire to serve in underserved communities. This works for them because they are doing work that they want to do and it works for us because they are here to provide good care.  We have people from Yale, University of Pennsylvania and all kinds of prestigious universities that are practicing here and who are all board certified.  All of our nurses are certified, all of our medical assistants are certified our dental staff soon will all have certified dental assistants. We’ve kind of raised that quality to make sure it’s there.  We are also Joint Commissioned Accredited and have been since 2000.  This is another seal of approval in the healthcare industry. Our diabetes center received excellence from the American Diabetes Association which is a very prestigious achievement. Very few of our competitors have this distinction.  We do diabetic education and teaching health classes and nutrition classes.  In a lot of ways we know that we’ve built the quality in.  A number of our doctors have been nominated and selected as “Top Docs” and one who was selected in another selection pole this year. Over time different ones from our provider staff has been selected by their counterparts. Obviously we don’t have the biggest marketing budget to go out and push them, so when they are selected as a “Top Doc,” it’s because they are just that.

Collins:
Oftentimes in the urban community a free clinic is perceived with a negative tone. I’ve been a patient with CAMcare for over 15 years and have experienced quality care, state of the art equipment and top doctors.  What do you want to say to people about CAMcare?

Bryant:
First of all, I don’t run a clinic, I run a health center and we refer to ourselves as a health center in all of our literature and in all of the things we do.  I think that is part of the difference. When I came to CAMcare I wanted to run a health center.

It’s not a free clinic. It’s not even free. There is a co-pay that people pay that’s been as low as $2 and now $10. $2 was the minimum at one time. Someone could have easily gone out and hustled up $2 for care. This makes you feel like you are a customer now and you’ve contributed towards your care whether it’s 100% or part of it, the expectation from your side is that you paid for your care and you have an expectation that you are going to get quality and be treated a certain way as a customer as opposed to a free clinic.

I wanted the places that I operated to look and feel like the places I have gone to as a kid growing up.  Like a doctor’s office. It would be the same quality of care in terms of quality that has always been here at CAMcare. That our facilities, equipment and technology would meet the clinical quality that has always been here and that we would look and feel like a place that I could take my mother, that I can use myself. Anyone in this entire community whether they were destitute or very affluent could certainly come in and feel comfortable that they were going to get quality care in a good environment and that they would be handled in terms of service in a customer friendly way. We are working on the service part but that’s always a work in progress.

Collins:
Many people today are working in part-time status without medical benefits.  How important can CAMcare be to those people?

Bryant:
As I indicated before we have what we call a sliding fee scale. This is based on your percentage of poverty from 100% to 250% of the poverty level in the State of New Jersey. It’s your income and family size over those poverty guidelines. It will put you on this sliding fee scale so that if your income is lower because you are only working part-time, it may qualify you to land somewhere on the lower part of the sliding scale and to be able to access the full array of healthcare services for whatever that cost is.  That could be as low as $10.  So for as low as $10 you could come in and see the OBGYN, for $10 you can come in and get dental services, for $10 you could come in and see the internist or your kids can see the pediatrician and get all their shots. I think children need to get about 40 shots between the ages of 1 and 5, so for $10 they can get 4 or 5 shots and get a physical by the doctor, etc. We also have a pharmaceutical program where we assist people with their pharmaceuticals. We have a nutritional program and counseling with social workers on board and a tremendous array of services we provide to help with any of the needs we can identify that you may have. We try to put you on the right track to get whatever you need to make you and your family healthier to do what you have to do, go make that money.

Collins:
In conclusion, what do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Bryant:
Hopefully God has blessed you with good health but if not, come to CAMcare and we will try to get you back on that path.  I believe spiritually God wants us all to be healthy, wealthy and wise.  We are here to certainly provide the health portion of that and to make the community we are in, the Camden community-at-large as healthy as possible.  Our goal is to spread the healthcare model that we built here to as many people as possible and start to improve the health and wellness of the entire community. As the agapelistic leader of CAMcare’s primary healthcare community, we keep trying to set the bar higher and higher for ourselves so that the healthcare that we deliver to more and more people will start to affect their lives in such a way that we are starting to change lives. Our model for this year is, “Let’s change lives.” I guess I will leave you with that.  We are trying to change lives and make their healthcare better.

Collins:
Having the opportunity to spend a morning with Mark Bryant was very rewarding for me.  It certainly opened my eyes to what many services CAMcare has to offer.  As I mentioned earlier, I’ve been a patient for several years primarily utilizing the dental services.  I have met some of my closest friends as a result of coming to CAMcare.  Attending the community outreach events they often do is always a fun time with entertainment, food, celebrity appearances, information, resources and a chance to meet the many collaborating partners CAMcare has.  Mark Bryant is a wonderful caring man.  At one time he even offered to bring to me clothes from his very own closet to give to those living in the former “Tent City.” His level of care for the community certainly reflects when walking through the facilities they have. Recently, the nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” honored Mark Bryant as one of our “Circle of Winner Nominees.” Today we salute him as our mover-and-shaker for the month. If you are uninsured or concerned about losing your medical insurance coverage due to employer downsizing and you don’t know where to turn to, I encourage you to turn to CAMcare.  You can find them in any direction.  For those of you who do have medical insurance, CAMcare offers top quality care with top doctors and have the awards and honors to back it up.

By Chris Collins

     If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess Opens on Broadway with Curtain Call and Cast Party

Broadway gets a new look at Catfish Row, with fresh dramatic perspective and a cast boasting Norm Lewis and Audra McDonald, in The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess, which officially opened on Broadway Jan. 12 at the Richard Rodgers Theatre.

The production was named Time Magazine's Musical of the Year and stars Audra McDonald, Norm Lewis and David Alan Grier.

The musical is being performed at Richard Rodgers Theater at 226 West 46th St. It was previewed in December and opened Jan. 12. It is slated to run six days a week through Sept. 30.

"The Gershwins based the original opera on a novel by Dubose Heyward, and many of the opera's lyrics are taken from that. The original 1935 opera was ground-breaking and historically very important.

George and Ira's Gershwin's ground-breaking work, reimagined by director Diane Paulus, musician Dierdre Murray and playwright Suzan-Lori Parks, stars Audra McDonald, Norm Lewis and David Alan Grier.

Synopsis:
A two-and-a-half hour reworking of George and Ira Gershwin's folk opera about the crippled Porgy and his love for seductress Bess that leads him to a confrontation with her murderous boyfriend, Crown, in 1920's Charleston, SC. Includes classic songs "Summertime," "Bess, You Is My Woman Now," "I Got Plenty O' Nuttin'" and "I'm on My Way."

According to the producers, Porgy and Bess "is set in Charleston’s fabled Catfish Row, where the beautiful Bess struggles to break free from her scandalous past, and the only one who can rescue her is the crippled but courageous Porgy. Threatened by her formidable former lover Crown, and the seductive enticements of the colorful troublemaker Sporting Life, Porgy and Bess’ relationship evolves into a deep romance that triumphs as one of theater’s most exhilarating love stories."

Norm Lewis (Sondheim on Sondheim, Side Show, Les Miserables) stars as the crippled beggar Porgy opposite four-time Tony Award winner Audra McDonald (Ragtime, Marie Christine, Master Class) as Bess. They are joined by two-time Tony nominee David Alan Grier (The First, Race, Dream Girls) as Sportin' Life and Tony nominee Joshua Henry (The Scottsboro Boys, American Idiot) as Jake.

The ensemble includes Allison Blackwell, Roosevelt Andre Credit, Trevon Davis, Joseph Dellger, Wilkie Ferguson, Alicia Hall Moran, Andrea Jones-Sojola, Lisa Nicole Wilkerson, Christopher Innvar, Carmen Ruby Floyd, David Hughey and Julius Thomas III.

The creative team includes choreographer Ronald K. Brown, set designer Riccardo Hernandez, costume designer Emilio Sosa and Tony Award-winning lighting designer Christopher Akerlind. Acme Sound Partners design sound. Orchestrations are by William David Brohn and Christopher Jahnke, with music supervision by David Loud.

According to the producers, Porgy and Bess "is set in Charleston’s fabled Catfish Row, where the beautiful Bess struggles to break free from her scandalous past, and the only one who can rescue her is the crippled but courageous Porgy. Threatened by her formidable former lover Crown, and the seductive enticements of the colorful troublemaker Sporting Life, Porgy and Bess’ relationship evolves into a deep romance that triumphs as one of theater’s most exhilarating love stories."

Tony-nominated Hair director Diane Paulus directs the streamlined, two-and-a-half-hour version of the musical, which replaces portions of the sung recitative with dialogue. It is playing an extended run through Sept. 30.

The Gershwin and Heyward estates gave Paulus their blessing to take a fresh approach to the four-hour opera. Paulus brought on board Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks (Topdog/Underdog, Book of Grace), who is credited with adaptation and additional scenes, and Pulitzer Prize nominee Diedre Murray (Running Man), credited with musical adaptation.

"We went back and looked at all the original sources, the 1925 novel that Dubose Heyward wrote called 'Porgy,' the play that he wrote with his wife in 1927, [and] we looked at the movie that Sydney Poitier made… even that fed our approach on this," Paulus told Playbill.com. She said the creative team's goal was to "take a classic from the past and bring it forward not in a way that updates it or changes it, but makes the original pulse like it was written yesterday."

"It's a beautiful, beautiful opera," Parks added. "Often in my own work, I reach back into the past to bring things forward. My work is almost a bridge for stories; it seemed very natural [to work on Porgy and Bess]. I felt like I'd been called."

For tickets, visit Ticketmaster.com. The Richard Rodgers Theatre is located at 226 West 46th Street.

Dear Mr. Collins,

“As we know these are definitely trying times nationally and internationally. The world is crying out for more than just what we can see with our eyes. It is crying out for God. It seems to be no coincidence that a number of the shows on Broadway have Godly themes: such as Jesus Christ Superstar, Godspell, Leap of Faith, and the spiritually moving show Porgy and Bess. There can be no excuse for many who walk out of these shows, and not realize that God is coming back soon. May these shows point everyone to the true source of hope in a darkened world and enlighten the audiences that come to them, to realize God is the same yesterday, today, and forevermore. May God bless you always,” said Frank Holmes.

By Chris Collins

 

 If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

Disney’s Geno Segers Scores on Stage and Television as a Fan Favorite “Actor has ties to local community”

Hollywood, CA - Geno Segers was born in Winston Salem, North Carolina to Lonnie G. Segers and Sandra E. Oliver. While growing up, Geno, a wrestler, football player and track athlete; won a city championship in football and wrestling while attending Carver High School. After moving on to East Forsyth, Geno became the 1st Two Time State Wrestling Champ at East Forsyth High School. After being named to the All State Football Team, he then accepted a full scholarship from Western Carolina University where he had tremendous success as a football player.

After making the 1st team Sport Network All American and just missing out on the NFL by a few pounds and less than 2 tenths of a second, he moved to Charlotte NC. While in Charlotte, Geno was a member of the Barrons Minor League Football team for two years. After winning a National Championship he left to pursue a career in International Rugby. After playing for the USA team, both nationally and internationally, Geno moved to New Zealand to play for the Richmond Rovers. At 6’4″ and 290lbs, Geno was a giant 2nd rower. He then moved back to wrestling and in his 1st year he became the New Zealand National Champ at 130kg class. Always willing to try his hand at any new sport, Geno spent time cliff diving, Sumo wrestling and full contact wrestling, Geno’s career includes a teaching stint in NC teaching high school algebra before returning New Zealand and went into business for himself as a small trader buying and selling goods all over Auckland, New Zealand.

A pivotal turn in his career, Geno took a dare and went to a Walt Disney audition which landed him the part as a bass in the chorus. Being a part of the original Sydney Australia Lion King Cast was the 1st time Geno had been in front of so many people where there was no one trying to hurt him! It was at this moment he knew he had found what he had been looking for in a career. After two years as a bass in “The Lion King,” Geno earned the role of “Mufasa” in the Melbourne season. He was also the original cast “Mufasa” for China. Once the touring company closed, Geno headed back to the states to play the role of “Mufasa” in a touring company of the show. Geno performed to crowds in Denver, Los Angeles, Omaha, Cincinnati, Austin, St. Louis, Cleveland, Honolulu, Mexico City and Milwaukee. Geno is now living in Los Angeles pursuing a career in TV and Film.

It was at this moment that Geno had finally found what he had been looking for in a career. His true calling is being a performer.

Voice and stage roles

At the suggestion of a friend, he auditioned for voice ads at a New Zealand radio station. His voice (Segers is a bass) earned him a lot of attention, and caught the attention of an agent that led Segers to be cast as Mufasa in the Australian production of The Lion King. He went on to star in the American and Chinese productions as well.

Television

Unhappy with the lack of leading roles for basses, Segers returned to New Zealand, where he got a request to send in a reel for Pair of Kings. They wanted someone who "spoke like James Earl Jones but looked like The Rock."  Segers landed the role of Mason Makoola, the guard of twin kings Brady and Boomer on a Polynesian island called Kinkow. He is currently the co-host of a Disney XD show called Fort Boyard, (with Laura Hamilton).

Geno Segers stars as Mason, the intimidating and superstitious royal guard whose main priority above protecting the kings is protecting his daughter Mikayla, in the Disney XD comedy series, “Pair of Kings.”

No surprise in the renewal of “Pair of Kings” since the show has become Disney XD’s No. 1 series across all key kid and boy demos, including kids 6-14 and Boys 6-14. It ranks second in total viewers (684,000) behind veteran animated series Phineas and Ferb.

Production and filming starts in Feb., 2011. The series stars Mitchel Musso and Doc Shaw as fraternal twins who must relocate from their Chicago home to the island of Kinkow after they learn they are the rightful heirs to the throne of this odd kingdom. Rounding out the cast is Kelsey Chow, Ryan Ochoa and Geno Segers as Mason.

 

Geno auditioned & landed a role in Walt Disney’s “Lion King” production in Sydney, Australia. Shortly thereafter, he earned the lead role of “Mufasa” for the Melbourne season. Segers later performed as “Mufasa” in the China production and joined the North American touring cast where he performed to crowds across America.

 

From the Editors Desk

Although Geno was born in Winston Salem, NC he spent quite a bit of his childhood through young adult years in Camden, NJ.  Geno is the nephew of former City of Camden employee and supervisor of the tax office, Cora Harper.  Geno and his younger brother Dominic Segers spent each summer on Princess Avenue and made many friends and with the neighborhood children and myself who is a distant cousin. If Geno and Nicki were not in New Jersey, I would hop in the car with Aunt Cora and Uncle Obie and travel to Winston Salem to hang out with them riding skateboards and listening to the rock band KISS or a very young Whitney Houston.

Geno was always just a little bigger than most of us and had hair and the physique of the Greek God Hercules.  I remember one of our first encounters of controversy was during a summer recreation trip with the City of Camden, while at the lake some kids through mud in Geno’s hair. Geno was a little upset but showed no fear. He just walked into the lake and washed his hair that was long enough to run pass his shoulders. He was always humorous and bringing many laughs to us kids on Princess Avenue and those of us in the Parkside neighborhood. Often times we’d spend a lot of time and money at the local pizza store playing video games.  Other times we did what most kids did in those days, played football in the streets and on any piece of grass lot or yard big enough. We were a close niche group of guys; Chris, Guy, Brian, Dana, Michael, Petton, Jeffery, Gregory, Brad, Craig, Robert, Dychelle, Jimmy, Spanky, Jameal, Della, Gwen, Danny and a few others.

Geno was always very athletic and impressive to the coaches at Camden High School when they’d see him come with me into the weight room during summer workouts for the football team.  He was so talented that one summer around the age of 16, he picked up a basketball for the first time and was unbelievable in his ability to master the game. 

As kids we all dreamed of being on stage one day and even being a part of Disney’s Mickey Mouse Club as a Musketeer or even the show Zoom that feature many teenagers.  Some of us had the opportunity to pursue and perform on stage.  We also dreamed of becoming professional athletes and a few have had their opportunities to excel in sports.

As we sit back today reminiscing of our childhood days, we often call each other when flipping channels and seeing Geno on television.  We are all extremely proud of him and are his biggest and truest fans.  Not just fans but we are true brothers from the old neighborhood.  Hey, don’t be surprised to see Geno again walking through Camden, NJ or visiting the schools and sharing his story with the students.   I certainly agree with Geno, Hollywood is where he belongs.  As funny as he was as a young man and as physical and big as he was, God had to have a special place for him as God has special places for people like Geno to touch and heal the hearts of people around the world.

In a cab and on his way to Fashion Week in New York City, Geno Segers tells the story of how a star athlete from Winston-Salem with no theatrical aspirations ended up with a lead role on Disney’s new comedy series “Pair of Kings” after moving his game from the field to the stage.

But even amidst the noise of blaring car horns, there’s no mistaking the slow Southern drawl that escapes as talk turns to ACC football and barbecue. While Segers may have been around the world and back, home is never too far away. And it’s where his story begins.

Segers grew up on the east side of Winston-Salem as what he calls a “middle-of-the-road kid.” His parents divorced when he was young but were equally influential in his life, he said, teaching him to make good decisions and instilling in him the importance of attending college. Segers attended Carver High School for the first two years of high school and then transferred to East Forsyth for his junior and senior years, earning recognition in football and wrestling.

After accepting a full scholarship to Western Carolina, Segers enjoyed a successful college career as a linebacker and graduated with a degree in engineering. When a career in the NFL didn’t work out, Segers began playing international rugby in Auckland, New Zealand.

Playing rugby led to a foray into other international sports before he went into business as a trader in New Zealand, Segers said. In 2001, he returned to the United States before moving back to New Zealand where — on a dare — he auditioned for a role in the Sydney, Australia, and production of Disney’s “The Lion King.”

“I didn’t foresee any acting or singing in my future,” he said. “I enjoyed singing in the shower or with my car windows up, but I didn’t see it going anywhere.”

It definitely went somewhere. After landing a role as a bass in the chorus, Segers went on to earn the lead role of Mufasa for the Melbourne season and later in the China production and as part of a touring cast in North America.

In addition to his roles in “The Lion King,” Segers has appeared in “Night at the Museum 2” as well as other TV and live performances in the United States and abroad.

While acting was not part of Segers’ original game plan, working with kids was.

“I wanted to talk to kids about making good decisions and becoming productive members of society,” he said. “I didn’t envision being on TV, but my child audience has grown exponentially. I didn’t anticipate it growing like that.”

With the successful launch of his “Hold It on the Road Foundation” in Forsyth County, Segers will be traveling home to Winston-Salem more regularly in hopes of reaching more kids. The foundation targets kids who are “in the middle of the road and could go either way,” he said.

“If you make a good decision, you can hold your life on the road,” he said. “It’s easy to keep a car on the road that’s already on the road; it’s harder to get one out of the ditch. If you can hold it on the road, it will be all right.”

 

Things have turned out all right for this local guy who likes Mr. Barbecue and Pulliam’s hot dogs.

He didn’t arrive where he is today by a direct route, but he did arrive. And he’s looking forward to continuing to tell the story — wherever that road may lead.

“Had I gone into drama before sports, I wouldn’t understand the team concept,” Segers said. “You’re a part of the story and a part of the team in telling the story.”

The nation’s premier newspaper for winners, the Anointed News Journal encourages you to tune into Disney’s XD channel and tune into “A Pair of Kings”, to see Geno at his best brining smiles to more than a half million viewers around the world.  We salute Geno for his success on stage and on the silver screen.  We also salute him especially for his great character as a humanitarian and friend.  Feel free to join Geno’s fan page on Facebook and talk with him via Facebook, Twitter, RSS feed or email.

By Chris Collins

If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

Compassionate Care Offers A Whole New Approach To Hospice

Anthony Bolden, MSW, LSW, Program Director Shares His Outlook for Providing Care to Terminal Loved Ones

Westampton, NJ – Oftentimes when a loved one is dealing with a terminal illness, or approaching the final stages of life, families struggle with making hard choices of how to best care for that individual and comfort them during what might be the most difficult time of their life.  Through insurance and government programs, there are companies that exist that specialize in caring for your loved one during the final stages of life and working along with the families to make this transition a better process.  Some companies will even go a step further and provide interaction and comfort to the immediate family members with the clergy.  With this in mind, I had the pleasure of meeting a young man that has a huge heart for caring for families dealing with the struggles of providing care for their loved one that has a short life expectancy.

Anthony Bolden, MSW, LSW is the program director for Compassionate Care Hospice, located in Westampton, NJ. During an exclusive interview with the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal”, Bolden share his outlook for Compassionate Care Hospice.

Collins:
Who is Anthony Bolden?

Bolden:
I am the Program Director for Compassionate Care. I’m a social worker as well and have been working in hospice for about twelve years and Compassionate Care Hospice for five years. In my role as program director, I’m involved in making sure that the very services we provide for patients and families are functioning as they should be.

Collins:
Explain to our readers what hospice is.

Bolden:
There’s a lot of misconceptions about hospice.  The main thing I want to first get out is that hospice is a different type of treatment.  It is for patients who have an illness where the focus is less on curing them and more on keeping them comfortable. We give treatments to patients that are designed around relieving the pain or whatever symptoms they are having whether it is a physical, spiritual or emotional symptoms, our goal is to relieve them of these problems. 

Collins:
Are these services provided at a healthcare facility or are the provided in the residence?

Bolden:
Hospice care is provided wherever the patients’ home is.  Whether it is in a residential, assisted living or nursing facility, the hospice services are provided to the patients wherever they are living.  We also provide hospice services for patients in, in-patient services too.

Collins:
What types of services do you offer?

Bolden:
When a patient is enrolled into the hospice program, we provide a number of services that are designed around relieving the symptoms.  We first have a nurse that will visit the patient weekly. The nurse is mostly involved in relieving the patient’s physical symptoms. We have psychosocial support which involves a social worker and a chaplain. They will come out as needed as well.  They will discuss the patient’s spiritual issues, religious issues and any social issues.  Oftentimes if a patient has some financial stresses in their life or have some living problems at home, those problems get worse as the patient develops chronic or acute illnesses. Lastly, but also the most important service we offer is that we provide a Home Health Aid.  This is a person who usually comes out to the patient every day.  They will bathe and dress the patient and really give the primary caregiver a little bit of a break. All of the provisions for the patient are provided most of the time with no charge, almost all of the time.  Medicare covers these services 100% with no co-pay and no deductible.  Most insurance companies mirror Medicare and of course sometimes we have some patients who don’t have any insurance at all.  Compassionate Care is committed to taking care of that population who do not have health coverage too free of charge most of the time.  The other service we provide is the patient’s durable medical equipment. The medical bed, oxygen supplies, hospital supplies, adult diapers, gloves, various skin lotions and we also cover the cost of their medications which are delivered right to their home.  So we really have an all encompassing care that we provide for the patient.

Collins:
Ho does Compassionate Care Hospice interact with the families and how are you perceived by them?

Bolden:
Oftentimes when a patient is referred to hospice care they are at a crossroad and there are so many different choices that the patient and family have to make.  The focus and care, as I said before, is going from one that is providing a cure to one that is now providing comfort. Oftentimes families are asked to make decisions about advanced directives and living wills and feeding tubes.  That’s incredibly overwhelming for anyone to have to make. Part of the hospice program is not just to provide services to the patient but to also support the family in making those decisions and helping them work through their feelings about those decisions. 

Oftentimes when a family enrolls a patient into hospice, they will embrace the hospice philosophy and then they won’t.  It’s a process.  It’s not the ending of one process and the beginning of another, patients will and families will have mixed feelings over the course of weeks and months that they are receiving our services.  The job of our team is to recognize that and to help those families deal with those changes and feelings they are having.

Collins:
This might be a difficult question to ask.  What is the approximate time frame that an individual receives hospice care?

Bolden:
That’s an excellent question and one that I really want to answer because there is this perception that patients who are referred to hospice are referred to hospice when life is measured in days. That is often the case, however, the benefit of hospice, and this is set up by Medicare, is that the patient should be referred to hospice when the life expectancy is six months or less.  However, for various reasons patients are referred at the very end of life.  That can be a self fulfilling prophecy because when you see that every time a person is referred to hospice they only have days to live, you start to think that’s the only thing hospice is for.  That really isn’t.  We do a nice job with patients when they are referred at the very end but we could do a much better job when we are able to work with that family or patient over a period of weeks or months.

I can’t completely answer your question but the average expectancy that we have for hospice is that a patient is on for about 30 days.  We want to see that number go higher because patients are really entitled to our care much earlier in the process.

Collins:
You spoke of providing care for the insured and uninsured.  How do you receive your funding to operate a hospice program?

Bolden:
We receive the large bulk of our funding from Medicare and Medicaid. About 75% comes from Medicare and the rest from Medicaid and private and commercial insurance.  Hospice started out as a place for patients who needed end of life care and had nowhere else to turn to. That’s not what we are about but we still want to hold true to that mission of taking care of patients regardless of their situation and regardless of their funding.  It is through the funding of patients that have insurance that we are able to keep that mission alive.  We provide all of the services to those patients just the same as we do for those patients that do have insurance.

Collins:
There are many companies that provide hospice care.  What makes Compassionate Care Hospice unique?

 That’s a good question. Of course I’ve been working for this company for 5 years so I’m a bias individual here but I can say that one of the reasons that make our company here in New Jersey unique is that we have longevity with our staff.  We have staff that has been involved in hospice for many years and are experts at what they do.  The other thing is that we’ve gone beyond the traditional hospice model and have developed programs that are going to meet the specific needs of patients depending upon what their illness is that is bringing them to us.  A lot of times when patients think of hospice, they think only of cancer.  We’ve developed programs that are specifically for patients that have other types of illnesses like heart failure, end stage lung disease and end stage dementia. Those are things that I think separates us from other hospices. 

The other area that we really excelled in is that when patients are enrolled in hospice will say to their doctors, “I’m tired of going to the hospital.” These are patients who really want to stay at home, and that is where we really shine.  We have been very successful keeping patients at home and out of the hospitals when their life expectancy really is measured in days as opposed to weeks or months.  We provide 24 hour care in the home where we will keep a nurse in there all day and all night.  In addition to taking care of that patient, we allow the family to be just that, the family. They don’t have to be the nurse and the daughter or the nurse and the wife but they can just be the wife. They can just be the child and have that relationship and know that somebody else is going to be doing the care for them at that point.

Collins:
What areas do you provide service for?

Bolden:
My program provides services from Mercer County down to Salem County including Camden, Burlington and Gloucester Counties. Compassionate Care Hospice is located in about 20 states.  We cover the entire State of New Jersey, the entire State of Delaware and about half of the Eastern part of Pennsylvania as well as New York, the Mid-West down to Atlanta.  We cover the entire tri-state area.

Collins:
Some cultures embrace hospice care more than others.  What do you want to say to those who are unfamiliar and might have a fear of hospice?

Bolden:
That’s a very good question to ask.  One of the things that makes hospice different from other types of care is that there is a physical component and a medical component to what we are doing in taking care of the patient and the family. Death is a very unique experience.  It only happens once to the patient and as for the family sometimes it’s the very first time they are dealing with it. How different cultures respond to that death, we find can also be very unique.  We find that some cultures will respond in a way where there can be a lot of anger, disbelief and distrust. We are able to work with all cultures to know what some responses are and we try to make the experience less stressful and show sensitivity to them that they may not otherwise get, and to show them that their reaction to this dying process are normal and that we are here as a support for them.

Collins:
What advise do you offer to an individual who may be interested in pursuing a career in hospice? Is hospice a rewarding field?

Bolden:
Whenever I get a phone call from somebody who wants to go into the field of hospice, whether it’s a nurse or social worker, home health aide, chaplain, etc. usually what they tell me is that this is a calling.  They know this is what they want to do.  So, if somebody wants to go into this field, it’s probably something they’ve been thinking about and it is very much a calling.

I’ve been doing this for twelve years and I can’t do anything else. This is it! This is what I will be doing for the rest of my life.  A lot of times people will ask me how can I do this, isn’t this depressing?  I can honestly say that in my twelve years, I have never found this depressing.  I’ve found it sad.  There are situations that are sad and you do feel for patients and families and you really want to help them.  The reason it’s not depressing is because the families let us help them.  Families bring us in to what they are going through and allow us to share it with them.  It’s really uplifting, rewarding and not at all depressing.  If families did not let us in to the process and we were just out there taking vital signs, administering medication and washing people. I would find that depressing and probably wouldn’t be doing this anymore. But that is not oftentimes what our staff is able to do with patients and families.  We are really able to walk that journey with them.

Collins:
What is it that you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Bolden:
The first thing I want your readership to know is that hospice is not to be viewed as giving up.  That’s what I want family member’s of someone who is facing a serious illness to know is that hospice is not about giving up.  Hospice is going in a different direction.  It is saying that I want to have a little bit more control over what will be happening to me over the next few weeks or few months.  The other thing I want the readership to know is that is if you think hospice is something that they or a loved one need, the most benefits come from it by being connected with hospice earlier rather than later. 

There is this perception that hospice is for people who have been diagnosed with cancer when they are not going to receive any more treatment.  I want your readership to know that people that are taking care of an elderly relative who may have a serious heart ailment or lung disease or taking care of a parent or grandparent who doesn’t have a lot of support and who may be suffering with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.  In addition to the support that hospice provides, you will access the support of the team that will help you to access other support that is out there that you may not know about.  There are a tremendous amount of supports that are right in the community that can be accessed that you may not know of. 

If this is something that you may want to hear more about give us a call. I want to encourage you to talk to your physicians and your family and your pastor.  Talk about what might just be the right option for you or your loved one.  We can come out and evaluate and see what might be the best thing.

Collins:
How can people contact Compassionate Care Hospice to inquire about services?

Bolden:
It’s quite easy to do that, we are a phone call away at 1-800-844-4774.  However for those who don’t want to talk to anyone, we actually can be contacted through our website at www.compassionatecare.com. Click on location which is New Jersey.  Then click on the Westampton location.  You can actually send an email and it will come directly to me.  If you have any questions, you may email me directly at abolden@cch.net and I can answer any questions you might have at that time.

Collins:
Having the opportunity to sit down with Anthony Bolden, MSW, LSW, was truly a great blessing for me.  It opened up my understanding to what I only made guesses about when referring to hospice care.  I think of my own experiences of dealing with my father during the final years of his life as we battled as a family dealing with the issues associated with Alzheimer’s disease.  There were times when it took its toll on our very close niche family as we all shared in with providing care for him from sun up to the close of a night.  I often wonder how things would have been if our family were able to utilize many of the resources that I come in contact with often these days.  My father passed on in 1997 after battling Alzheimer’s for close to eight years.  Today, I encourage families like mine who dealt with some tough days and some wonderful days, to contact Anthony and allow Compassionate Care Hospice to assist in making the transition easier to deal with.  One of the challenges during the days of my father was that adult daycares were so expensive.  Here is an opportunity to get quality care for free and the opportunity for families to be able to keep up with somewhat of a normal schedule just by having professionals assist in the everyday care of your loved one.

By Chris Collins

 If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dooley House, Troy/Wallsten House of Hope and Partners Team Up 
for Annual Aids Walk at Cooper River Park

Pennsauken, NJ – For more than a quarter of a century the Dooley House of Camden, NJ under the guidance of its founder Emery Troy, has led the charge on many initiatives raising awareness and resources for children with HIV/Aids. Emery Troy has expanded his vision and partnered with several entities and now offers services for senior citizens.

Recently, the Dooley House teamed up with Walgreens Pharmacy, Westfield Pharmacy, TD Bank, Clear Energy, Hispanic Family Center, Clark Family Cancer, Camden RiverSharks, East Coast Entertainment Group, Jackson and Associates, Big Scott Entertainment and the Anointed News Journal for the annual aids walk.  Participants made contributions as they registered to walk, run and/or ride bicycles around the 4 mile park.  With such a beautiful sunny Sunday, most participants enjoyed strolling the distance.  For those who were tired, the Dooley House provided van transportation that circled the park to offer lifts back to the main area. The editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” had the opportunity to host an exclusive interview with Emery Troy himself.

Chris Collins: 
What is the Dooley House and how did it began?

Emery Troy: 
Reverend Collins roughly about 24 years ago we opened the Dooley House because there were so many babies and kids dying with HIV and AIDS. There was an article in the Atlantic City Press and a friend of mines called me up and ask me, “Did you read the article this morning about all of these kids dying from AIDS and there was no place to put them?”  From that day, him and I got together and met with the State of New Jersey and came up with the idea of this home for babies born with HIV and AIDS.  Once we started taking care of the babies, then we found out that there were mothers and young girls, 16 and 17 being born and we then had to take care of them. One thing led to another until we began housing, transportation and now we are doing seniors because that is the newest group with AIDS.

Chris Collins: 
Tell me a little bit about how the Dooley House is funded and then some of the outreached initiatives that you are doing to attract attention and additional funding?

Emery Troy: 
Dooley House is funded by the State and partially by the City of Camden. Now that time has changed and in recent years money has become less. We use to get state, federal and county dollars. Today we do not get those things. There still are some federal dollars and some county dollars but the amount of money is very small. As you know, times have changed and money that use to be available is not available. Non-profit must learn how to make money for their organization, with having to raise money; the need is even greater because people still need housing, transportation, and medicine. They need all the things we offer but we no longer have the money to serve that clientele like we use to. Now we have to do either less for them and in most cases it is less. We are learning how to have events to take the place of the dollars we use to get from the city, state and the county to be successful in what we are trying to do.

Chris Collins: 
Last year you had an event called “Dining Night Out” how successful was this event and what was the purpose?

Emery Troy: 
The event was very successful. The purpose was that all these restaurants agreed to give a certain percentage of their profits to Dooley House to be used by Dooley House for their programs. We have about fifteen programs and restaurants that did that.  This year coming we hope to get bigger and bigger. We had an AIDS walk on Sunday, May 1, 2011. It raised about $5000.00 versus dining out. This year on Sunday May 6, 2012 we look to do better. We are trying to do things that people want to do and be involved in where students will receive credit hours, older people can come and have a place to park, and feel safe. We are doing things that involve the community and the community is helping us because they are getting something in return. It is not just giving and you do not get.

Chris Collins:
You mentioned the AIDS walk. The AIDS walk took place throughout of the State of New Jersey and the Dooley House led the charge on this particular region at Cooper River, approximately how many people participated in the walk and who were your partners?  

Emery Troy: 
Some of the walkers were between 5 to 1000 people including students, people going to church, school, etc. We made the walk last most of the day so people can come anytime they want. Food was free. Someone donated the hotdogs, sodas, waters so that people could come have fun and really take part in it. Some of our partners were the Hispanic Family Community Center, Hospital, Family Planning, Two Pharmacies (Walgreens and Westville Pharmacy), the Electric Company that took an active part in it, and TD Bank. There were people who just came out in big numbers to celebrate their friends (the Clark Kane’s family) and that are what makes it popular in a sense because of what Dooley House does. We are family oriented; we are inclined to be part of your family. We do everything from the small babies to the older people because we want to be a service to everybody. We cannot do half of what we like to do but we will do what we can do.

Chris Collins: 
Emery, I have noticed that not only does the Dooley House provide service for the children and seniors, but you also serve as a conduit for bringing all cultures of people together and it showed during your walk. People at the walk were wearing your t-shirts and having a good time. What is your motivation to continue to fight this cause?

Emery Troy:
I am motivated by people who walk down the street and say, “Hi ET. I was at the event the other day and it made me feel so much better. I can believe in what you guys do because you involve the people,” they’re a part of it. I come from a family like that. We were kind of more on giving. In my family there are preachers and politicians and in Ohio, we had to work hard and I came here and this is a great place to be because of the people of Camden and the surrounding areas. If you show them that you are for real, they will give you all of the support you need.

Chris Collins: 
What is next for Emery Troy and the Dooley House? When I first met you, your concentration were just the babies, now you have advanced. You have the senior programs; you have had dining night out. What next for Emery Troy?

Emery Troy: 
We have transportation here now. We have a full time doctor. Dr. Regis has a full staff here. They have one side of the building. We have the office on aging here, an attorney here; we are trying to become a service for everybody. We have people who write grants, you can come here and see them. We also work with certain pharmacy’s that have authorized us that if you cannot go get your medicine, we will go pick it up for you and deliver it to your house. It is always something new, a new challenge. People say “Dooley House does something of everything.” I guess that is true. We want to be the Troy-Wallsten House of Hope. We want to be a hope for as many people as we can and we try to do as much as we can for little to no cost.

Chris Collins: 
You mentioned providing service for everyone. Now there is some buzz going around town that you are having a flea market coming up. Tell us a little about that.

Emery Troy: 
The flea market will be opposite of Campbell’s Field. The city and waterfront groups have been kind enough to allow us to use the lots. We offer to the non-profits and other groups who are running short of money for them to bring their things there. We are encouraging people to come sale food and we are selling a lot of clothes. We are trying to make things possibly new but some of it will not be. But items are going to be at reasonable prices. The whole event will be gated in, there will be no danger of cars; everyone will be safe. Parking will be outside of the gate. We will open about 7am unless we get rained out. People taking the train to Philadelphia, they will see the flea market. People are excited about it because it is something new. If you call the office, they will give all the information about how to get there and what the cost is.

Chris Collins:  
What is the contact information for someone who would like to get involved in the various initiatives that you are doing or would like to donate to the Dooley House?

Emery Troy: 
People can contact us at 129 Market, Camden New Jersey, 08102. The number is 856-225-1300. The secretary will give all pertinent information.

Chris Collins: 
Emery in conclusion, what is it that you would like to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Emery Troy:
The Anointed News Journal is a great news paper and always doing great things for the community. I think you are to get all support that you can. I also think that people need to inform you of all the great things that are going on in the community. The Anointed News Journal has a great following of people and does a great job getting your information to the community. It’s a great paper.

Chris Collins:
The Dooley House and Troy-Wallsten House of Hope has become a pillar in the city of Camden, New Jersey.  They have earned the respect of the community-at-large in business, corporate and government.  Not only do they provide outstanding services but they are a group of dynamic people that know how to add fun as the secret ingredient in everything they do.  The nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” salutes Mr. Emery Troy as our mover-and-shaker for the month. Stop by the office at 129 Market Street in Camden to introduce yourself to Mr. Troy.  They have an open door policy.  Tell them that the Anointed News Journal editor sent you.

By Chris Collins  

  If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

 

Langston Miles Sharing the Importance of being a Mentor

East Orange, NJ – Did you ever wonder where are our positive Black men?  Why are so many of our young men becoming statistics at alarming rates? Who will stand up and make a real difference in our community?

These are questions that are frequently asked by women of the community.  Many who take on the challenge of trying to raise Black males by themselves or with little support from others.  With this said our youth are becoming an endangered species if we don’t get involved. 

With this in mind the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper, “the Anointed News Journal”, visited a gentleman in the city of East Orange, NJ who understands the importance of mentoring and leads by example.

Langston Miles has mentored many young men from youth to adults including the middle aged.  For many years his strategies of mentoring has help to steer individuals in positive directions bringing positive outcomes.  In an exclusive interview with the editor Mr. Miles shared his outlook on mentorship.

Collins:
Mr. Miles, what does being a mentor mean to you?

Miles:
It means having the opportunity to be directly involved in another’s life as a guide and  regarded by that person in need of guidance as a support.

Collins:
When you look at the state of the African American male today, how important is mentoring?

Miles:
I think it’s the number one thing that needs to happen for a person because a mentor also stands in as a father figure. Since there are many single parent homes, this is something that is extremely needed.

Collins:
When you look at how young men were raised years ago compared to the way they are being raised today, what’s different?

Miles:
I recently spoke to a friend of mine who is a superintendent of schools in Maryland.  We shared with each other that the difference is the level of respect.  Some of it has to do with the cultural development of Black youth that has changed.  The more freedom or what we call freedom, that we have acquired, the less respect for the image of manhood.  Particularly in the Black community because the demarcation of what it meant to be a man became more and more eroded. I think our history has a lot to do with it. There are many factors that add to this such as our history where a Black man was called boy and where he was not able to get a job.  Also what we as men went through so that young men today can have opportunity is not appreciated by our young men. Yet we went through it so our children could have the things they have today but we would like to be appreciated for it.

Collins:
Do you feel that if young men today had more appreciation for what our forefathers had gone through, there would be a better community with less crime?

Miles:
Yes, that’s a good statement.  I think also what has happened is that the Black family has been torn apart.  The Black woman does not respect the Black man enough to understand that he does not have the same opportunity that she has. All of these things have fed into what’s going on in our society with our men.  I remember I used to tell my second wife who would often say, “these are my children”, that you are not going to put me out of this family.  I’m going to be a part of this family and I will be here.  They are not your children but they are our children.

Collins:
What advice do you offer to women today that could encourage her to have a different mindset of being more supportive to her man?

Miles:
I don’t think of any one thing but my spiritual teaching comes forth when I say that women need to learn what it means once they make a commitment.  They should understand that commitment is to be in submission to their husband.

Collins:
What advice do you offer to that man when it comes to raising his family?

Miles:
The husband needs to be in a position where he is truly expressing faith in God and allowing God to enable him to be all that he can be.  Not to rule over the wife in terms of having power in a negative or abusive way but through love gain the respect of the woman and care for her and support her as she supports him.  Not simply as a do unto her as she does unto him but to love her as God loves him.  Love should be the empowering force.

Collins:
When you look back at the many individuals you had the opportunity to mentor, how do you feel when they share a success story with you?

Miles:
For me it is very humbling.  When Roy began to talk about me being his mentor in public, I was very humble and very surprised.  Of course it’s a source of inspiration to be a blessing to as many people as you possibly can.

Collins:
In conclusion, I would declare that mentors save lives.  What do you want to say to the readers that would encourage them to become a mentor or to seek a mentor?

Miles:
I like to say to those who have the capacity to become a mentor to see it as a very sacred calling in terms of the need to be able to help folks to accomplish the goals that enable them to fulfill the destiny that God has intended for them.  I encourage them to go forth with a loving heart and a powerful sense of purpose in order to bring out the good that is present in this world system through the love of God. 

Collins:
Langston Miles is a remarkable gentleman that has mentored from the streets of New Jersey and throughout the pews in the church.  I’ve had the pleasure of meeting and speaking to some of his mentees who are all remarkable too.  The nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper, “the Anointed News Journal”, salutes Mr. Miles and the many mentors across this nation.  As I stated before, mentors save lives.  A special thank you to Benjamin White, Jr. who became my mentor as a young man and changed my course of direction.  I am who I am today because of what a mentor did for me yesterday.  In return, I will give myself today to save the life of another tomorrow.

By Chris Collins

   If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.

 

 

10 Year Old Honor Student  

Visionary Entertainment Sensation “Yung Poppa” Noted as the Industry’s Future Superstar

Camden, NJ – With many obstacles facing our young children today parenting is becoming more difficult.  Having to deal with the school crisis of educators being exposed by current government administration for failing to prepare children for the 21st century, having to deal with budget cuts that take away youth activities and services and having to deal with a struggling economy that makes it hard to provide a good quality of life all add to the mental anguish of trying our best to run a successful home.

There are some that think outside the box and experience creative ways of providing opportunity for their children to become successful.  Despite a struggling economy Mr. Rashaan Hornsby, CEO and President of Visionary Entertainment, created a platform for his 10 year old son, Rashaan Hornsby, Jr. to shine as an up and coming hip hop superstar.

Rashaan Hornsby, Jr. aka “Yung Poppa” is recognized as the “Prince of Camden”.  This 10 year old has been performing for quite some time; and has worked on his first CD project at the age of 9.  In an exclusive interview with the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper, the “Anointed News Journal”, Yung Poppa shared his outlook on his successful journey.

Collins:
Who is Rashaan Hornsby, Jr?

Poppa:
Rashaan Hornsby is an ordinary boy that goes to school but is very different from everybody else.  He goes hard at everything he does especially his grades and academics.  He helps out around the house with his mom, dad, aunts, uncles, grand mom and everyone.  He’s a good boy in school without any problems.

Collins:
What grade are you in and what school do you attend?

Poppa:
I’m in the fifth grade.  My teacher’s name is Ms. Robinson and I attend Cooper’s Poynt School.

Collins:
Somewhere along the line you gained the desire to become a young artist.  What motivated you to do this?

Poppa:
My motivation for becoming an artist came from looking at the first group my father had called, “3 Da Hardway”.  I liked their music, flow and everything about the group.  They were very versatile.  I went to my dad one day and said, “Dad I want to do this”.  My dad gave me his full support and my career just took off from there.

Collins:
Your stage name is “Yung Poppa”.  Tell me about “Yung Poppa” and what you represent.

Poppa:
I obtained my stage name because everyone called me “Poppa”.  We just added the “Yung” and called me “Yung Poppa”.  Everyone likes the name.  Yung Poppa is very good.  He makes the crowd get into his songs.  He has a lot of swag in his delivery and stage presence.

Collins:
Tell me something about your father who is also your manager.

Poppa:
My father and manager is who I love very much.  He came up with the vision by himself and has taken Visionary Entertainment to another level.  Now we are really going places.  I have to give a big shout out to my dad because he is very supportive.  He gets shows for me and if I can’t figure out a musical bar, he will assist me with that too.

Collins:
You released your first project entitled, “Triple Threat”.  What can people expect when they get a copy of “Triple Threat”?

Poppa:
They can expect different things.  I have different songs that represent different things.  For example, my first song is called, “Amazing”.  With this song I let people know who I really am, I am amazing.  As you go down the line I have various topics for my songs.  I have one about football, basketball and other things.  I let people know who I really am through my music.

Collins:
Sometimes the public may have a different perspective when it comes to rappers.  You mentioned that it is most important to you to maintain honor status with your grades in school.  What style of rapper would you classify yourself as being?

Poppa:
I have a very different swag then everyone else.  I rap about grades and sports.  I don’t rap about what other rappers rap about because I am a kid.  I’m only eleven years old so I rap about what a kid should be listening to.

Collins:
What do your peers have to say about you?

Poppa:
They say that they really like me.  Some are jealous because they want to be like me but I tell them not to but to be themselves.  Don’t try to act like me because I let them know they too can be successful.  I’m just being myself and try to have fun.

Collins:
Where have you performed and who are some of the others you’ve performed with?

Poppa:
I performed on Haddon Avenue, in shows at my school, the City of Philadelphia and performed for many people.  I do good songs for people and when I do that I make sure to let everyone know who I am.  Even when I do promotions for my CD, I make sure I let the public know who I am.

Collins:
How many tracks are on your first project?

Poppa:
I have 19 tracks on my first project.

Collins:
That seems like a lot.  Are you working on a second project?

Poppa:
Yes I am working on a second project.

Collins:
At the age of ten, how do you remember all of these things?

Poppa:
I remember because this is what I want to do and not what anyone else is forcing me to do.  I know what I have to do.  I place the images in my head.

Collins:
Are you the writer of your material or do others assist you?

Poppa:
I am the writer of my material but if I do need help, my dad and uncle along with a few others will help if needed.

Collins:
You have your first CD and you are doing performances.  You mentioned that your idol is Lil’ Wayne.  Where do you see yourself going from here?

Poppa:
I see myself making it real big.  People say I’m trying to be like Lil’ Bow Wow but I tell them no.  I’m just going to be myself, “Yung Poppa”, because I’m very different from him.

Collins:
Dad, how does it make you feel when you see the gift that your son has?

Hornsby:
I feel real good to watch him in the studio and performing live.  We just recently did a performance on Haddon Avenue in Camden for WhaGwaan Entertainment and the relief efforts in Haiti.  There the Mayor of Camden came out to witness the event.  WhaGwaan Entertainment actually has a store on Haddon Avenue.  It’s a Caribbean store.  There are a few real good guys over there that put on a relief effort for Haiti.  People came and donated canned goods and other items.  My company, Vision Entertainment participated by featuring some of our artists.  My son was the headliner for the Mayor.  He performed once and was so good that the public requested an encore performance. I just sat there and watched him.  I’m not just his father or manager but I’ve become a fan. I really like what he does.  He’s very positive and over all just a good kid and I’m very proud of him.

Collins:
I know it took some time to put this project together.  At the age of nine your son comes to you and says, “Hey pop I think I want to give this a try”.  What goes through your mind at that time?

Hornsby:
When I first started my company a year and a half ago, I had one group which consisted of my little brother as one of the artist.  He always had my son with him.  My son was always around and doing the songs with his own way and he came to me and said, “Dad, this is what I want to do”.  I thought nothing of it.  I asked him if he was serious about doing this and his reply was yes.  At that time I said, “I’ll do my part and you do your part”.  From there it just happened and I was happy.  I really want to give him as many positive outlets as humanly possible and we are happy.  He knows that his academics come first and foremost.  He is an honor student and as long as he keeps his grades up, and my daughter too, I’m behind them in whatever.

Collins:
Your son is academically talented, musically wonderful as well as athletically.  Are you ready for what is about to come?

Hornsby:
Yes! I’m definitely ready.  In addition to him I have nine other artists in my company.  I run it day to day and do everything myself from production to graphic design, etc.  I do it all.  I have a background in management for about ten years and I’m prepared for the next thing.  I went out on my own a year and a half ago and started my own multi-media company and it’s been good.  I work hard and my son works hard.  Not just with his academics but with wrestling, football, basketball and everything he does.  I’m ready for good things to happen for him, me and my city too.  Camden City needs some positivity here.  It’s not just crime and murder but there are good people here such as my son and I that want to do good things in our community and help out.

Collins:
What’s next for Visionary Entertainment?

Hornsby:
Next for Visionary Entertainment is “Yung Poppa”.  As well as him I have an artist Lero, Trap Money and 3 Da Hardway.  We are now doing a lot of marketing and promotions for them.  We are shopping for a distribution deal and looking to take the artists to the next level.  We have our first video done and want to keep the buzz and promotions going for the company.

Collins:
What do you want to say to the readers of the Anointed News Journal?

Hornsby:
I live by what my company’s model is, men and women of caliber do not use the word can’t unless it precedes the word fail.  I feel as though that there sums it up about myself, my company and what I stand for. I don’t believe there is nothing I can’t do but fail.  If you never quit, there’s no way you could ever fail.  I do not see myself quitting with anything that I do.

Poppa:
The same as what my dad just said, I don’t give up, I just keep going and keep going.  When people ask me if I get tired my answer is no because this is something that I really want.  I want everyone to know that I am a positive rapper.  I do everything to accommodate the public.  I take pictures with people and try to do what I can for everyone.

My name is Rashaan Hornsby and I am 10 years old, I was born & raised in Camden, N.J. my stage name is “Yung- Poppa.”  My uncle “Dre’ Dollaz” inspired me to rap, I got off to a good start with my writing, but I would start getting off topic after a while. My uncle “Dollaz” helped me learn how to stay on topic, and then a week later he said, “Poppa” you have to learn this rap that he had written for me, the name of the rap was “Yung- Poppa Going In”. It was easy to learn so I recorded the track that same night. I was so happy to have laid my first track down and my family was very happy as well. One of my favorite Hip- Hop Artist is “LIL Wayne” I love his music, but I want to be a better artist than him some day. In addition to being a Hip- Hop Artist, I also play Football for the Centerville Simbas & Wrestle for the Camden Wolverines Wrestling Club and have the privilege to have my father as my coach. My favorite color is blue, I would also like to go to college and become an architect in the future. With my Academics, Sports, & Entertainment career combined that makes me a “Triple Threat”, and at the end of my Hip- Hop career I would like to be considered one of the Greatest Rap Artist of all times! As I stated in one of my raps Education always comes first, so I’m going to be the example for every kid living to stay in school and always pursue your dreams, because anything is possible if you never quit! And last but not least after a long day at school, football or wrestling practice, and a hot studio session I always can go for my favorite meal, “Popeye’s”. ONE!!!

Collins:
How can people contact you for engagements?

Hornsby:
To book “Yung Poppa”, send me an email at bighomey@visionaryentertainmentllc.com or by phone at (856) 246-9700.  Be on the lookout for www.visionaryentertainmentllc.com and www.yungpoppa.com. Both are under construction and will be available soon.  People can get a copy of the CD through the online sites through digital distribution or you can send me an email and I will definitely get it out to you.  The cost is only $5.

Collins:
The nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper, “The Anointed News Journal”, salutes Mr. Hornsby and Yung Poppa for taking the time to interview with us.  Yung Poppa came highly recommended by several community leaders in Camden City.  I had the opportunity to review the project and find it to be very tasteful and good energy.  I recommend every parent to share this up and coming hip hop sensation with your children.  Yung Poppa is on the rise and most importantly he is an honor student maintaining straight A’s with the exception of one B.

I felt that the questions asked during the interview were valid without curbing them to accommodate his age level.  Yet in return, Yung Poppa responded without hesitation requiring me to ask the more challenging questions.

To see a live performance of Yung Poppa for yourself, the nation’s premier faith-based and urban professional newspaper, “The Anointed News Journal” will feature him during the “Wawa Welcome America, Bulldog Bikes Worldwide BMX Hybrid Tour” on July 3rd at the Camden Waterfront just before the firework display at lot 11 (Cooper Street).  We encourage Camden residents to arrive early as festivities will start at 1pm until 9pm.  Visionary Entertainment will have plenty of CD’s available for the public.

Here are a few links that you can add for Yung Poppa, thank you for everything. Peace & Blessing

1.         www.myspace.com/yungpoppave

2.         www.twitter.com/visionaryprince

3.         www.yungpoppa.com

4.         www.visionaryentertainmentllc.com

5.         www.youtube.com/cmdlostkingdom

By Chris Collins

  If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.  

 

 

Cory Pritchett, Co-Star of “Sparkle” Shares with Anointed His Experiences of Working with the Late Whitney Houston and the Star Studded Cast

Sicklerville, NJ – Although there has been some controversy over the death of the late Whitney Houston concerning some challenges she has faced in life, the final screen showing displayed her fabulous work as a screen actress. 

Whitney plays fiercely protective matriarch Emma, who is determined to keep her three daughters away from the temptations that nearly killed her.

A singer in her young years, Emma is hell-bent on discouraging the musical aspirations of youngest daughter Sparkle (Jordan Sparks).

Whitney’s character which in my opinion was flawless was on the same level as other roles she played in previous movies, The Body Guard and The Preacher’s Wife.”

Cory Pritchett played the character Ham, a smooth dressing man that watched out and protected the smooth but cruel character and comedian Satin (Mike Epps).

In an exclusive interview with the editor of the nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper, “The Anointed News Journal,” Cory shared his outlook for “Sparkle” and what’s coming in the near future for him.

Collins:
Cory, I thank you for spending time with me here in New Jersey.  For our readers of the Anointed News Journal, tell us who is Cory Pritchett?

Cory:
I am a hardworking humble man trying to make it in the industry that I love and wanted to be in every since I was a child.

Collins:
What motivated you to become an actor?

Cory:
My son. I had my son at the age of 20. I promised him that he would have a better life than me.

Collins:
You are fairly young now at the age of 23, so I assume you got a late start in acting. How did it all happen? Were you somewhere and was discovered by someone?

Cory:
Yes. I was working in a warehouse and my mother’s boss came to me and gave me an application for an acting position.  He said, “Take this and see what it’s about because you are a clown.”  I took it and paid a fee to Reel Style, I did a lot of extra work and finally I was given an opportunity.

Collins:                                                                              
Sparkle was a huge movie not only because of the cast of celebrities that were featured in it but also it was the last screen film for the legendary Whitney Houston. What were your experiences like working with this cast as well as Whitney Houston?

Cory:
As far as Whitney Houston, may she rest in peace.  She was a beautiful person even from the beginning she never pushed anyone away.  She would offer me the opportunity to come ask questions and she was always willing to help me out with whatever I needed. I thank her for that.  She helped me to feel confident. She was someone who I idolized as a kid.

Collins:
What about the former American Idol, Jordan Sparks, who is a fan favorite with all of the young fellows like yourself?

Cory:
Jordan Sparks is nice. She’s very beautiful and a very nice person.  She also helped me and was very friendly with my son.

Collins:
You played a character that supported Mike Epps, who was sort of the villain of this film.  Some say this role was a game changer for Mike Epps.  What was it like working with him as closely as you did?

Cory:
Mike helped school me.  He really played a key role in my development not just on the film set but also off the set. The things that happen off the set are very important and being with Mike Epps every day offered me the opportunity to learn something new.

Collins:
You character as Ham was very noticeable and made the audience wonder what was up with you.  You were like Mike Epps body guard or as I say, “right hand man.” You were very quiet in the movie yet extremely sharp with fashion and the ladies.  What was it like for you to play this kind of role?

Cory:
It was actually hard because although you do not necessarily speak often, you have to show the emotions. Right now we are talking with one another and people can understand words but when it comes to facial expressions, that is what gets your attention and that is actually more difficult to communicate with just expressions.

Collins:
When you think of the movie Sparkle, which was a re-make of the original with Irene Cara, who was too a phenomenal Golden Glove actress for her performance in the 1980 film FAME and 1984 Best Original Song for co-writing “Flashdance…What A Feeling,” which also became an international hit, how does it make you feel to be a part of this project?

Cory:
I feel extremely good and I hope that I made the original cast members and producers of the film proud.

Collins:
That is well said especially by this movie being such a hit at the box office and it being the first major showing for Cory Pritchett.  Where do you go from here?

Cory:
Hopefully to the top. My goal is to be better than Denzel because everyone knows Denzel. Every actor knows of his work and that’s who I want to model myself after.

Collins:
You talked about giving your son a better life than what you’ve experienced.  Do you think that entertainment might be something to get him involved in?

Cory:
If my son wants to I would offer him that opportunity but I will support whatever he likes. I just want to be able to give him the avenue to do whatever he likes.

Collins:
How do your former manager who kind of discovered you feel now as well as some of your former co-workers back at the warehouse?

Cory:
I actually went back there the other day to thank him and he also thanked me.  He is too humble and I am very grateful that he took an interest in me.

Collins:
Former American Idol, Jordan Sparks was discovered and became the star of “Sparkle”.  Many entertainers are discovered doing regular things such as yourself.  What advice do you give to someone you may be an aspiring entertainer?

Cory:
If I could say a couple of things, I would say reach for the clouds and you might get a star. Also I say, “Accept the good with the bad. If you really want to do this you have to stay on it.  You cannot slack. You must work 24 hours a day without taking time off because when you do take time off, someone else is there to take your opportunity from you. Stay on your dream all day and all night.”

Collins:
Whitney Houston seemed to be a perfectionist when it came to work.  What was your work schedule like while making this film?

Cory:
Every day almost all day.  We would go on the set at about 7am and work all day.  Sometimes around the clock and stop just long enough for you to take a nap for maybe an hour or two and then get right back to work.  This is a very hectic business without fun and games.  Even though we do have moments of fun, this is a very serious business.

Collins:
The Anointed News Journal serves more than 180,000 readers around the country in print and with Anointed Online our website
www.anointedonline.net we serve people globally in every nation.  What do you want to say to the readers of Anointed?

Cory:
Please follow me on Twitter at FOREVERCORY and on FACEBOOK at CORY PRITCHETT STAR. Please support me and I will always come back and support you.  Just ask my hometown, I was just there in Detroit last week for fun day.  I was there in the middle of the hood with all of my people. Being in film and being around Hollywood stars will never change where I come from.

Collins: 
The nation’s premier faith-based and professional newspaper for winners, “The Anointed News Journal” certainly thanks Cory Pritchett for spending time and sharing with us. Cory is indeed a humble man with a heart to help all people.  Although he came to visit from Detroit, Michigan he has several ties to Southern New Jersey.  In fact he attended his 8th grade year at Hatch Middle School in Camden, NJ and resided in Sicklerville, NJ with his father.

Cory will be making several appearances while in this market and looks to gain the support of every age demographic and ethnicity as we look to establish his fan base.  He has recently supported causes to raise money for the Dooley House of Camden, NJ supporting its mission to provide supportive services to children and adults living with HIV/AIDS. He will be making visits to the schools in the areas to speak with children of all ages. He is also looking to make a featured appearance in the stage play Psychosis 224 written by John Graves Productions and sponsored by the Anointed News Journal, Walt Whitman Cultural Center and 20 Horse Restaurant in December 2012. He is also featured regularly on Saturday mornings on WNJC Radio 1360AM sponsored by the C.U.R.E. Management Team. C.U.R.E. Management and Anointed are working in conjunction to manage Cory’s schedule of events while in the area.  For appearances and bookings contact Anointed News Journal at 856-904-9429.  Look for the live interview with Chris Collins and Cory Pritchett at www.anointedonline.net.

By Chris Collins

 

Cory Lee Pritchett (born March 4, 1989) is an American actor and model. 

Early Life

Cory was born in Woodbury, New Jersey, the son of Thomas Johnson III and Cheri Pritchett.  He is the older of two siblings.  During his senior year of high school, he was not being challenged, so he left and started attending the local community college.  After taking an acting class he knew that he had a passion for acting and knew that this would be the career for him.  To strengthen his acting abilities he attended John Robert Powers Talent School where he learned modeling and acting.  He learned skills such as reading a script, voice-overs, teleprompt reading, and all the skills necessary to become a seasoned actor.

Career

Cory made his small screen debut in a film taped in Detroit, MI called Vamps – due to be released Halloween 2012 - featuring Alicia Silverstone and Malcolm MacDowell.   He made a cameo appearance in the movie This Must be the Place featuring Sean Penn, also filmed in Detroit, released January 21, 2012. 

Cory decided to try his acting skills before a live audience in the stage play One Big Mess, featuring CoCo from FM 98 WJLB Detroit.  He enjoyed the live audience due to the feedback of the crowd.  Being live means no do-over, so he knew that he had to be prepared.  He also starred in a music video with Insane Clown Posse. 

The big screen debut came August 17, 2012 with a principle role in the movie Sparkle.  He played Mike Epps right-hand man Ham.  The movie had an all-star cast which included the late Whitney Houston and Jordin Sparks among many other talented people.

Personal life

Cory would like to recognize his mother and grandmother for life lessons and teaching him strength to never give on his dreams.

Filmography

·        Vamps (2012):  Gory

·        This Must be the Place (2012):  Drug addict

·        One Big Mess (2012):  Convict/Choir member

·        Insane Clown Posse music video:  Gambler

·        Sparkle (2012):  Ham

  If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.  

 

 

Queen Pauline Speaks

 This past month I became so ill that I felt close to extinction. I had caught a very bad cold which had caused me to feel much pain within my head and chest. I thought I was having a stroke and was able to move my hands and arms. With each breathe I took, the chest pain multiplied. During the night, I ensured that my phone was charged and my home phone plugged in just in case I had to call emergency to the hospital. I decided to keep much of the pain to myself. My family knew that I had a bad cold because I was coughing, sneezing and sleeping all day. I went to the Doctor the next day, yet as soon as the Doctor called me into the examination room the main symptoms had strangely disappeared although I was very sleepy. I was told to rest and relax and that I was running around too much which I knew too. Just a week prior to this experience, I was informed in a dream to rest and relax.

 While I was having chest pain I had a conversation with GOD that went like this: “Why am I feeling so bad and I eat okay? “GOD, why am I having such a difficult time dealing with people who take advantage of me?” Approximately, three days after I had the conversation with GOD, GOD SPOKE TO ME...Yet the way in which GOD communicated with me was by a KNOWING…as I did not hear a voice. Anyway, the KNOWING went like this…I have blessed you with ideas to thrive yet you allow people to inject doubt. They know you can but inject doubt to keep you from your power. What’s so crazy is that you share what is for you with others and you remain stagnant. You don’t need a PH.D for the mission I have given you. As a matter of fact, a higher degree would have taken you off the spiritual path destined for you. I wanted to preserve from the world. Stop aborting creative ideas I give you. Stop sharing everything with other people who give you nothing back. When you abort ideas back to back for many years, you are no better than a woman who has too many physical abortions. Too many abortions lead to wear and tear on the body and subsequently ill health. You must be the spiritual communicator you are sent to earth to fulfill and then everything will fall into place.”

When God gives us divine inspiration meaning holy in spirit action it must be acted upon quickly. Our creative ideas which are from God are given to us to manifest purpose. When we give it all away easily we can never “make it happen” and will continue to chase after the wind and have nothing but poverty. When we constantly abort our ideas and goals, we destroy our spirits and will not experience success or happiness.

I am available for spiritual prophecy and consultations, laying on of the hands, healing, prayer request and more. You can ask questions about anything you desire in this weekly column entitled “Queen Pauline Speaks”, here at Anointed News Journal published by Reverend Chris Collins. Be sure to inform your family, friends and neighbors. Spread the word about Queen Pauline! I can help you no matter what your religious inclinations may be as I stay focused on God. God is for all people, races and religions because God IS LOVE and LOVE IS GOD AND I LOVE YOU.

 Queen Pauline a.k.a. Pauline Rogers is an Interfaith Minister making an effort to bring people together from all walks of life. She is the author of 13 Million Prayers for World Peace and The World Peace Fast. She has been Writing and Teaching for over 30 years. She can be reached at (267) 444-5018.

   If you’ve been blessed by this article PLEASE SUPPORT OUR MISSION BY SENDING YOUR FINANCIAL GIFT TODAY to Anointed News Journal, PO Box 309, Camden, New Jersey, USA 08103.  

 

Monica’s Motivational Message:

 Keep your spirits uplifted at all times. “Ignore” & “Delete” all of the negative elements that are consuming & keeping you stagnant in life.  Stay away from the negative, jealous, gossiping, complaining, ignorant & small minded people. Ask yourself these three questions: Are these people are adding or subtracting positive energy into your everyday existence?  Are they bringing value & purpose to your life? Are they helping you achieve the next level of greatness in your life?  If you answered “NO” then these types of people are what you call “Positive Energy Drainers” and they will leave you with an AURA that lacks luster.

 Life is too short to wake up lifeless…..wake up and smell the flowers, tell your family you love them, encourage someone today!  You never know, the “Positive Energy” that you exude could have a huge impact on someone that is ready to give up or at the end of their rope, maybe that’s all they needed to excel to the next level. 

 

Monica-Steele-Taylor

 

Monica’s Motivational Moment:

Some of us are given God’s gift of the “ability” to see, taste, touch, hear and smell.  When you can see the color of the leaves change from summer to fall seasons, taste the food that you carefully prepared with your very own hands, feel the touch of a loved one and they are able to touch you back, hear the comforting sound of your mother’s voice and she can hear yours back and to be able to take a deep breath to smell the beauty of life, all of these “abilities” are often taken for granted and for some of us this is considered a “disability”so be grateful!

Everyone has the “ability” to “endure”.  You were put on this earth whether “able” or “disabled” to “endure” your life struggles, ups & downs, highs & lows.  To have the “ability” to endure shows growth and when you grow you change and when you change you share and when you share you show love.  Nothing comes easy and some of us just don’t have that stamina to keep up, so you have to work twice as hard on building up your endurance.  Whatever stage in life you’re in just know you can “endure” anything.   The question is how well equipped are you?  He gave you the “ability”!

Open up your heart, mind, body & soul; embrace the gift he gave us all “the ability to endure”.  So what I’m simply saying is BUILD UP YOUR ENDURANCE and the world could be yours!  Press forward and always stay focused!

 Monica Steele-Taylor

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Last modified: September 13, 2014